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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 28 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 9, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 9 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 4 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 8 6 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 15, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Maury or search for Maury in all documents.

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demonstration from the north on central Alabama, to attempt the reduction of Mobile and its remaining defenses, See page 650. now held, under Dick Taylor, by Gen. Maury, with a force estimated at 15,000 men. The forces employed by Gen. Canby consisted of the 13th and 16th corps aforesaid, with a division of cavalry and one oebels lay stretched beside them. Mobile was lost and won. It could no longer be held; so its evacuation commenced on the 10th, and was completed on the 11th. Gen. Maury fled up the Alabama, with 9,000 men, leaving 4,000 prisoners in our hands; while 1,000 more were found in the city, when, at 2 P. M. of the 12th, the flag of th and one transport — all sunk by torpedoes. The guns captured in the city and its defenses numbered 150. The powerful rams Huntsville and Tuscaloosa were sunk by Maury before the evacuation. The Rebel ram W. H. Webb, from Red river, freighted with cotton, rosin, &c., came down the Mississippi past New Orleans April 24. so
e into, and proclamation, 193-4. Maryland Heights, held by Ford, 196; prisoners and guns captured at, 202. Mason, J, M., allusion to, 81. Massachusetts volunteers killed in Baltimore, 514. Mathews, Col. Stanley, routs Wheeler, 272. Maury, Gen., defends Mobile, 721; his retreat and losses, 724. Max Meadows, Gillem destroys railroad at, 688. McArthur, Gen., at Corinth, 226. McCall, Gen., at Gaines's Mill, 155; at Malvern Hill, 562; taken prisoner, 563. McCallum, Gen. D., 220. Mitchellsville, Morgan's raid on, 271. Mix, Col. S. H., killed at Petersburg, Va., 585. Mobile Bay, the fight in, 641; the outer defenses of, 649; map of the defenses of, 650. Mobile, Ala., preparations for attack on, 721; 722; Maury abandons, 724. Monitor, arrival of the, at Fortress Monroe, 118; fight of, with the Merrimac, 118; 119. Monocacy, Lew Wallace defeated at the, 603. Monroe, John T., Mayor of New Orleans, refuses to surrender the city, 95-6; his letters t