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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 72 4 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 71 5 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Samuel Joseph May or search for Samuel Joseph May in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
N. H.), on September 4, followed close upon the mobbing of Mr. May at Haverhill, Mass.; on September 17, the Brighton-Street ittier, and A. Bronson Alcott and his wife, a sister of Samuel J. May (Woman's Journal, Oct. 26, 1878, p. 340). Mr. Whittier Recollections, p. 153). The Utica news you will find in S. J. May. the Journal of Commerce, though that paper evidently gi What is the probable prospect? W. L. Garrison to S. J. May, at Boston. Brooklyn, Dec. 5, 1835. I have just read point to anything better than Francis Jackson's reply to S. J. May's letter conveying the thanks of the Massachusetts A. S. oquent and powerful passages in it. W. L. Garrison to S. J. May, at Boston. Brooklyn, December 26, 1835. Ms. As tohis forenoon bro. May and myself, by express invitation, S. J. May. visited Miss Martineau at Mr. Gannett's house. The Reed by his introducer. His aspect put to flight in an Rev. S. J. May. instant what prejudices his slanderers had raised in
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
thout relying too much upon names. We can select them from all parts of the Commonwealth. The Managers should be the truest of the true. I should be glad to see our brother Wright Rev. H. C. Wright. one of the number. W. L. Garrison to Samuel J. May, at Boston. Brooklyn, January 17, 1836. Accompanying this I send a letter, which, if you think proper, you may read to the meeting on Wednesday next, and then Jan. 20, 1836. hand it over to friend Knapp for publication in the Liberator in self-exculpation than in order to defeat the Southern and pro-Southern design on a common right. Mr. Garrison, summoned by the Board of Managers for the occasion, left his wife and infant on Wednesday, the 2d of March, and, in company with S. J. May, proceeded on that day as far as Providence. W. L. Garrison to his Wife, at Brooklyn. Boston, March 5, 1836. Ms. . . . At 8 o'clock, next morning, we left for Boston in the stage-coach, (on runners), the rail-cars being obstructed b
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
and that of the most enthusiastic kind. What was peculiarly pleasing was to find men of various sects joining in one common panegyric. Among the speakers were Rev. Mr. Norris, Methodist; Isaac Samuel Norris. R. B. Hall. Alanson St. Clair. S. J. May. Henry B. Stanton. George W. Benson. Winslow, Friend; Rev. Mr. Hall, Congregationalist; Rev. Mr. St. Clair, Unitarian, etc., etc. Amasa Walker said that the success of the Liberator was identified with that of the cause. Even now the enemy l Agent. He is expected in Boston on Saturday [June 17], to commence his labors in good earnest (Ms.—Lib. 7.95; Right and Wrong in Boston, 1837, p. 25). Mr. Phelps's orthodoxy was regarded as an especial qualification, since the Unitarianism of Mr. May, lately the Corresponding Secretary of the Mass. A. S. Society, and of other leading Boston abolitionists (e. g., Mr. Sewall, Mr. Loring, Mr. Jackson, etc.), had been an unconcealed pretext for the hostility of the Orthodox hierarchy. reviewed
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
rsonal severity. On April 24, Mr. Garrison writes from Boston to S. J. May: My annual report is at last out. Bro. Phelps wrote a protest agted to promote this holy cause. The committee, consisting of the Rev. S. J. May, of South Scituate, Henry C. Wright, of Newburyport, the Rev.eal. Brother Wright is going to Scituate to spend H. C. Wright. S. J. May. a week with Bro. May, with whom he is to attempt what we ask of ics. Finally, Mr. Garrison himself, replying, September 8, to S. J. May, tells of domestic sickness having prevented him from drawing up on of Sentiments, of which I was chairman. His colleagues were S. J. May, Maria W. Chapman, E. Quincy, William Bassett, Abby Kelley, Pelegy, Wendell Lib. 8.155. Phillips, William Ladd, A. St. Clair, and S. J. May declined voting either way, though almost ready to swallow it ente friend and brother, Edmund Quincy. W. L. Garrison to Samuel J. May. Boston, Sept. 24, 1838. I need not say how anxious I feel,
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
