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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 7: the Peninsula Campaign. (search)
s obvious, I say, that McClellan did learn the lesson we intended; for after Williamsburg our army was allowed to pursue its march very leisurely up the peninsula — a considerable part of it stopping to finish the reenlistment and reorganization by the election of new officers. But it is not a satisfactory battle to contemplate, because the administering of this lesson cost too much in blood, and this because, as so often happens, some one blundered. Col. Richard L. Maury-son of Commodore M. F. Maury-and an exceptionally intelligent officer, who at the close of the fight commanded the Twenty-fourth Virginia, Early's old regiment, the colonel and lieutenant-colonel having been shot down — has written a brief but strong memoir on this battle, from which it would seem well nigh impossible to draw any other conclusions. He makes substantially the following points: General Magruder had built, and was commended for building, a chain of redoubts across the Peninsula from the Yor
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Index. (search)
d, 223; mentioned, 129, 165, 168-69, 173- 79, 182, 192, 222-24, 231, 270 Machine guns, 76-77. Magruder, John Bankhead, 75, 79-80, 94-97, 102, 107, 160 Mahone, William, 311 Malvern Hill, 41, 96-97, 101-18, 130, 146, 309 Manassas, Va.: first battle of, 41, 44- 48, 59, 111, 324; second battle of, 118-24, 191 Manly's Battery (N. C.), 154, 168, 301, 310 Marse Robert, 18-21. Marshall, Charles, 226 Mascots, 170-72. Massachusetts Infantry: 20th Regiment, 130 Maury, Matthew Fontaine, 79 Maury, Richard Launcelot, 79 Meade, George Gordon: Lee's comments on, 227-28; mentioned, 207, 222, 237, 288 Mechanicsville, Va., 93-94. Northern civilians, 200-206. Northerners in Confederate service, 37-44. Observation tower, 310 Orange County, Va., 120, 355-56. Owen, William Benton, 139-45, 176-79. Pegram, John, 110, 232-33. Pegram, William Johnson, 53, 57, 109-10. Pegram's Artillery Battalion, 41, 57, 110 Pelham, John, 53, 109 Pender, William Do
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maury, Matthew Fontaine 1806-1873 (search)
Maury, Matthew Fontaine 1806-1873 Scientist; born in Spottsylvania county, Va., June 14, 1806; entered the navy as midshipman in 1825, and while circumnavigating the globe began his treatise on Navigation. An accident in 1839 made him a permanent cripple, and he was placed in charge of the Hydrographic Office at Washington. On its union with the Naval Observatory, in 1844, he became its superintendent. He made extensive researches concerning the physical geography of the sea, and published an interesting work on the subject. He also made extensive investigations regarding the Gulf Stream. In 1861 he resigned his appointments from the government and espoused the cause of the Confederacy. In 1871 he was made president of the University of Alabama. His scientific works gained for him distinguished honors from foreign governments and many learned societies. He died in Lexington, Va., Feb. 1, 1873.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Peace party. (search)
r holding as a conquered province any sovereign State now or lately one of the United States. To this John C. Breckinridge added, or to abolish slavery therein. From the beginning of the Civil War there was a faction, composed of the disloyal politicians of the opposition, who used every means in their power to embarrass the government. They affiliated with the Knights of the Golden circle (q. v.), and, like the peace faction in 1812-15, they were practical enemies of their country. Matthew F. Maury, formerly superintendent of the National Observatory, in a letter to the London Times (Aug. 17, 1863), said, in proof that there was no chance for the preservation of the Union, There is already a peace party in the North. All the embarrassments with which that party can surround Mr. Lincoln, and all the difficulties that it can throw in the way of the war party in the North, operate directly as so much aid and comfort to the South. The faction issued many publications in furtherance
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of General Dabney H. Maury at the Reunion of Confederate veterans, Maury camp, no. 2, Fredericksburg, Va., August 23, 1883. (search)
old house of Chatham. And I tell you that the lessons he learned there, as he stood a barefooted boy at his mother's knee, did more to make him the great, good knight he was, than all the teachings of the schools. Hard by, Maury, that Matthew Fontaine Maury, whose name your encampment bears, first drew his breath, and in this town began his work, which has filled the world with wonder. Here, too, Lewis Herndon lived, that noble Captain, who, gentle as Sydney, forgot himself to save others mountain ranges of thought and of honor. This duty done, we can say with a loftier pride than the Roman Citizen, I am a Virginian. And I will briefly sketch to my younger hearers the career of him whose name your Encampment bears: Matthew Fontaine Maury was born in Spotsylvania county, January 14, 1806. In 1811 his father moved with his family and slaves to a cotton plantation near Franklin, Tennessee. In 1824, Captain John Minor Maury, the oldest son, died while serving against the pi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.47 (search)
