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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
charge of deliberately and wilfully destroying the lives of the prisoners held by her. Means for securing cleanliness. The next charge is, that the Libby and Belle Isle prisoners were habitually kept in a filthy condition, and that the officers and men confined there were prevented from keeping themselves sufficiently clean to avoid vermin and similar discomforts. The evidence clearly contradicts this charge. It is proved by the depositions of Major Turner, Lieutenant Bossieux, Rev. Dr. McCabe, and others, that the prisons were kept constantly and systematically policed and cleansed; that in the Libby there was an ample supply of water conducted to each floor by the city pipes, and that the prisoners were not only not restricted in its use, but urged to keep themselves clean. At Belle Isle, for a brief season (about three weeks), in consequence of a sudden increase in the number of prisoners, the police was interrupted, but it was soon restored, and ample means for washing b
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The career of General A. P. Hill. (search)
esponsible for the remarkable fact that no history of A. P. Hill has yet been given to the public. Any adequate life of the Confederate commander, or of his foremost lieutenant, so necessarily involves constant presentation of the deeds wrought by one less lofty in character, steadfast in purpose, and terrible in battle than either, that we may not be surprised if the general public has thus far been satisfied with the frequent recurrence of his name and deeds in the pages of Dabney, Cooke, McCabe, Randolph, and others. But it is not just to one who, in any other association, would have been facile princess; of whom it may truthfully be said that he was a determining factor in every important battle of the campaigns in the East, that his achievements should serve the one purpose of magnifying others, or that he should be seen only in the reflected light of stars of larger magnitude. Measured by the standards which men apply to the claimants of mastership in war, Hill was not a gr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The defence of Fort Gregg. (search)
The defence of Fort Gregg. Since publishing in our last number General Lane's account of the defence of Fort Gregg, we have received a letter from an officer of the Washington artillery, complaining that injustice was done that gallant command in Captain McCabe's note (page 301, December Number), by omitting all mention of the part borne by them. In General Lane's account the name of Lieutenant McElroy of the Washington artillery is mentioned. But in order that we may give all a fair hearing, we take pleasure in republishing, as requested, the following account from A Soldier's Story of the Late War, by Napier Bartlett. We may add the remark that in the peculiar circumstances which surrounded the heroic band from different commands who collected in Fort Gregg, it is perfectly natural that there should be honest differences of opinion as to the numbers, &c., of the several commands. But they were all Confederate soldiers, and they bore themselves worthily in the hour of trial.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
ory of the tenth Massachusetts Battery of light Artillery, 1862-1865. By John D. Billings. Boston: Hall & Whiting, Publishers. 1881. This is a well gotten up book of four hundred pages, which tells in interesting style the story of a gallant battery which served with the Army of the Potomac. With few exceptions it seems to be written in a fair spirit, and to strive to do justice to the Confederates--albeit a little more careful study of our official reports and a little less reliance on McCabe's Lee as Confederate authority, would have helped the historic value of the book. On the whole, we commend it as greatly superior to many similar publications. We are indebted to the courteous author for our copy. The Publishers — Charles Scribner's Sons, New York — have sent us the following additional volumes of their Campaigns of the civil war: III. The Peninsula, by General Alexander S. Webb; IV. The Army under Pope, by John C. Ropes, Esq.; V. The Antietam and Fredericks
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of the crater, July 30, 1864. (search)
ndoned by those having it in charge, but was afterwards effectively served; Captain McCabe, in his account of the defence of Petersburg, says by Hampton Gibbs and Lieve cause to complain of the slight praise bestowed upon Wright's battery by Captain McCabe in his account of the defence of Petersburg, (published in the Southern Historical Society papers). Captain McCabe was Adjutant of Pegram's battalion of artillery, and probably not upon the scene until the arrival of Pegram's artillery, whice, but it apparently produced no effect. I have no criticisms to make upon Captain McCabe's account of what was done by others, but I do claim for the men under my cminent in the defence of Petersburg on that day. Without intimating that Captain McCabe's sources of information were unreliable, I will state here that an army co as we marched down the line and through the covered way to Petersburg. Captain McCabe, in the same account, has failed to do full justice to the men of Elliott's
