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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Matthew Fontaine Maury or search for Matthew Fontaine Maury in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maury, Matthew Fontaine 1806-1873 (search)
Maury, Matthew Fontaine 1806-1873 Scientist; born in Spottsylvania county, Va., June 14, 1806; entered the navy as midshipman in 1825, and while circumnavigating the globe began his treatise on Navigation. An accident in 1839 made him a permanent cripple, and he was placed in charge of the Hydrographic Office at Washington. On its union with the Naval Observatory, in 1844, he became its superintendent. He made extensive researches concerning the physical geography of the sea, and published an interesting work on the subject. He also made extensive investigations regarding the Gulf Stream. In 1861 he resigned his appointments from the government and espoused the cause of the Confederacy. In 1871 he was made president of the University of Alabama. His scientific works gained for him distinguished honors from foreign governments and many learned societies. He died in Lexington, Va., Feb. 1, 1873.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Peace party. (search)
r holding as a conquered province any sovereign State now or lately one of the United States. To this John C. Breckinridge added, or to abolish slavery therein. From the beginning of the Civil War there was a faction, composed of the disloyal politicians of the opposition, who used every means in their power to embarrass the government. They affiliated with the Knights of the Golden circle (q. v.), and, like the peace faction in 1812-15, they were practical enemies of their country. Matthew F. Maury, formerly superintendent of the National Observatory, in a letter to the London Times (Aug. 17, 1863), said, in proof that there was no chance for the preservation of the Union, There is already a peace party in the North. All the embarrassments with which that party can surround Mr. Lincoln, and all the difficulties that it can throw in the way of the war party in the North, operate directly as so much aid and comfort to the South. The faction issued many publications in furtherance