n war and in peace. He was a son of Captain John Minor Maury, United States Navy, and a nephew of the great Commodore Matthew Fontaine Maury, the geographer of the seas, and probably more esteemed and honored in other countries than any American scientist who ever lived. General Maury's father died of yellow fever in the West Indies in 1828. Commodore Maury became the guardian of his dead brother's two sons—William Lewis and Dabney—and to the day of his death General Maury spoke of his uncle Commodore Maury became the guardian of his dead brother's two sons—William Lewis and Dabney—and to the day of his death General Maury spoke of his uncle as having been to him all that a father could have been. William Lewis Maury died at the age of twenty. General Maury grew up at Fredericksburg, where he received his preparatory education, and when quite young entered the University of VirginiaGeneral Maury spoke of his uncle as having been to him all that a father could have been. William Lewis Maury died at the age of twenty. General Maury grew up at Fredericksburg, where he received his preparatory education, and when quite young entered the University of Virginia. He graduated in the A. B. course, and also took the junior course in law. He prosecuted his law studies at Fredericksburg under the celebrated Judge Lomax, but he finally determined that the law was not to his liking, and applied for, and receiv
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.50 (search)
memo. Some efficient and providential service by Captain Zimmer, in securing from New York at personal hazard, percussion caps, which were essential for use in the first battle of Manassas, is given under the caption A Secret Service Episode,Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. XXVIII, pp. 14-18. Zimmer was entrusted by the Advisory Council of War, which in 1861 was composed of Governor John Letcher, Lieutenant-Governor Robert L. Montague (father of our present Executive); Commodore Matthew Fontaine Maury, State Senator Thomas S. Haymond (later of West Virginia), Colonel (later Major-General) Francis H. Smith, Superintendent Virginia Military Institute, Captain Robert B. Pegram, C. S. Navy, and perhaps others. The private secretary of Governor Letcher, Colonel S. Bassett French, acted as Secretary of the Board. Of the proceedings of this Board of War, so able in its constitutional personnel, and which would be so informatory as to early appointments, only those of the early mon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War officers of the First regiment Virginia volunteer infantry, (search)
memo. Some efficient and providential service by Captain Zimmer, in securing from New York at personal hazard, percussion caps, which were essential for use in the first battle of Manassas, is given under the caption A Secret Service Episode,Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. XXVIII, pp. 14-18. Zimmer was entrusted by the Advisory Council of War, which in 1861 was composed of Governor John Letcher, Lieutenant-Governor Robert L. Montague (father of our present Executive); Commodore Matthew Fontaine Maury, State Senator Thomas S. Haymond (later of West Virginia), Colonel (later Major-General) Francis H. Smith, Superintendent Virginia Military Institute, Captain Robert B. Pegram, C. S. Navy, and perhaps others. The private secretary of Governor Letcher, Colonel S. Bassett French, acted as Secretary of the Board. Of the proceedings of this Board of War, so able in its constitutional personnel, and which would be so informatory as to early appointments, only those of the early mon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
ccupied Atlanta, Hood lying some distance to the southwest; Farragut had forced the defenses of Mobile bay, capturing Fort Morgan, etc., and the Federals held Pensacola, but had made no movement into the interior. The closing scenes. Major-General Maury commanded the Confederate forces garrisoning Mobile and adjacent works, with Commodore Farrand, Confederate Navy, in charge of several armed vessels. Small bodies of troops were stationed at different points through the Department, and inued into Georgia. General Canby, commanding the Union armies in the Southwest, advanced up the eastern shore of Mobile bay, and invested Spanish Fort and Blakely, important Confederate works in that quarter. After repulsing an assault, General Maury, in accordance with instructions, withdrew his garrison in the night to Mobile, and then evacuated the city, falling back to Meridian, on the line of the Mobile and Ohio Railway. General Forrest was drawn to the same point, and the little arm
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Passing of the monitor Scorpion. (search)
llock to England to superintend their construction. The contract price was £ 93,750 or about $468,750 apiece. One was to be completed in March, 1863, and the other in May of the same year. They were known while undergoing construction as El Tousson and El Mounassir. There was some delay in the work, and it was not until May 27, 1863, that the Confederate officers who were to man the new boats ran the blockade at Charleston, S. C., and started for England. Those in the party were Matthew F. Maury, John R. Hamilton, Captain Littlepage, Dan Trigg, H. H. Marmaduke and Captain James North. Captain Bullock was to command one of monitors and Captain North the other. The party were beached at Eleuthera Island for two days. Then a wrecking vessel came to their relief and towed their ship to Nassau. They arrived in England in August. The agents of the United States government in England found out the intentions of the Confederates in regard to the Laird monitors and reported the m
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