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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 4 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 4 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army. You can also browse the collection for Alma Mater or search for Alma Mater in all documents.

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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 1: religious elements in the army. (search)
to the depot—all are soon aboard, and, amid tender farewells and suppressed sobs of anxious friends, and the waving of handkerchiefs and vociferous cheers by the vast crowd, those patriot-soldiers hurry forth at the bidding of their loved and honored Virginia. At Gordonsville they were met by companies from Augusta and Albemarle, and two companies of students from the University of Virginia, who marched forth from those classic shades to illustrate a bright page in the history of their Alma Mater. Orange, Culpeper and other counties along the route swelled their numbers as they rushed to the capture of Harper's Ferry and the defence of the border. The call of Virginia now echoes through the land—from seaboard to mountain-valley, from Alleghany to Chesapeake, from the Potomac to the North Carolina border, the tramp of her sons is heard. Maryland, the Carolinas, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Louisiana, Missouri and Texas catch the sound
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 4: influence of Christian officers—concluded. (search)
m on that day. In 1871 Rev. John Lipscomb Johnson, B. A., of the University of Virginia (for the past fourteen years professor of English in the University of Mississippi), published a volume of 765 pages, containing sketches of nearly two hundred alumni of the University of Virginia who fell in the War between the States, and even then a number of names were omitted for lack of proper information. In eagerly reading these pages, in which Dr. Johnson has done a graceful service to his Alma Mater, which should be gratefully remembered, I have been struck with the fact that a very large proportion of these men were humble, useful Christians; and I might appropriately transfer to this book a number of these sketches as beautifully illustrating Christ in the Camp. The same may be said of the Virginia Military Institute Memorial volume prepared by Rev. C. D. Walker, and containing sketches of one hundred and seventy of its alumni who fell in the struggle for Southern independence. A