hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for William McAllister or search for William McAllister in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

h several heavy guns, bearing on the land approaches. The morning of the thirteenth, I accompanied General Sherman to Doctor Cheves's Rice-Mill, where we had McAllister full in view. At the rice-mill a section of De Grase's battery was firing occasionally at the Fort opposite, three miles and a half distant, as a diversion, haved to be a tug, sent by General Foster and Admiral Dahlgren, for the purpose of communicating with us. Just as the signal officer of the stealer inquired if McAllister was ours, we noticed a brisker fire at the Fort, and our flags and men passing the abattis, through tile ditch and over the parapet, and then we saw the men firame anxious to crown our success by the capture of Savannah. In order to accomplish this, every exertion was made; heavy guns were brought from Hilton Head and McAllister, and placed in position; the lines were worked up closer to the enemy along the dikes; good batteries constructed for small guns, and every part of the front of
h several heavy guns, bearing on the land approaches. The morning of the thirteenth, I accompanied General Sherman to Doctor Cheves's Rice-Mill, where we had McAllister full in view. At the rice-mill a section of De Grase's battery was firing occasionally at the Fort opposite, three miles and a half distant, as a diversion, haved to be a tug, sent by General Foster and Admiral Dahlgren, for the purpose of communicating with us. Just as the signal officer of the stealer inquired if McAllister was ours, we noticed a brisker fire at the Fort, and our flags and men passing the abattis, through tile ditch and over the parapet, and then we saw the men firame anxious to crown our success by the capture of Savannah. In order to accomplish this, every exertion was made; heavy guns were brought from Hilton Head and McAllister, and placed in position; the lines were worked up closer to the enemy along the dikes; good batteries constructed for small guns, and every part of the front of
cluding killed, two hundred and fifty men and officers; twenty-four pieces of ordnance, with their equipments; forty tons of ammunition; a month's supply of food for the garrison; the small-arms of the command; all the animals and equipments of a light battery; the horses of the officers, and a large amount of private stores, placed in the Fort for safety. To my entire staff especial praise is due, for their faithful and efficient conduct during the entire campaign. After the fall of McAllister, the division was directed to destroy the Gulf Railroad for a distance of twenty miles west of the Ogeechee, which it proceeded to do in the most thorough manner, completing the work December twenty-first. I would respectfully call attention to accompanying reports of brigade commanders. Also to drawing of Fort McAllister, and a map of the country passed over. The supply-train of this division on leaving Atlanta consisted of eighty-three six-mule wagons. I transferred to other comm
the enemy, I ordered him to move to the rear and fill his limbers again. I then went to look after my other section, on the left. After getting nearly there, I found that it had already been ordered to the rear. The artillery duel was a sharp one, having been fought principally with canister and short-range shell. The following is a list of the casualties sustained in my company: Thomas Jordan, supposed to be mortally wounded in head; Samuel S. Carpenter, gunner, severely in arm; William McAllister, slightly in side; John Mackay, slightly in thigh; George Byrd, slightly in cheek. I lost two horses, killed; three were disabled, and had to be left on the field. Strength on the eighth, rank and file, seventy; strength on the ninth, rank and file, fifty-five-eleven not engaged. Very respectfully submitted. Joseph Carpenter, Commanding Battery. Copy of Fremont's order of march. Mountain Department, headquarters army in the field, Harrisonburgh, June 8, 1862. order of