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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Matthew Fontaine Maury or search for Matthew Fontaine Maury in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.47 (search)
n war and in peace. He was a son of Captain John Minor Maury, United States Navy, and a nephew of the great Commodore Matthew Fontaine Maury, the geographer of the seas, and probably more esteemed and honored in other countries than any American scientist who ever lived. General Maury's father died of yellow fever in the West Indies in 1828. Commodore Maury became the guardian of his dead brother's two sons—William Lewis and Dabney—and to the day of his death General Maury spoke of his uncle Commodore Maury became the guardian of his dead brother's two sons—William Lewis and Dabney—and to the day of his death General Maury spoke of his uncle as having been to him all that a father could have been. William Lewis Maury died at the age of twenty. General Maury grew up at Fredericksburg, where he received his preparatory education, and when quite young entered the University of VirginiaGeneral Maury spoke of his uncle as having been to him all that a father could have been. William Lewis Maury died at the age of twenty. General Maury grew up at Fredericksburg, where he received his preparatory education, and when quite young entered the University of Virginia. He graduated in the A. B. course, and also took the junior course in law. He prosecuted his law studies at Fredericksburg under the celebrated Judge Lomax, but he finally determined that the law was not to his liking, and applied for, and receiv