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Browsing named entities in Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee. You can also browse the collection for George Mason or search for George Mason in all documents.

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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 1: ancestry. (search)
778 he was a member of the convention called in Virginia to consider the ratification of the Federal Constitution. In the battle of intellectual giants composing that body, with eloquence and zeal he pleaded for its adoption. By his side, and voting with him on that important question, were such men as James Madison, John Marshall, afterward Chief Justice of the United States, and Edmund Randolph; while in the ranks of the opposition stood Patrick Henry with immense oratorical strength, George Mason, the wisest man, Mr. Jefferson said, he ever knew, Benjamin Harrison, William Grayson, and others, who thought the Constitution, as it came from the hands of its framers, conferred too much power on the Federal Government and too little upon its creator, the States. In 1786 he was a delegate to the Continental Congress. From 1792 to 1795 he was Governor of Virginia, and was selected by President Washington to command the fifteen thousand men from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland,
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 2: birth.-career as officer of Engineers, United States army. (search)
I, owing to my accompanying General Twiggs's division in the pursuit, and being since constantly in the advance. I believe all our friends are safe. I think I wrote you that my friend Joe Johnston Afterward the distinguished commander. was wounded the day before I arrived at the Plano del Rio while reconnoitering. He was wounded in the arm and about the groin; both balls are out, and he was doing well and was quite comfortable when I left; the latter wound was alone troublesome. Captain Mason, of the rifles, was badly wounded in the leg, and General Shields was wounded in the chest; I have heard contradictory reports that he was doing well and that he was dead. I hope the former. Jalapa is the most beautiful country I have seen in Mexico, and will compare with any I have seen elsewhere. I wish it was in the United States, and that I was located with you and the children around me in one of its rich, bright valleys. I can conceive nothing more beautiful in the way of lands
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 4: War. (search)
endent States, and that all political connection between these States and the State of Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved. Nine States, a requisite number, had approved the Constitution before Virginia acted. The debates in her convention on this subject have no equal in intellectual vigor. Mental giants, full-armed with wisdom, fought on either side. In one rank-opposed to the adoption of the Constitution as it came from the hands of its framers — was Patrick Henry, George Mason, Richard Henry Lee, James Monroe, Benjamin Harrison, and William Grayson. In the other were James Madison, John Marshall, Edmund Randolph, Edmund Pendleton, and General Henry Lee, and behind them, as a powerful reserve, was the great influence of Washington. On the final vote friends of the measure secured a majority of only ten votes. The next State to adopt it after Virginia was New York, and she did so by only three votes. North Carolina did not join the Union immediately, and Rhod
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 7: Atlantic coast defenses.-assigned to duty in Richmond as commander in chief under the direction of the Southern President. (search)
only other place I could go to now acceptable to us, that would inspire me with pleasure and local love. You and the girls could remain there in quiet. It is a poor place, but we could make enough corn-bread and bacon for our support, and the girls could weave us clothes. You must not build your hopes on peace on account of the United States going to war with England. Our rulers are not entirely mad, and if they find England is in earnest, and that war or a restitution of the captives Mason and Slidell. must be the consequence, they will adopt the latter. We must make up our minds to fight our battles and win our independence alone. No one will help us. In still another letter from the same place the general writes Mrs. Lee: I am truly grateful for all the mercies we enjoy, notwithstanding the miseries of war, and join heartily in the wish that the next year may find us in peace with all the world. I am delighted to hear that our little grandson is improving so fast
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
at Gettysburg, 279, 280; mentioned, 198, 202, 204, 206, 209, 254. McLean, Wilmer, of Appomattox, 393. McPherson Heights, 271. Marlborough, Duke of, 171, 288. Malvern Hill, battle of, 163, 165, 173. Manassas, second battle of, 186. Mangold, Captain of German army, 301. Mansfield, General, killed at Antietam, 213. Marye's Hill, 230, 231. Maryland Heights, 104, 203, 206, 213. Marshall, Colonel, Charles, of Lee's staff, 393. Marshall, John, 10. Marshall, William, 19. Mason, Captain, 39. Matamoras, city of, 63. Mattapony River, 338. Matthews, John, 9. Maxey, General, killed at Fredericksburg, 233. Mayflower, slaves on, 83. Meade, Bishop, 95. Meade, General George G., succeeds Hooker, 269; his character, 269; statement by, 299; censured, 306; mentioned, 227, 228, 277, 278, 283, 302, 304. Meagher's Irish brigade, 231. Meigs, General, 107. Merrimac frigate, 138. Merritt, General, Wesley, mentioned, 333, 373. Mexican Republic, 31. Mex