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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 42 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 38 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 24 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 4 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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ong. Col. Hawkins with his three regiments was detailed to perform this work, leaving Gen. Reno with two regiments to bring up the rear, in order that we might get the enemy between our forces, when Gen. Reno anticipated no difficulty in making prisoners of them all. Col. Howard, of the Marine Artillery, and commander of the war-steamer Virginia, was also included in the expedition, with a battery of light field-pieces. Col. Hawkins's force embarked on the Phoenix, Capt. Ashcroft, Massasoit, Capt. Clark, Philadelphia, and Ocean Wave. All was in readiness by ten o'clock A. M., when the fleet left the island and proceeded slowly to the point where the troops were to be landed, which job was to be completed between twelve and one o'clock, before the moon rose, and as quietly as possible. When we arrived at our destination it was about ten o'clock in the evening, and quite as dark as necessary for all practical purposes. Preparations were at once made to land the force as
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most famous naval action of the Civil war (search)
making one last attempt to strike a telling blow with the Virginia and her consorts. On the night of January 23, 1865, he came down to the Federal obstructions and attempted to get by. When the movement was discovered, contrary to all expectations the great Onondaga retreated down the river. The moment might well have been one of the greatest anxiety for the Federals, but in maneuvering, the Virginia and the Richmond both got aground and the Onondaga, returning with the Hunchback and the Massasoit, inflicted some telling shots upon them. It was found later by a court-martial that Commander William A. Parker, commanding the division on the James, had made an error of judgment in handling the Onondaga. When day dawned the officers of the Merrimac, who expected that the remaining vessels of the fleet would soon be at their mercy, were surprised to see a strange-looking craft lying close under the towering sides of the Minnesota. They had been well informed of the plans and progres
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval actions along the shore (search)
finally lost his life. A plucky light-draft The navy ashore — crew of the foster with howitzers The gunboat Massasoit While the Federals with both army and navy closed in upon Richmond, heroic efforts were made by the Confederates tonor of capturing the British blockade-runner Deer off Charleston, February 18, 1865. In the center appears the gunboat Massasoit. In the last action that took place with the Confederate flotilla on the James, at Trent's Reach, January 24, 1865, it was the Massasoit that received the only damage from the guns of the hostile vessels and the battery at Howlett's house. In the two-hour action after the return of the Onondaga up-stream, five men on the Massasoit were wounded. She was one of theMassasoit were wounded. She was one of the third-class double-ender armored vessels and mounted ten guns. During this action she was commanded by Lieutenant G. W. Sumner, who displayed the utmost coolness and bravery in handling his vessel. The monitor Canonicus The movements of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massasoit, 1580- (search)
Massasoit, 1580- King of the Wampanoag Indians; born in the present limits of Massachusetts about 1580. h left only 300 persons alive. On March 15, 1621, Massasoit appeared at New Plymouth with sixty of his followettle behind. Leaving Winslow behind as a hostage, Massasoit approached with twenty armed warriors, and met Stauded, which was never broken by either party while Massasoit lived. The old sachem sent messengers to other tr Bradford sent two envoys (Winslow and Hopkins) to Massasoit, at Pokanoket, near Narraganset Bay, 40 miles fromople who had gathered around him, saying, Am not I Massasoit, commander of the country around you? Is not suchlive without a wife (for the Queen was then dead). Massasoit had just returned home, and had no food to offer t our lodging than of our journey. In 1623, when Massasoit was very sick, Winslow again visited him, and, in ards Narraganset Bay, he was kindly entertained by Massasoit for several weeks. A contemporary writer says the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Navy of the United States (search)
8)65Torpedo-boatS.850S.d2 Somers (No. 22)145Torpedo-boatS.1,900S.d2 Manly (No. 23)b30Torpedo-boatS.b250S.d1 Stiletto (No. 53)31Torpedo-boatW.359S.d2 Holland (No. 54)73Submarine torpedo-boatS.150S.d1 a, Secondary battery Accomac187TugI.250S.a2 Active286TugS.600S.a5 Alice356TugW.250S.a2 Apache650TugW.550S.a3 Chickasaw100TugI.....S.a1 Choctaw350TugI.188S.a3 Fortune450TugI.340S... Hercules198TugI.....S.a3 Iroquois702TugS.1,000S.a3 Iwana192TugS.300S... Leyden450TugI.340S... Massasoit202TugS.....S.a1 Modoc241TugI.....S... Ships of the Navy in 1901.—Continued. Name.Displacement (Tons).Type.Hull.Indicated Horse-Power.Propulsion.Guns (Main Battery) Mohawk420TugS.400S... Narkeeta192TugS.300S... Nezinscot156TugI.400S.a2 Nina357TugI.388S... Osceola571TugS.S......a2 Pawnee275TugW.250S... Pawtucket225TugS.450S... Penacook225TugS.450S... Piscataqua631TugS.1,600S.a4 Pontiac401Tug..425S.a3 Potomac667TugS.2,000S.a4 Powhatan194TugS.397S.a2 Rapido100TugI.70S