w paper, and to spar the annual report, and we will show them how it is done. On January 4, 1839, Mr. Garrison wrote to Mr. May, urging him to be present at the meeting, and apprising him of the deplorable and alarming conspiracy: The game, t labors in Rhode Island, on the eve of embarking for New York, whither the scene of conflict next shifted. On May 1, Samuel J. May wrote (with unabated affection) from South Scituate as follows: I was very sorry to leave Boston, week before lnd that it was not essential to membership to believe or disbelieve in this duty. The Convention agreed to a motion of S. J. May's, that no reasonable effort should be spared to heal the breach in the ranks, but followed Mr. Garrison's lead in oppofe of Lundy, p. 277). was conspicuous. From New Hampshire came Stephen S. Foster. The business committee consisted of S. J. May, E. Quincy, H. C. Wright, Lib. 9.164. W. L. Garrison, Lucretia Mott, Maria W. Chapman, Lydia Maria Child, Thankful Sou
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 6: the schism.—1840. (search)
d to be there! . . . The northeasterly storm which had lasted for several days previous, cleared up finely just as we left Providence, and a glorious sunset and a bright moonlight evening followed. All was tranquil, all happy. In the course of the evening, spirited addresses were made by Wm. M. Chace, Dr. Manford, Alias John Colman. His titulary name, like his anti-slavery profession, was put on (Lib. 10: 111, 131, and Ms. July 16, 1841, Oliver Johnson to W. L. G.) C. M. Burleigh, Samuel J. May, N. P. Rogers, and J. A. Collins, which were frequently responded to in an enthusiastic manner. The muster was not confined to the friends of the old organization. The New Organizationists, too, and the Lib. 10.90, 122. New York Executive Committee did what they could to pack They were very sore over their failure to effect a larger rally. The Rev. Samuel May, of Leicester, Mass., one of the delegates to the Convention, wrote to Francis Jackson on May 18, 1840 (Ms.): I found a
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
by a foreigner, That the question had been present in Mr. Garrison's mind before leaving London, is shown by a letter of W. H. Ashurst's to him, dated July 26, 1840 (Ms.): What were the points of information you wanted, when you asked me what law book would give you information as to the oppressive laws by which the poor are bound down and made serfs in England? I supposed you needed it for use as an editor. I could not enjoy the beautiful landscapes of England, writes Mr. Garrison to S. J. May, on Sept. 6, 1840 (Ms.), because of the suffering and want staring me in the face on the one hand, and the opulence and splendor dazzling my vision on the other. I was much pleased, continues the same letter, with Scotland —better pleased than with England. Her scenery, indeed, is not so beautiful, but it is far more grand and sublime; and she has enough of beauty to atone for what is wild and rude in her formation. I like her people better than I do the people of England: they are more
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 8: the Chardon-Street Convention.—1840. (search)
can smile at Satan's rage, and face a frowning world, for my trust is in the Lord, and Christ is my Redeemer. Dear George, come on to the Convention, and do not say, I cannot. Bring bro. Wright with you, and H. C. Wright. Rev. W. Coe. friend Coe, and as many of the Brooklyn friends as possible. These are solemn, glorious, stirring times to live in! Let us do with our might what our hands find to do. So, come along! . . . Bro. May speaks of his visit to Brooklyn with a great deal Rev. S. J. May. of pleasure. He will be at the Sabbath Convention. . . . No adequate report of the Convention was ever made. It met at the Chardon-Street Chapel on November 17, Lib. 10.190. 1840, and sat for three days, without arriving at any conclusion or adopting any resolutions. The roll of members embraced, besides the persons already enumerated, Francis Jackson, Henry G. Chapman, Samuel Philbrick, William Adams, Andrew Robeson, James Russell Lowell, George Ripley, C. P. Cranch, and not a
to Chardon St. Convention, 424.— Letters to S. J. May, 1.471, G., 2.38, Henry Benson, 2.41; from G. May, 121, C. C. Burleigh, 124.— Letters to S. J. May, 1.262, 262, 286, G. W. Benson, 1.281, 452, bts as to Collins's mission, 416.—Letters to S. J. May, 1.476, Henry Benson, 2.39, G., 2.52, E. M. ution, 237, Sabbath, 267, Lundy, 272, 2.323; S. J. May, 1.273, farewell on leaving for England, 345289; B. Lundy, 1.196; Mass. A. S. S., 2.85; S. J. May, 1.221, 314, 428, 431, 450,: 56, 65, 85, 13,193; Z. Macaulay, 1.377; C. Marriott, 2.205; S. J. May, 1.304, 466, 2.223, 293; 0. S. Murray, 1.450.348.—Letter to F. Jackson, 2.348. May, Samuel Joseph, Rev. [b. Boston, Mass., Sept. 12, 1797; d.rson, C. Follen, E. S. Gannett, S. May, Jr., S. J. May, J. G. Palfrey, J. Pierpont, R. F. Wallcut, pudiates Non-Resistance Soc., 242.—Letter to S. J. May, 1.462, 465. Warsaw Convention, foundatio2.134, 160, 161, E. Quincy, 2.254, 426, 427, S. J. May, 2.294.—Portrait in Autobiog'y. Wright, T[2 m