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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
ir retorts. Said Himes, alluding modestly to his wish to be always acting, though only effecting a little, I am but a cipher, but I keep always on the slate. Yes, said W. L. G., and always on the right side. [S. J.] May, whose extra care to be candid led some new-organized ones to fancy he was going to join them, took occasion to explain his position. Said he: One asked me the other day if I was going to Chardon-St. Chapel [i. e., to the reception to Phillips and Collins]. —Yes.—Why, Mr. May, I heard you were leaving the old party.—Who told you so?—Many people.—Well, said Samuel, when I am going to be myself the first to tell it. When I leave W. L. G., I'll tell him so first. Good, was it not? You'd say so if you had seen the noble, calm, wholesouled speaker. The family Lib. 11.127. circle of the abolitionists was now complete; discouragement gave way to hopeful, harmonious action, in which the organizing skill and Herculean powers of despatch Lib. 11.139. of the man wh
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
ention, I doubt not. The movement has made a great stir in the community, and especially among the devouter sort of Unitarians! Lib. 18.22. The Call for an Anti-Sabbath Convention in Boston had Ms. Jan. 8, 1848, Thos. McClintock to W. L. G. Ms. Jan. 10, 1848. begun to be sent out for signatures late in December, 1847. The author of it advised S. J. May that it had been drawn up with great care and deliberation, and sanctioned by a large committee of our best reformatory spirits; but Mr. May could not yield entire sympathy or allow his name to be appended. I am sorry, he responded on January Ms. to W. L. G. 15, 1848, you are going to have a Convention, because it will help rather than hinder the project of the Sabbatarians. Opposition will give importance to their doings. He thought the Sabbath laws were a dead-letter. Theodore Parker, however, as in the time of the Ante, 2.422-426. ChardonStreet Convention, was less disturbed than his Unitarian brother: Theodore P
foolish, but, at the same time, you are obliged to admit that he is bolder and honester than you are. Lib. 26.133. The editor of the Liberator was beset with inquiries as to Lib. 26:[142], 162. his attitude towards the Republican Party, often from members of it who hoped he would disavow it, in order that the party might disavow him. His replies left no Lib. 26:[142]. room for ambiguity. In a long article, reviewing the Lib. 26:[146]. duty of abolitionists under the temptation to which Mr. May had succumbed, he held them to the fundamental principle of the disunion position, with this admission: As against Buchanan and Fillmore, it seems to us, the sympathies and best wishes of every enlightened friend of freedom must be on the side of Fremont; so that if there were no moral barrier to our voting, and we had a million votes to bestow, we should cast them all for the Republican candidate. Returning to the subject in a later issue, he said: What, then, is our duty as abolit