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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 6 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. Gordon McCabe or search for W. Gordon McCabe in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Gen. C. R. Wheat, commander of the Louisiana Tiger Battalion (search)
nd utterly defeated. In compliance with his own wish, expressed in the words, Bury me on the field, boys, his remains were at first interred near the spot where he fell; but it was afterwards found impossible properly to protect the grave, and therefore the body was removed, the following winter, to Hollywood cemetery, being escorted by a large military and civic procession from the Monumental church, where the burial service was performed by the Rev. Dr. Woodbridge, and at the grave by Dr. McCabe. The caisson bier, the riderless horse, the solemn dirge, the soldiers' thrice-vollied farewell—were these the last of earth to our hero? The precious remains of his manly beauty were, indeed, laid in the grave; but he, the pure patriot, the selfsacrificing soldier, the martyred hero, the sincere Christian, had passed into the heavens—promoted, at last! His friends think of him as having had an especial honor put upon him. He is gone up from a remote province to the Capital of the Empir
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Monument to General Robert E. Lee. (search)
In fit phrase General Early introduced Captain W. Gordon Mc-Cabe, of Petersburg. The poem. The committee had been exceedingly fortunate in securing Captain W. Gordon McCabe, of Petersburg, to recite the poem prepared for the occasion by the gifted and lamented James Barron Hope, lately deceased. A gallant soldier, an accomplished scholar, a poet of no mean abilities himself, and the intimate personal friend of Hope, Captain McCabe was recognized by all as the man for the occasion. He introduced the reading of the poem by the following eloquent tribute to his lamented friend: Nearly thirty years ago, when Virginia, in this beautiful capital of ouuntrymen, Upon this sacred sod, Let us feel: it was “our father Who above us held the rod, And from hills to sea, Like Robert Lee, Bow reverently to God. Captain McCabe's recitation of the poem was frequently interrupted with applause. The Oration of Colonel Charles Marshall. General Early then introduced Colonel Marsha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
Leidy, Watkins Lindsay, Lieutenant L. L. Lacy, J. W. Lockwood, Dr. W. Augustus Lee, C. T. Loehr, W. P. Lawton, General Fitzhugh Lee, S. H. Liggon, H. S. Luffsey, General L. L. Lomax, William J. Leake, George W. Libby, A. M. Lawrence. Captain W. Gordon McCabe, George C. Mountcastle, John Murphy, E. W. Marable, H. G. Millet, John A. Meanly, P. H. Mayo, D. S. McCarthy, T. F. Minor, J. D. Moncure, John F. Mayer, George W. May, Henry Meyer, J. B. McKinney, E. C. Minor, J. D. McIntire, J. R. Mounther Battery.—Major Thomas A. Brander, Lieutenant John Tyler, Corporal D. S. Cates, privates F. Kell, James T. Ferriter, and C. T. Outland. Fredericksburg Battery.—Privates E. T. Chesley, H. Cabell Tabb, and John Ferneyhough. Staff.—Captain W. Gordon McCabe. Sons of Veterans. R. S. Chew Camp Sons of Veterans, 40 strong, from Fredericksburg, preceded by Bowery's band, numbering 20 pieces, who were guests of Sons of Veterans of Richmond. Sons of Veterans, Captain Louis Rawlings, with<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
ieties and citizens will follow in the rear. The line of march will embrace a number of the principal streets before the start is made for Blandford cemetery. At the cemetery. At the cemetery his Excellency Governor P. W. McKinney will preside over the ceremonies, which will be opened with prayer by Rev. J. W. Rosebro, acting chaplain of A. P. Hill Camp. After prayer a beautiful ode will be sung by the chorus of the Petersburg Musical Association. The orator of the day, Colonel W. Gordon McCabe, will be introduced by Governor McKinney. To Miss Lucy Lee Hill, daughter of General A. P. Hill, has been accorded the honor of drawing the veil from the monument, which act will be greeted with a salvo of artillery and volleys of musketry. After this the decoration of the graves. The chief marshal of the day is Col. E. M. Henry, commander of the Grand Camp of Confederate Veterans of the State. He will be accompanied by the members of his staff, and assisted by Messrs. R. M.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The unveiling. [Richmond Dispatch, June 10, 1890.] (search)
federate States. On the stand were also seated the ladies of the Memorial Association, Miss Lucy Lee Hill, ministers of the gospel, and Mayor Collier. Prayer was offered by Rev. C. R. Haines, D. D., after which Mayor Collier introduced Captain W. Gordon McCabe as the orator of the day, who spoke as follows: Captain McCabe's address. My Fellow-Citizens: If from the happier land the dead look down and are touched in any measure by concerns of earth, surely there is deeper joy in Heaven Captain McCabe's address. My Fellow-Citizens: If from the happier land the dead look down and are touched in any measure by concerns of earth, surely there is deeper joy in Heaven this day as those dear comrades who have fallen on sleep gaze upon this eager concourse of old companions in arms, of loyal kinsmen, and of steadfast friends who have gathered here at the bidding of the noble women, who in the brave old days cheered these men as they trod the thorny path of duty and who to-day unveil to the broad light of Heaven this beautiful monument, reared by pious hands to perpetuate to all coming time the constancy and valor of those who lived heroic life and died heroic d
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
der of, 373. Lee's Lieutenants, List of the Surviving Generals of the C. S. Army, 419. Leventhorpe, General, Collett, death of, 61. Lewis, General, 75. Lincoln, Abraham, his Character contrasted with that of Jeff. Davis, 125, 131; His Course created the Confederacy, 219; Effect of his call for Troops from the South, 227. Lopez's Cuban Expedition, 49. Loring, General W. W., Order of, 167. Louisiana, Acquisition of, 91, 433. Louisiana Tiger Battalion, 47, 54. McCabe, Captain, W. Gordon, his Tribute to James Barron Hope, 208; Address of, at Petersburg, Va., June 9, 1890, 395. McClellan's Advance on Richmond, 323. McClure, A. K., 354. McCrady, Major, John, 68, 74. McKinney, Governor P. W., Remarks of, 299. McLaws, General, Lafayette, 68, 73, 74, 75. Manassas, First Battle of 54. Marshall, Col. Charles, his Oration at the laying of the Corner-stone of the Lee Monument, 215. Maryland Troops at the Dedication of the Lee Monument, 270; Veterans, 28