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Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 40 2 Browse Search
Fannie A. Beers, Memories: a record of personal exeperience and adventure during four years of war. 19 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 23, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Matthew F. Maury or search for Matthew F. Maury in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The First Marine torpedoes were made in Richmond, Va., and used in James river. (search)
st of sailors and patriots in the Confederate service, torpedoes were first successfully utilized in actual war by the Confederate navy, whose example in this and other respects has been imitated by every maritime nation. The writer of the Tribune article in stating torpedoes were Successfully employed but two or three times during the Confederate war shows great ignorance. They were successfully employed every hour of every day in every river and harbor in the South from the time Captain Maury first placed them in James River (1861) until the end of the war, in that their presence, successfully kept the Federal fleet from entering our many undefended rivers and harbors from Virginia to Texas. It suggested that a torpedo which successfully keeps away many ships is far more successfully used than if it had been successfully exploded and destroyed one. But such was by no means the only successful use of Confederate torpedoes, for they were also successfully employed in the ac