tanton, Thompson, Wood, and Speaker Stovall. Nays.--Messrs. Boyd, Bradford, Hildreth, Nash, Richardson, and Stokes. Absent and not voting--Messrs. Bumpass, Mickley, Newman, Stokely, and Trimble. The following is the vote in the House: Yeas.--Messrs. Baker of Perry, Baker of Weakley, Bayless, Bicknell, Bledsoe, Cheatham, Cowden, Davidson, Davis, Dudley, Ewing, Farley, Farrelly, Ford, Frazie, Gantt, Guy, Havron, Hart, Ingram, Jones, Kenner, Kennedy, Lea, Lockhart, Martin, Mayfield, McCabe, Morphies, Nail, Hickett, Porter, Richardson, Roberts, Shield, Smith, Sewel, Trevitt, Vaughn, Whitmore, Woods, and Speaker Whitthorne. Nays.--Messrs. Armstrong, Brazelton, Butler, Caldwell, Gorman, Greene, Morris, Norman, Russell, Senter, Strewsbury, White of Davidson, Williams of Knox, Wisener, and Woodard. Absent and not voting--Messrs. Barksdale, Beaty, Bennett, Britton, Critz, Doak, East, Gillespie, Harris, Hebb, Johnson, Kincaid of Anderson, Kincaid of. Claiborne, Trewhitt, White
L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience, Final Chapter: the faithful but less conspicuous laborers. (search)
y other nurses of great merit appointed by the Western Sanitary Commission volunteer visitors in the St. Louis hospitals Ladies who ministered to the soldiers in Quincy, and in Springfield, Illinois Miss Georgiana Willets, Misses Molineux and McCabe Ladies of Cincinnati who served in the hospitals Mrs. C. J. Wright, Mrs. Starbuck, Mrs. Gibson, Mrs. Woods and Mrs. Caldwell Miss E. L. Porter of Niagara Falls Boston Ladies Mrs. And Miss Anna Lowell, Mrs. O. W. Holmes, Miss Stevenson, Mrs. Iowa, is deserving of all honor. Miss Georgiana Willets, of Jersey City, N. J., a faithful and earnest helper at the front from 1864 to the end of the war, deserves especial mention, as do also Miss Molineux, sister of General Molineux and Miss McCabe, of Brooklyn, N. Y., who were, throughout the war, active in aiding the soldiers by all the means in their power. Miss Sophronia Bucklin, of Auburn, N. Y., an untiring and patient worker among the soldiers of the Army of the Potomac, also des
L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience, Index of names of women whose services are recorded in this book. (search)
. Washington, 409. King, Mrs. Wyllys, 409. Kirchner, Mrs. Dr., 89. Kirkland, Mrs. Caroline M., 62. Knight, Miss Sophia, 412. Lane, Miss Adeline A., 407. Latham, Mrs. P. C., 409. Lanthrop, Mrs. L. E., 408. Leach, Mrs. Lydia, 408. Ledergerber, Miss Charlotte, 408. Lee, Mrs. Mary W., 47, 157. Livermore, Mrs. Mary A., 48, 53, 59, 178, 359. Long, Miss, 411. Loring, Miss Ira E. 411. Lovell, Miss S. R., 406. Lowell, Miss Anna, 410, 411. Lowell, Mrs., 410. Ludlow, Mrs. Mary, 408. McCabe, Miss, 409. McClintock, Miss Clara, 408. McClintock, Miss Marian, 408. McCracken, Miss Sarah F., 408. McEwen, Mrs. Hetty M., 73-75, 76. McFadden, Miss Rachel W., 53. McNair, Miss Carrie C., 408. Maertz, Miss Louisa, 48, 390-394. Marshall, Miss Fanny, 408. May, Miss Abby W., 53. Melvin, Mrs. S. H., 409. Mendenhall, Mrs. Elizabeth S., 53. Menefee, Mrs., 410. Merritt, Mrs., 302. Mills, Mrs., 89. Molineaux, Miss, 409. Moore, Mrs., (of Knoxville, Tenn.), 76, 77. Morris, Mrs. E.
th and not the South that is open to the charge of deliberately and wilfully destroying the lives of the prisoners held by her. The next charge is, that the Libby and Belle Isle prisoners were habitually kept in a filthy condition, and that the officers and men confined there were prevented from keeping themselves sufficiently clean to avoid vermin and similar discomforts. The evidence clearly contradicts this charge. It is proved by the depositions of Maj. Turner, Lieut. Bossieux, Rev. Dr. McCabe, and others, that the prisons were kept constantly and systematically policed and cleansed; that in the Libby there was an ample supply of water conducted to each floor by the city pipes, and that the prisoners were not only not restricted in its use, but urged to keep themselves clean. At Belle Isle, for a brief season (about three weeks), in consequence of a sudden increase in the number of prisoners, the police was interrupted, but it was soon restored, and ample means for washing,
the new line, using bayonets, knives and even tin cans as dirt removers. On the 18th, Longstreet's advanced division got in place, and all assaults were repulsed with loss. These repeated assaults cost Grant's army 8,150 men. Grant learned, as McCabe aptly quotes, that Petersburg could not be taken by the collar. With the coming of the rest of Lee's army, other North Carolina troops went into the trenches, as follows: Cooke's brigade, MacRae's brigade, Lane's brigade, Scales' brigade, and r to draw Lee's forces from the trenches, and thus insure the success of the attack that was to follow the destruction and confusion wrought by the explosion of the mine. All the siege and field artillery was to support the attack. Then, says McCabe, Ledlie was to push through the breach straight for Cemetery hill. Willcox was to follow, and after passing the breach, deploy on the left and seize the Jerusalem plank road. Potter was to pass to the right and protect his flank, while Ferrero'
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