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Philip, King (search)
manual of King Philip. was at Mount Hope, at the same time offering to guide him to the place and help to kill him, for the sachem had killed his (the informant's) brother, and it was his duty to kill the murderer. This was the faithless Indian who shot Philip. The barbarous law of England that a traitor should be quartered was carried out in the case of Philip. Church's Indian executioner performed that service with his hatchet upon the dead body of the sachem. King Philip's War. Massasoit kept his treaty of friendship with the Plymouth Colony faithfully until his death. Philip assumed the covenants with the English on the death of his father and kept them inviolate a dozen years. As he saw spreading settlements reducing his domains, acre by acre, his hunting-grounds broken up, his fisheries diminished, and his nation menaced with servitude or annihilation, his patriotism was so violently aroused that he listened to his hot young warriors, who counselled war for the exter
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Plymouth, New (search)
r the huts at New Plymouth were half buried in snow-drifts. The Pilgrims trembled in fear of the surrounding Indians, but felt comforted by the voice of one of them as he went through the new village, crying, Welcome, Englishmen! Welcome, Englishmen! It was Samoset, who had learned a few English words from English sailors at Mohegan. He afterwards brought to New Plymouth Squanto, whom Hunt kidnapped. Squanto had returned, and through him an acquaintance and friendship were formed with Massasoit. The town lay on a slope; and when, six years after the arrival of the Mayflower, it was visited by Dutch commissioners, the houses were built of hewn timber, and the whole village was surrounded by a palisade of timbers driven into the ground and pointed at the top, a mile in circuit, and at the end of the streets were three gates made of strong beams. In the centre of the village was the governor's house, before which was a square enclosure bearing four mounted swivels. Upon an eminen
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Samoset, 1590- (search)
Samoset, 1590- Chief of the Pemaquid Indians; born in New England about 1590. In March, 1621, a naked Indian, who had learned a few words of English from the fishermen at Pemaquid, suddenly appeared in the streets of Plymouth, Mass., and startled the Pilgrims by the exclamation, Welcome, Englishmen! Welcome, Englishmen! He was Samoset, and gave them much information. He told them of the plague that had swept off the Indians about four years before, and that the place where they were seated was called Patuxet. He told them of Massasoit (q. v.). He brought to the settlement some of the friendly Indians, among them Squanto, whom Weymouth had kidnapped and given to Gorges. Squanto taught them how to plant maize, to catch a certain fish wherewith to manure their lands, and late in the season he guided ambassadors from Plymouth to the court of Massasoit at pokanoKet, afterwards Warren, R. I.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts (search)
.Feb. 21, 1621 Samoset, the first Indian to visit the colony, saying, Welcome, Englishmen! ......March 16, 1621 Massasoit, the grand sachem of the Wampanoags, with about sixty of his warriors, visits the colony......March 22, 1621 Treaty between the colony and Massasoit, which is faithfully observed for fifty-five years......March 22, 1621 John Carver unanimously confirmed as governor of the colony for the new civil year......March 23, 1621 Forty-four deaths in the colony in fd carry him aboard a ship bound for England, but finds him gone......December, 1635 Roger Williams finds refuge with Massasoit, the sachem of the Wampanoags, and commences a settlement at Seekonk, on the east side of Narragansett Bay; but learninssors allowed to be baptized; called the Half-way covenant ; adopted......1662 Metacomet, or Philip, youngest son of Massasoit, sachem of the Wampanoags and friend of the English, becomes sachem of the tribe on the death of his brother Alexander.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wampanoag, or Pokanoket, (search)
Wampanoag, or Pokanoket, Indians; one of the most powerful of the Massachusetts tribes of the Algonquian nation. Massasoit was their sachem when the English came to the New England shores. Their domain extended over nearly the whole of southern Massachusetts, from Cape Cod to Narraganset Bay, and at one time the tribe numbered 30,000. Just before the landing of the Pilgrims a terrible disease had reduced them to less than 1,000. While Massasoit lived the Wampanoags were friendly to the English; but a growing discontent ripened into war in 1675, led by King Philip, a son of Massasoit, which involved many of the New England Indians. The result was thived the Wampanoags were friendly to the English; but a growing discontent ripened into war in 1675, led by King Philip, a son of Massasoit, which involved many of the New England Indians. The result was the destruction of the tribe. King Philip's son, while yet a boy, with others, was sent to the West Indies and sold as a slave.
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