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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 78 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 66 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 66 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 49 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 37 5 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 29 3 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 27 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 8 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 22 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for McCall or search for McCall in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jackson's Valley campaign of 1862. (search)
ent on Richmond. Banks, hearing of Ewell's arrival in the Valley, fears an attack from him and Jackson combined, and retires from Harrisonburg to New Market. Jackson's inaction for some weeks, and now his movement to West Virginia, reassures the Federal Administration, and Shields, with more than half of Banks' force, is detached at New Market, and ordered to Fredericksburg to swell McDowell's corps to over 40,000 men. McDowell says his corps at this time consisted of the divisions of McCall, King and Ord. * * * There were about 30,000 men altogether. Then General Shields came with about 11,000 men, making my force about 41,000 men. He had also 100 pieces of artillery. See McDowell's testimony before the Committee on Conduct of the War, part I, 1863, page 267. Banks is left with only some 7,000 or 8,000, and falls back to Strasburg, which he fortifies. Shields left New Market May 12th. He assumes a defensive attitude, to hold the lower Valley, and to cover the Baltimore an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 11.82 (search)
on to this point, sending notice to General Walker of the completion of the bridge. Arriving at dusk, I soon met Major Harrison from below. He reported the parish of Tensas and Lower Madison clear of the enemy. One of his companies, under Captain McCall, attacked on the morning of the 4th a negro camp on Lake Saint Joseph. He found them some ninety strong; killed the captain (white), twelve negroes and captured the remainder. Some sixty women and children in the camp were also secured. CaCaptain McCall had sixty men. Major Harrison brought off some few arms, medicines, etc., from Perkins, Surget's Basin and Carthage, all of which points he found abandoned by the enemy. At several places much property had been burned. To finish the operations of Harrison's cavalry: On the morning of the 6th,whilst awaiting Walker's arrival, the en emy's cavalry was reported to me to be approaching from Milliken's Bend. Major Harrison with a hundred men advanced to meet them. Three miles distant