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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for George Mason or search for George Mason in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
Miss Bang, of Nashville, was the Evening Star. The Theatre was crowded, and the Southern Mothers reaped a rich harvest. December 16th.—Entered upon my duties at the hospital to-day. Read ninety pages of Brodie on Mind and Matter. Find it hard to hold my mind to the matter of study after six months of camp-life. December 18th.—Returning to the city from the country this morning, I was overjoyed to see in the morning papers the announcement that England had demanded the surrender of Mason and Slidell. Attended a concert at the Theatre this evening. The attendance was the largest and most select that I have ever seen in Memphis. Miss Bang, the Jenny Lind of America, was the attraction. I have never heard anything so sweet as her singing. December 19th.—The morning papers are fraught with interest. John Bull is aroused at the outrage committed by Captain Wilkes in seizing our Commissioners on board a British ship, and if they are not given up immediately England will br<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
Miss Bang, of Nashville, was the Evening Star. The Theatre was crowded, and the Southern Mothers reaped a rich harvest. December 16th.—Entered upon my duties at the hospital to-day. Read ninety pages of Brodie on Mind and Matter. Find it hard to hold my mind to the matter of study after six months of camp-life. December 18th.—Returning to the city from the country this morning, I was overjoyed to see in the morning papers the announcement that England had demanded the surrender of Mason and Slidell. Attended a concert at the Theatre this evening. The attendance was the largest and most select that I have ever seen in Memphis. Miss Bang, the Jenny Lind of America, was the attraction. I have never heard anything so sweet as her singing. December 19th.—The morning papers are fraught with interest. John Bull is aroused at the outrage committed by Captain Wilkes in seizing our Commissioners on board a British ship, and if they are not given up immediately England will br<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of General Dabney H. Maury at the Reunion of Confederate veterans, Maury camp, no. 2, Fredericksburg, Va., August 23, 1883. (search)
e patriarchs, under their own vine and fig-tree, served by the kindly hands of willing slaves, freed from all impecunious cares, undiverted by newspapers or telegrams, and unknowing of any short cuts to knowledge, with minds stored with the precedents of history, and trained in the great schools of thought, those men wrought out and announced the plan of self-government which stands to-day the envy and admiration of all the peoples of the earth, and the terror of all the tyrants. Thus, George Mason, of Gunston Hall, made the Bill of Rights of Virginia, and Jefferson, of Monticello, a few years later, framed it into the Declaration of the Independence of these United States. I need not name these men to you; but they have been aptly grouped in another's words. Just after the close of the war between the States, this Congressional district was represented in Congress by Judge John Critcher, of Westmoreland county. In the course of debate in the House of Representatives, a member