hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 70 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 66 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 52 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 52 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 31 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 26 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 26 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 24 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 20, 1861., [Electronic resource] 22 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for James M. Mason or search for James M. Mason in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 9 document sections:

my command in column, in the following order: the First Regiment of Ohio Volunteers, Col. McCook; the Second Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Mason; the Second New York State Militia, Col. Tompkins; and Capt. Carlisle's Battery of Light Artillery, six (6) brass g Ohio, followed by the Second New York, towards the head of the road, in supporting distance from the First Ohio, Lieut.Col. Mason's regiment filing also to the left. Receiving Col. McCook's report of the battery, and that it would be impossible to ompany of the Second New Yorkers, to cover the men while cutting through the enemy's abatis. A second company from Lieut.-Col. Mason's command was also brought forward with axes, afterwards, to aid in clearing the obstructions, and thus, in a short, by the presence of a large and organized body, protection to any stragglers that might have taken that route. Lieutenant-Colonel Mason, with the Second Ohio, marched in by the way of Fall's Church and Camp Upton. The return of the Ohio regiment
hell struck his horse, taking its head off, and killing the horses of his aids, Messrs. Ferguson and Hayward. Gen. Beauregard's aids deserve honorable mention, particularly those just named, and Cols. W. Porcher Miles, James Chesnut, John L. Manning, and A. R. Chisolm. Gen. Johnston also threw himself into the thickest of the fight, seizing the colors of a Georgia regiment, and rallying them to the charge. His staff signalized themselves by their intrepidity, Col. Thomas being killed and Major Mason wounded. Your correspondent heard Gen. Johnston exclaim to Gen. Cocke just at the critical moment, Oh, for four regiments! His wish was answered, for in the distance our reinforcements appeared. The tide of battle was turned in our favor by the arrival of General Kirby Smith, from Winchester, with 4,000 men of Gen. Johnston's division. Gen. Smith heard while on the Manassas railroad cars the roar of battle. He stopped the train, and hurried his troops across the field to the point
as plunged the country into civil war, paralyzed our commerce, interfered with the whole trade and business of our country, lessened the value of our property, destroyed many of the pursuits of life, and bids fair to involve the whole nation in irretrievable bankruptcy and ruin. It has changed the entire relations of States, and adopted constitutions without submitting them to a vote of the people, and where such a vote has been authorized, it has been upon the condition prescribed by Senator Mason, of Virginia, that those who voted the Union ticket must leave the State. It has advocated a constitutional monarchy, a King and a Dictator, and is, through The Richmond Press, at this moment, recommending to the Convention in Virginia a restriction of the right of suffrage, and in severing connection with the Yankees to abolish every vestige of resemblance to the institutions of that detested race. It has formed military leagues, passed military bills, and opened the door for oppr
Doc. 53.-Virginia delegates to the Southern Congress. List of Delegates to represent the State in the Southern Congress, which meets at Richmond on the 21st July: 1. R. M. T. Hunter, of Essex. 2. John Tyler, of Charles City. 3. W. H. Macfarland, of Richmond City. 4. Roger A. Pryor, of Petersburg. 5. Thomas S. B. Cook, of Appomatox. 6. W. C. Rives, of Albemarle. 7. Robert E. Scott, of Fauquier. 8. James M. Mason, of Frederick. 9. John W. Brockenbaugh, of Brockenridge. 10. Charles W. Russell, of Wheeling. 11. Robert Johnson, of Harrison. 12. Walter Staples, of Montgomery. 13. Walter Preston, of Washington. State at Large — James A. Seddon, of Goochland; W. B. Preston, of Montgomery.--Baltimore American, June 27
