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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 78 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 64 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 62 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 53 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 35 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 30 4 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 29 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 27 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Dabney H. Maury or search for Dabney H. Maury in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fifth annual meeting of the Southern Historical Society, October 31st., 1877. (search)
but touchinly-appropriate tribute to the memory of Admiral Raphael Semmes, late Vice-President of the Society for the State of Alabama, and, on motion of General Dabney H. Maury, the following minute was unanimously adopted: The death of Admiral Raphael Semmes, the Vice-President of this Society for the State ot Alabama, havingto be entered on the Journal. Fifth annual report of the Executive Committee of the Southern Historical Society, for year Ending October 31st, 1877. General D. H. Maury then read the following. The Executive Committee have to report that during the past year they have endeavored to keep in view the great objects of thetitutional freedom, and we earnestly appeal to all who can add anything of value to our collection, to do so at once. By order of the Executive Committee. Dabney H. Maury, Chairman. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary. The report was unanimously adopted. The President then announced the selection of General E. W. Pettus, of Selma,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
immense wagon-train passing, said to belong to Johnson's division. At 2:30 A. M., July 2d, we took the road, (both battalions,) and by an easy march reached the neighborhood of Gettysburg about sun-up; halting in an open field, the command got breakfast, and 1 was sent to report the presence of the artillery reserve of Longstreet's corps on the field and ready for battle. I found General Longstreet on Seminary Hill with General Lee and Generals Heth and A. P. Hill, and Doctors Cullen and Maury, surgeons. Upon making my report, Gen. Longstreet ordered that the battalions be kept where they were until further orders. On the morning of the third of July, at day-light, the batteries of the First corps were all in position, extending from Hood, in front of the Round Top, to and beyond the peach orchard. At this point General Longstreet sent for rie, accompanied by Adjutant Owen. I rode to the rear of the line, where we found Gen. Longstreet in consultation with the general office
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Grant as a soldier and Civilian. (search)
Grant as a soldier and Civilian. by General Dabney H. Maury. The war which placed General Grant in the high position he so lately occupied, is so recent and was so fierce, that it is natural his contemporaries should entertain opinions widely different as to the conduct and capacity of the successful general who ended it. Even European critics have been affected by the flood of military reports which have been poured forth by the able and ingenious historians who accompained the Northern armies-and their discrimination has been dazzled by the glare of the great results accomplished by General Grant-so that they oftentimes seem to overestimate his capacities as a commander. On the other hand, it has been difficult for the conquered people of the South to recognize the virtues or even to admit the high capacities which may be found in the leaders who have wrought us so much evil. But there are indications of a returning sense of justice in the factions so lately arrayed ag
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
se last words were: I have done my duty, and now I turn to my Savior ; John H. Pegram, whose brave young life was sacrificed at the post of duty he always coveted; General Ed. Johnson, who so loved to go in with the boys, musket in hand; General Henry A. Wise, the fearless tribune of the people, who claimed no exemption from hardship and danger on account of his age or long service; Colonel D. B. Harris, Beauregard's great engineer officer, whose merit was only equalled by his modesty ; Commodore Maury, whose brave devotion to the right was not eclipsed by his world-wide fame as a scientist, and many other men of mark whom we may not now even mention. The following beautiful letter from ex-President Davis was read at the recent laying of the corner-stone of the Confederate monument at Macon, Ga., and so appropriately gives voice to the sentiments of the people of the South generally that we print it in full: Mississippi City, Miss., April 11, 1878. Gentlemen: I sincerely re