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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Dabney Maury or search for Dabney Maury in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fighting that was close by us. (search)
tline may answer for immediate requirements. (Vol. 36, Part 2, War Records, p. 213). General Ranson adds on a postscript that on taking the breastworks, five stand of colors, one brigadier-general and about 400 prisoners were captured. As the official reports of the battle at Drewry's Bluff, of May 16, 1864, do not state what particular part was taken by the brigades of Ransom's Division, other than a few references of the major-general commanding, the differences between Gracie's men and those of Colonel Terry cannot be settled by these reports. Captain Sumpter's account is from a soldier of worthy service, and from a man whose testimony is known by all who knew him to be reliable. There are doubtless officers and men still living who were participants in the action of Kemper's brigate at Drewry's Bluff, and one of them, Colonel Maury, of the twenty-fourth Virginia, is now living in Richmond, where he is well known. A statement from him would be welcomed. John W. Daniel.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Who captured Heckman's Brigade? (search)
lead in the ground, thinking we were on a level. Colonel Terry, finding that their line was weak on their right, ordered the First and Seventh forward. We charged them, doubled them up, and came sweeping up the line. As we were only about thirty steps from the enemy's line, we could plainly hear the enemy yelling out to stop shooting, that they were friends, but they soon found that the boys in gray had them, and right then and there Buck Terry's boys captured Heckman's Brigade. Colonel Maury was in command of the Twenty-fourth Virginia in that fight, and he and the gallant Richmond boys of the old First Virginia, I think, will corroborate my statement. I do not know what became of the Alabamians, but suppose they were somewhere on the line doing their duty and fighting as Alabamians know how and always did. But they did not capture Heckman's Brigade. Terry's Brigade did that—the First, Seventh, Eleventh and Twenty-fourth Virginia—and on the 17th marched through Richmond wi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
tock, then so important for us to hold at all hazards. There was some criticism of my conduct of this battle by General Dabney Maury many years afterwards in the Richmond Tines, based, I think, upon information furnished him by a man whose name I ly elsewhere at the moment, I did not place him under arrest, as I should have done. I should never have replied to General Maury's article and should have passed it by in silence, for General Maury had no just foundations for his criticisms, but General Maury had no just foundations for his criticisms, but meeting with General Fitzhugh Lee, who was a warm friend of mine, he, knowing all the circumstances of the engagement at the bridge, advised me not to let Gen. Maury's article go unnoticed, and I replied, though then as now, I think we had enough toGen. Maury's article go unnoticed, and I replied, though then as now, I think we had enough to do to fight the enemy. Having been wounded and captured nearby the intrepid Armistead in the heroic charge where he led the remnant of Pickett's Division over the stone wall at Gettysburg; having been honored with this independant command after e
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
08. Lee, Gen. Fitz., 35. Lee, Gen R. E. 21, 31. Lee Gen. W. H. F., 35, 69. Lincoln dejected at Lee's escape, 75; course of, inconsistent, 362. McAlwee, G. W. 354. McAnerny, Capt. John, 200. McBirney, Major, 19. McCabe, Capt. W. Gordon, 61. McLaws, Gen. L., 108. Mallet Lt. Col. J. W., 1. Malvern Hill, Battle of, 357. Manassas 8th Virginia at Second, 313. Marshall, Col. Charles 34, 323. Marylanders in the C. S. Army, 235. Massey, Col. E. C., 164. Maury, Gen. D. H., 324. Meade, General, 104. Memorial Day, Origin of. 368. Memorial Sermon in Old St. John's Church, 338. Minor, Lieut. R. D., 50. Morrison. Col. E. M., 319. Mosby Col. John S., 21, 34, 210; Unjust strictures by, 230, 269. Munford's Marylauders never surrendered 309. Murdaugh, John D. 39. Murdaugh, Capt. Wm. H., 39. Nitre and Mining Bureau, 11. Oates, Col., of the 50th Ala., 128. O'Conor Chas., the first to lead for defence of Jefferson Davis, 245