More than this, there is not only no such statute to be found from 1789 to this moment, but the Federal Government has been to the South the most parental of Governments. It has yielded to the South all it ever asked or demanded. In 1793 the South wanted a fugitive slave law, and, as it was entitled, received it. It demanded afterwards a better and more stringent fugitive slave law, and it was not only granted, but the drafting of it was left to a Virginia Senator of the United States, Mr. Mason. In 1820 we made with the Federal Government a certain compact, the celebrated Missouri Compromise, with which we were then so well pleased that every Southern Senator but one voted for it, and a large majority of Southern Representatives. But in the course of time, when the wave of politics set high, and politics became a trade, we became dissatisfied with the compromise of 1820, and we appealed to the Federal Government to break up the old, and make a new contract. The Federal Governm
, of Ga. the Cabinet. Secretary of State,Robert Toombs, Ga. Secretary of Treasury,C. L. Memminger, S. C. Secretary of War,Leroy P. Walker, Ala. Secretary of the Navy,Stephen R. Mallory, Fla. Postmaster-General,John H. Reagan, Texas. Attorney-General,Judah P. Benjamin, La. members of Congress. Virginia.  James A. Seddon.  W. Ballard Preston. 1.R. M. T. Hunter. 2.John Tyler. 3.W. H. Macfarland. 4.Roger A. Pryor. 5.Thomas S. Bocock. 6.Wm. S. Rives. 7.Robert E. Scott. 8.James M. Mason. 9.J. Brockenbrough. 10.Chas. W. Russell. 11.Robert Johnston. 12.Walter Staples. 13.Walter Preston. North Carolina.  Geo. Davis.  W. W. Avery. 1.W. N. H. Smith. 2.Thomas Ruffin. 3.T. D. McDowell. 4.A. W. Venable. 5.J. M. Morehead. 6.R. C. Puryer. 7.Burton Craige. 8.E. A. Davidson. Alabama. 1.R. W. Walker. 2.R. H. Smith. 3.J. L. M. Curry. 4.W. P. Chilton. 5.S. F. Hale. 6.Collin S. McRae. 7.John Gill Shorter. 8.David P. Lewis. 9.Thomas Fearn. Florida. 1.Jackson
the limits of the Southern States; both are distinctly developed within the limits of Virginia; and there, whether we perceive the fact or not, the war already rages. In that State there are about five hundred thousand slaves to about one million of whites; and as at least as many slaves as masters are necessary to the constitution of slave society, about 500,000 of the white population are in legitimate relation to the slaves, and the rest are in excess. Hence we see the propriety of Mr. Mason's letter, in which he declared that all those who would not vote for secession must leave the State, and thereby you get clear of the excess of white population over slaves. They must emigrate. Like an excess of alkali or acid in chemical experiments, they are unfixed in the social compound. Without legitimate connection with the slave, they are in competition with him. The protest continues: And even in this State, (South Carolina,) the ultimate result is not determined. Th
ailure in duty; but now the time had come for him to reverse his judgment, which he did after their first repulse of the enemy. They fought like tigers, drove the enemy back, and followed up the advantage gained for a considerable distance. Captain Mason, Company C, was killed soon after his regiment was engaged. Lieutenant Purcell was mortally wounded. Major Porter and Colonel Merritt, gallantly cheering on their boys, escaped unharmed. The Kansas First and Second regiments were now orderith almost his last breath praised their behavior in glowing terms. Major Porter was all along the line, cheering his men forward, even when bullets fell like hail, and scores were dropping all around him. Companies B, under Lieut. Graham, C, Capt. Mason, who was killed soon after entering into action, F, Capt. Wise, H, Capt. Gottschalk, I, Capt. Herron, and K, Capt. Cook, were in the very thickest of the fight. The three latter were afterward placed in ambush by Capt. Granger of the regulars
ailure in duty; but now the time had come for him to reverse his judgment, which he did after their first repulse of the enemy. They fought like tigers, drove the enemy back, and followed up the advantage gained for a considerable distance. Captain Mason, Company C, was killed soon after his regiment was engaged. Lieutenant Purcell was mortally wounded. Major Porter and Colonel Merritt, gallantly cheering on their boys, escaped unharmed. The Kansas First and Second regiments were now orderith almost his last breath praised their behavior in glowing terms. Major Porter was all along the line, cheering his men forward, even when bullets fell like hail, and scores were dropping all around him. Companies B, under Lieut. Graham, C, Capt. Mason, who was killed soon after entering into action, F, Capt. Wise, H, Capt. Gottschalk, I, Capt. Herron, and K, Capt. Cook, were in the very thickest of the fight. The three latter were afterward placed in ambush by Capt. Granger of the regulars