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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Early's Valley campaign. (search)
n unopposed march of an enemy through his country. It has been said that Early, at the head of his faithful band, hovering like an eagle about the columns of Sheridan, displayed more heroic valor than when at the head of his victorious army in Maryland. Among some of those whom superior rank has not brought into special notice are Colonels Carter (Acting Chief of Artillery), Nelson, King and Braxton; Majors Kirkpatrick and McLaughlin, of the artillery, distinguished at Winchester; Captains Massey, killed, and Carpenter, wounded; Colonel Pendleton, Adjutant-General of Early's corps, killed at Fisher's Hill while gallantly rallying the fugitives; Colonel Samuel Moore, Inspector-General of Early's corps; Colonel Green Peyton, Adjutant-General Rodes' division; Captain Lewis Randolph, of Rodes' staff; Colonel R. W. Hunter, Adjutant-General Gordon's division; Colonel Carr, Inspector-General Breckinridge's division, captured near Cross Keys, Valley of Virginia; Major Brethard, artiller
or 51 feet 1.95 inches. 1 fathom = 5.11629 feet, or 5 feet 1.395 inches. If a 28″ glass is used, and 8 divisions, then — 1 knot = 47 feet 9.024 inches. 1 fathom = 5 feet 11.627 inches. The line should be about 150 fathoms long, having 10 fathoms between the chip and first knot for strayline. Bowditch gives 6,120 feet in a sea-mile, which, if taken as the length, with a 28″ glass, will make the divisions 47.6 feet and 5.95 feet. Some logs, the earliest of which, perhaps, was Massey's, are actuated by wings on a rotating rod, which turns as the vessel passes through the water, operating, by means of an endless screw, a series of multiplying wheels, which register the total distance run between the time the log was thrown overboard and that at which it was taken from the water. These are only taken in when the ship's course is changed, or when the speed is below two or three knots per hour. They are somewhat liable to turn up missing, owing probably to their being bitt<
h the tube containing the line. This instrument consists of a delicately pivoted helix, which is turned by the action of the water, and registers the number of revolutions made on a series of dials. Two of these helices are employed, turning in opposite directions for the purpose of eliminating any error which might occur from the twisting of the line or other similar cause. Arrangements are provided for disconnecting the registering apparatus when the lead reaches bottom. The helix of Massey, such as that employed in his patent log, has also been used, but owing to its want of delicacy does not give as satisfactory results as those of Saxton's current meter. In sounding at extreme depths, it is not expected to recover the plummet, but arrangements are made for detaching the registering apparatus or the devices for obtaining specimens of bottom, which may then be hauled up with comparative ease and safety. It has been proposed to dispense with the sounding-line altogether,
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 11: the great revival along the Rapidan. (search)
owds of soldiers would gather around and humbly, but earnestly beg to relieve me. It was pleasant every day or two to meet Brothers Pritchard, Broaddus, Sr., and others, and compare notes. They will, doubtless, give you their impressions and experiences. Affectionately, Geo. B. Taylor. Staunton, September 23. Cumberland, September 23. Dear Brother Dickinson: I wish to give you a short account of a prayer-meeting to which I was invited, the 8th inst. This meeting was held with Captain Massey's Company (Company C), Nelson's Battalion, stationed near Gordonsville. When I arrived I found the brethren earnestly engaged in prayer. They were without preachers, but God had given them hearts to pray, and, in answer to their prayers, five of their comrades had professed faith in Christ. We continued the meetings six nights, with preaching, exhortation and prayer, at which time they were broken up by the demonstration made by the enemy at Culpeper Court House. Twenty-two professed
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
inia regiments. As Jackson reported in complimentary terms, it held this position against the assaults of the enemy with heroic gallantry, and when the flank was threatened, participated with Taliaferro's brigade in frustrating that hostile movement. The character of its service may be inferred from its losses, 35 killed and 140 wounded, about one-third of the aggregate Confederate casualties. Among the killed were Captains Dawson, Furlow, McMillan and Patterson, and Lieutenants Goldwire, Massey, Turpin and Woodward. Colonel Conner and Major Hawkins were complimented by honorable mention in General Johnson's report. This battle is especially worthy of note as the first of the series of victories that have joined forever the names of Stonewall Jackson and the Shenandoah valley. On the 30th, four companies of the Twelfth and a Louisiana regiment were severely handled at Front Royal by a brigade of Shields' division, losing Lieutenants Dixon and Waterman among the prisoners taken fro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2 (search)
