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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 78 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 64 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 62 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 53 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 35 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 30 4 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 29 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 27 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Dabney H. Maury or search for Dabney H. Maury in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ich we printed in the Southern Magazine and shall reprint hereafter), settle the question beyond peradventure, and we cannot conceive that partizan influence can prevail on Congress to grant this absurd claim of the crew of the Monitor. General D. H. Maury has given a summary of the facts in the following letter addressed to Senator Johnston: Letter from General Maury. office of the Southern Historical Society, November, 1882. Senator John W. Johnston, of Virginia . Dear Sir,—At your eye-witnesses and actors in these events of high authority, and are drawn from carefully prepared narratives and reports in the office of the Southern Historical Society in the capitol of Virginia. With high respect your obedient servant, Dabney H. Maury, Chairman Executive Committeee S. H S. Midshipman Littlepage who was on the Merrimac, furnished the following to the Washington Post. Statement of midshipman Littlepage. To the Editor of The Post.—From the article which appeared in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Merrimac and Monitor. (search)
ich we printed in the Southern Magazine and shall reprint hereafter), settle the question beyond peradventure, and we cannot conceive that partizan influence can prevail on Congress to grant this absurd claim of the crew of the Monitor. General D. H. Maury has given a summary of the facts in the following letter addressed to Senator Johnston: Letter from General Maury. office of the Southern Historical Society, November, 1882. Senator John W. Johnston, of Virginia . Dear Sir,—At your eye-witnesses and actors in these events of high authority, and are drawn from carefully prepared narratives and reports in the office of the Southern Historical Society in the capitol of Virginia. With high respect your obedient servant, Dabney H. Maury, Chairman Executive Committeee S. H S. Midshipman Littlepage who was on the Merrimac, furnished the following to the Washington Post. Statement of midshipman Littlepage. To the Editor of The Post.—From the article which appeared in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
ite Andromache and Astyanax would have been gracing in marble some princely saloon, instead of having to wait in the moulder's clay for an order? Is it putting it too strongly to declare that replicas of his inimitable Knowledge is Power (a sleeping negro boy with his dropping book), or his marvelous production, the saucy, good-for-naught Nations Ward, would be in every large gallery of representative art? The hand that modeled the recumbent figure of Lee, and gave us the portrait busts of Maury, Stuart, and others, would not be suffered, surely to let its skill lie dormant for lack of commissions. If England with her supercilious opinion so often expressed, that Art is yet crude in America, can afford to praise this master-piece of the Richmond sculptor, having no better or truer idea of it than mere photographs can give—if Roman critics have words of commendation for Ezekiel's Christ, and his Religious Liberty— where is our pride in the genius of our sons, that we do not do vast
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
street; John B. Piet, 174 West Baltimore street; Baltimore News Company, Sun Iron Building; West & Johnston, Richmond, Va.; W. H. Moore Son, 475 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington; Page Courier, Luray, Page county, Va. This book has been too long before the public to need any commendation from us; but surely the fact that the few remaining copies will be sold for the benefit of the orphan children of the gallant soldier, will cause them to be bought up at once. 1861 vs. 1882. Co. Aytch, Maury's Grays, first Tenn. Reg't, or A side show of the Big show. By Sam. R. Wat-Kins, Columbia, Tenn. We say nothing as to its literary merits, or the taste of some things in it, but we do not hesitate to advise all who want a picture of the private Confederate soldier as he was, in camp, on the march, in the bivouac, on the battle-field, in the hospital—to send $1.50 to the author at Columbia, Tenn., and procure a copy of this book. Some of the pictures of soldier life are very vividly draw
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The annual meeting of the Southern Historical Society. (search)
f the work of the Society, and the obligations of our people to sustain it. Colonel R. L. Maury explained that the chairman of the Executive Committee, General Dabney H. Maury, was in New York, where he was detained by business, and read from him the following letter: Letter of General Maury. Gentlemen of the HistoricaGeneral Maury. Gentlemen of the Historical Society,—I have the honor to submit to you the reports of the Secretary and Treasurer of our Society. They show a balance in our treasury of $4,633.42 of the endowment fund. The endowment fund has been given to us for the preservation of our archives. We need at once a fire-proof office, and we will use all efforts to protates. This done, the great work and object we have so long striven for will be complete. I am, gentlemen, with warmest regards, your friend and comrade, Dabney H. Maury, Chairman Executive Committee. The Secretary of the Society (Dr. J. William Jones) then read the report of the Executive Committee, which had been unanim
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of General Dabney H. Maury at the Reunion of Confederate veterans, Maury camp, no. 2, Fredericksburg, Va., August 23, 1883. (search)
Address of General Dabney H. Maury at the Reunion of Confederate veterans, Maury camp, no. 2, Fredericksburg, Va., August 23, 1883. Ladies, Comrades, and Fellow-Citizens: As I look upon these once familiar scenes, sad and sweet memories throng about me. More than sixty years have passed since first I saw the light in FrederickMaury camp, no. 2, Fredericksburg, Va., August 23, 1883. Ladies, Comrades, and Fellow-Citizens: As I look upon these once familiar scenes, sad and sweet memories throng about me. More than sixty years have passed since first I saw the light in Fredericksburg; and with them have passed away, one by one, my dearest and best loved of my youth, till now all who made my boyhood's home have crossed over the river, and are beckoning me to follow. Along this valley, where for many generations my people have lived and died, nothing of them now remains but their names upon their graves.ed there, as he stood a barefooted boy at his mother's knee, did more to make him the great, good knight he was, than all the teachings of the schools. Hard by, Maury, that Matthew Fontaine Maury, whose name your encampment bears, first drew his breath, and in this town began his work, which has filled the world with wonder.