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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 28 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 9, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 9 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 4 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 8 6 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 15, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Maury or search for Maury in all documents.

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at home, but on the road directing our march. The retreat, made in the face of a foe outnumbering us by odds, was, perhaps, more brilliant than a victory; and General Maury, whose division brought up the rear, deserves the highest honor for the skill and courage displayed under circumstances so perilous. The enemy pressed our rear all day on the twenty-sixth, until General Maury placed a battery commanding the road, and as their cavalry closed upon us, sent a volley into their ranks, which settled the sardines of about sixty of them, and taught them caution the balance of the route. During the entire retreat we lost but four or five wagons, which broke le force of the rebels in Mississippi, save a few garrisons and a small reserve, attacked you. They were commanded by Van Dorn, Price, Villipigue, Rust, Armstrong, Maury, and others, in person. They numbered, according to their own authorities, nearly forty thousand men — almost double your own numbers. You fought them into the p
aim, as we judged, at the headquarters of General Price, but the old hero was not at home, but on the road directing our march. The retreat, made in the face of a foe outnumbering us by odds, was, perhaps, more brilliant than a victory; and General Maury, whose division brought up the rear, deserves the highest honor for the skill and courage displayed under circumstances so perilous. The enemy pressed our rear all day on the twenty-sixth, until General Maury placed a battery commanding thGeneral Maury placed a battery commanding the road, and as their cavalry closed upon us, sent a volley into their ranks, which settled the sardines of about sixty of them, and taught them caution the balance of the route. During the entire retreat we lost but four or five wagons, which broke down on the road and were left. Acts of vandalism disgraceful to the army were, however, perpetrated along the road, which made me blush to own such men as my countrymen. Corn-fields were laid waste, potato-patches robbed, barn-yards and smoke-h
fought. I have now received the reports of the various commanders. I have now to tell you that the magnitude of the stake, the battle, and the results, become more than ever apparent. Upon the issue of the fight depended the possession of West-Tennessee, and perhaps even the fate of operations in Kentucky. The entire available force of the rebels in Mississippi, save a few garrisons and a small reserve, attacked you. They were commanded by Van Dorn, Price, Villipigue, Rust, Armstrong, Maury, and others, in person. They numbered, according to their own authorities, nearly forty thousand men — almost double your own numbers. You fought them into the position we desired on the third, punishing them terribly; and on the fourth, in three hours after the infantry entered into action they were completely beaten. You killed and buried one thousand four hundred and twenty-three officers and men, some of their most distinguished officers falling, among whom was the gallant Col. Rogers