march of an enemy through his country. It has been said that Early, at the head of his faithful band, hovering like an eagle about the columns of Sheridan, displayed more heroic valor than when at the head of his victorious army in Maryland. Among some of those whom superior rank has not brought into special notice are Colonels Carter (Acting Chief of Artillery), Nelson, King, Braxton, and Cutshaw; Majors Kirkpatrick and McLaughlin, of the artillery, distinguished at Winchester; Captains Massey, killed, and Carpenter, wounded; Captain Garber wounded at Berryville; Colonel Pendleton, Adjutant-General of Early's corps, killed at Fisher's Hill while gallantly rallying the fugitives; Colonel Samuel Moore, Inspector-General of Early's corps; Colonel Green Peyton, Adjutant-General Rodes' division; Captain Lewis Randolph, of Rodes' staff; Colonel R. W. Hunter, Adjutant-General Gordon's division; Colonel Carr, Inspector-General Breckinridge's division, captured near Cross Keys, Valley
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.44 (search)
e position known as Fisher's Hill, with its right resting on or near the Massanutta mountains, while the extreme left of his infantry line reached no further than the termination of the ridge of Fisher's Hill, in the direction of North mountain. The interval was protected only by a small body of cavalry. There may be some inaccuracies in the above description, but that was the situation as it appeared to me—a private soldier occupying the humble position of No. 6, or fuse-cutter, in Captain Massey's battery of artillery. While a private soldier's opportunity for knowing the general arrangement or disposition of the whole army at the commencement of or during an engagement is very limited, yet it must be confessed that the veterans of the Confederate army had all become generals in experience at the time of which I write. The battery to which I belonged was placed in position on the top of a high hill at the extreme left of the infantry line. The army having arrived on the gro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
ess than 1,000 left of the 2,850 who returned from Charleston in April, 1864, Less than half were paroled of 2,400 who charged at Howlett's. Their last, after fighting in nineteen battles, was their most glorious charge; and they fired the last guns of the infantry at Appomattox. Of this and other commands, Gloucester's dead were piled on every battle field: Page, Taylor, Fitzhugh, Puller, Ellis, Robins, Hibble, Baytop, Millers, Roane, Bridges, Banks, Norton, Amory, Cooke, Edwards, Griffin, Massey, Newcomb, Bristow, Jones, Barry, Ware, Simcoe, R. B. Jones, Kenan, Pitts, Pointer, Leigh, Jeff Dutton, Elijah Dutton, Vincent Edwards, Dunstan, Hughes, Evans, Cary, Thos. Robins, Freeman, John Roane, Jenkins, Hobday, Albert Roane, Ransome, White, J. W. Robins, Woodland, Cooper, Summerson, Williams, Hogg, Sparrow, T. J. Hibble, Alex. Dutton, John Edwards, Rich, Dutton again, Dunbar Edwards, Gwyn—I cease to call the roll, for they are absent by fifties and hundreds, and not a man answers to hi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.66 (search)
, 1862. Kincheloe, John W., living at Rectortown, Va. Kidwell, Evan, died since the war. Ladd, John A., badly wounded at Kelley's Island and lost sight of. Leslie, Thomas, died since the war. Long, Pendleton, died since the war. Lawler, Robert, died since the war. Lake, F. Marion, living in Missouri. Lake, Bladen, died with typhoid fever in 1862. Larkin, Richard, living in Prince William. Marlow, Richard, lost sight of him: Marlow, John, lost sight of him. Massey, Edward, died since the war. McClenigan, S. B., died since the war. Marshall, R. C., wounded at Trevillian's Depot. McArthur, Hickerson, living in Texas. Marshall, Tom, joined 12th Regiment. Marshall, Polk, joined 12th Regiment. Marshall, James, lost sight of him. Martin, Gibson, died since the war. Middleton, John, died since the war. Middleton, Campbell, living at Plains, Va. Milter, Proff, lost sight of; I think he is dead. Mitchell, James, killed in the
arrested, but as yet their fats is unknown. Messrs. Reynolds & Co., of Fort Scott; Messrs. Crawford & Co., of Chouteau's trading post, and other merchants in the Territory, have removed their goods to Missouri. [by Telegraph.] New York, Nov. 23. --A dispatch from Warsaw, Mo., published here, states that handbills were circulating there calling on the citizens to arm and resist Montgomery's raid, and cut the throats of his followers. A meeting had been held, and resolutions adopted calling on the President for assistance. The Governor of Missouri had taken prompt steps to protect his citizens on the Kansas border. A meeting at Leavenworth, K. T., had called on Gov. Medary, the Territorial Governor, for protection. The latest advices from Kansas City, Mo., say that Dr. Massey, who left Fort Scott on Tuesday, pronounces the report of the burning there to be untrue. Five men had been murdered by Montgomery, and others captured and probably killed.
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