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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for C. S. A. Mason or search for C. S. A. Mason in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), An incident at the battle of Romney. (search)
around us, a little incident occurred which I think is worthy of notice. Capt. Butterfield, of the Eighth Ohio regiment, (being one of the ranking captains,) acted as major upon that occasion, and was obliged to ride an old sorrel horse, which had been used as a team horse, and required both spurs and whip, which the captain had provided himself with, the latter cut from a tree and about five feet long. It was found that our small six-pound guns would not reach the enemy's battery, and Col. Mason ordered Captain B. to bring forward a brass twelve-pounder which was in the rear Off sped the old sorrel and his brave rider, and in a few moments up came the gun. Its position was assigned and made ready for the match, but the captain came dashing back in front of the gun, and the smell of powder or something else had made the old sorrel almost unmanageable, for in trying to wheel him from the front of the gun, the more the captain applied the whip and spur, the more the old sorrel would
ard: Davis's skill in government could never be surpassed-- The amazing strokes of genius by which he cash amassed; Foreign bankers would acknowledge ere a month had passed away, That the true financial paradise was in the C. S. A. * * * * * * Some days are passed, and pleasantly, upon Bermuda's Isle, The sun is shining bright and fair, and Nature seems to smile: The breezes waved the British flag that fluttered o'er the “Trent,” And the ripples rose to lave her sides as proudly on she went. Mason and Slidell on her deck thought all their dangers past, And poked each others' ribs and laughed as they leant against the mast: “Haven't the Yankees just been done uncommonly nicely, eh? They've got most money, but the brains are in the C. S. A.!” You have heard the ancient proverb, and, thoa old, it's very good, Which hints “That it's better not to crow until you've left the wood:” And so it proved with these two gents, for at that moment — souse! A cannon-shot fell splash across
When Col. Corcoran, while a prisoner at Richmond, Va., was told that he was to be hung if one of the privateers on trial at the North was selected for punishment by death, he said: Well, sir, I am ready; when I engaged in this war I made up my mind to sacrifice my life, if necessary, in defence of that flag under which I have lived and gained an honorable position. --Buffalo Courier, Dec. 9. Norfolk, Nov. 18, 1861. the news of the arrival in Hampton Roads of Ministers Slidell and Mason, also their secretaries, in the United States frigate San Jacinto excited considerable interest here on Saturday night and yesterday. It is stated by a gentleman from Old Point that six shots were fired between the two vessels. It is also reported that the papers of the Ministers were not taken, and that the ladies connected with the party were allowed to proceed on the voyage.--Richmond Dispatch.
66. Mason work. by Major. One more unfortunate! Poor F. F. V.! Rashly importunate, Caught out at sea! Take him up tenderly, Abraham L.; Handle him gingerly-- No one can tell What risks we encounter, In thus rudely chasina The pompous ambassador, C. S. A. Mason! Ah, the proud Minister Cometh to grief; With prospects so brilliant, How wonderful brief His life diplomatic-- All smoothly it runs, Till over his pathway It bloweth great guns! A sorry denouement This, brave F. F. V.; Thy fondesC. S. A. Mason! Ah, the proud Minister Cometh to grief; With prospects so brilliant, How wonderful brief His life diplomatic-- All smoothly it runs, Till over his pathway It bloweth great guns! A sorry denouement This, brave F. F. V.; Thy fondest hopes blasted, Thy plans all at sea! You dreamed not of capture, While with Johnny Bull; You thought if we tried it, We'd have our hands full! But when Uncle Samuel Appeared on your track, And gave you his thunder, To which you knocked under, O! is it a wonder You were taken aback? O! poor Master Mason, There are sermons in stones-- Don't they speak to you yonder In eloquent tones? Howe'er mortar-fying To “go to the wall,” We think we've discovered Your Forte after all! We send you to Warren,
84. songs of the rebels. Death of the Lincoln Despotism. air--Root, Hog, or Die. The following stanzas were written soon after the arrest of Messrs. Mason & Slidell, but from reasons unavoidable their publication has been delayed: 'Twas out upon mid-ocean that the San Jacinto hailed An English neutral vessel, while on her course she sailed; Then sent her traitor Fairfax, to board her with his crew, And beard the “British lion” with his “Yankee Doodle-doo.” The Yankees took her passengers, and put them on their ship, And swore that base secession could not give them the slip; But England says she'll have them, if Washington must fall, So Lincoln and his “nigger craft” must certainly “feel small.” Of all the “Yankee notions” that ever had their birth, The one of searching neutrals affords the greatest mirth-- To the Southrons; but the Yankees will ever hate the fame Which gave to Wilkes and Fairfax their never-dying name. Throughout the North their Captain Wi