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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. G. McAdoo or search for W. G. McAdoo in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
last the Secretary left Richmond at 8 A. M., joined General Fitzhugh Lee at Charlottesville, and started on a tour from which we returned on the 19th of March. Travelling by the Chesapeake and Ohio, Virginia Midland, Norfolk and Western, and East Tennessee and Georgia railways, through the charming regions of Piedmont Virginia, the Valley of Virginia, Southwest Virginia, and East Tennessee, we reached Knoxville at 3:30 A. M., but even at that hour found Colonel Moses White and Professor W. G. McAdoo at the depot to give us a cordial welcome and comfortable quarters. The day was most pleasantly spent receiving calls from prominent citizens, driving around the city, inspecting the beautiful model farm of Mr. Dickerson, viewing the ground over which Longstreet's brave men made their fruitless charge, and visiting other points of interest in this busy, thriving city. At night an audience, variously estimated at from six to eight hundred of Knoxville's best people, assembled to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
last the Secretary left Richmond at 8 A. M., joined General Fitzhugh Lee at Charlottesville, and started on a tour from which we returned on the 19th of March. Travelling by the Chesapeake and Ohio, Virginia Midland, Norfolk and Western, and East Tennessee and Georgia railways, through the charming regions of Piedmont Virginia, the Valley of Virginia, Southwest Virginia, and East Tennessee, we reached Knoxville at 3:30 A. M., but even at that hour found Colonel Moses White and Professor W. G. McAdoo at the depot to give us a cordial welcome and comfortable quarters. The day was most pleasantly spent receiving calls from prominent citizens, driving around the city, inspecting the beautiful model farm of Mr. Dickerson, viewing the ground over which Longstreet's brave men made their fruitless charge, and visiting other points of interest in this busy, thriving city. At night an audience, variously estimated at from six to eight hundred of Knoxville's best people, assembled to