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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 172 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 109 3 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 82 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 61 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 51 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 27 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 13 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 25, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox. You can also browse the collection for George A. McCall or search for George A. McCall in all documents.

Your search returned 31 results in 4 document sections:

General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 1: the Ante-bellum life of the author. (search)
seen, but when the sun rose to light the field it was found vacant. A careful reconnoissance revealed that the enemy was in retreat, and the dragoons reported them in march towards our comrades at Fort Brown. General Taylor remained on the field a few hours to have the killed and wounded of both sides cared for, but sent the dragoons, light infantry, and Ringgold's battery in pursuit, the latter under Lieutenant Randolph Ridgely. The light infantry was of two battalions, under Captain George A. McCall and Captain C. F. Smith. The route of march was through a dense chaparral on both sides of the road, the infantry finding their way as best they could through the chaparral, the dragoons and Texas Rangers moving on the road, and far off from our flanks, wherever they could find ways of passage. The company to which I was attached was of Smith's battalion, on the right of the road. After a considerable march the battalion came to the body of a young Mexican woman. She had ceased
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 4: the Confederates hovering around Washington. (search)
ppi Regiments were sent to the same vicinity, and with the regiment already there and a battery constituted the Seventh Brigade, Brigadier-General N. G. Evans commanding. To cover a reconnoissance and an expedition to gather supplies made by General McCall's division to Dranesville, General McClellan ordered General C. P. Stone, commanding at Poolesville, Maryland, to make a demonstration in force against Leesburg, and, if practicable, to dislodge the Confederates at that place. Early in the m The infantry regiments were the Eleventh Virginia, Colonel Samuel Garland; Tenth Alabama, Colonel Forney; Sixth South Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Secrest; and First Kentucky, Colonel Thomas Taylor; the cavalry, Ransom's and Bradford's. General McCall, commanding the nearest Union division, happened just then to want those supplies, or, as seems more probable, had information through a spy of Stuart's expedition. He took measures to gather the supplies, or surprise and perhaps capture
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 10: fighting along the Chickahominy. (search)
net charges-Greek meets Greek capture of General McCall McClellan's masterly retreat. The day ith the divisions of Sykes and Morell. Two of McCall's brigades, J. F. Reynolds's and Seymour's, wi, the other divisions in supporting distance. McCall's advanced brigades had guards at the bridges were suffered but little; none very severely. McCall replenished ammunition and prepared to renew tristling artillery for the first defence, with McCall's division of infantry and a tremendous array s right and left going in, in the same spirit, McCall's fire and the forest tangle thinned our ranksintzelman said,-- In less than an hour General McCall's division gave way. General Hooker, beingat he threw Longstreet over on Kearny, but General McCall said that by a little stretch of the hypere battle till the near approach of night, when McCall, in his last desperate effort to reinforce and Virginia Regiment that caught and invited General McCall to quarter with the Confederates. Althoug[17 more...]
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 11: battle of Malvern Hill. (search)
rve artillery massed, supported by the divisions of Sykes and Morell on the left and Couch's on the right, from the Crew House to J. W. Binford's. The field had been carefully selected and as judiciously guarded by well-posted commands, holding the only way left which gave hope of successful passage to cover under the gunboats. During the night of the 30th of June and early morn of the 1st of July this position was reinforced by the retreating Federals,--first by the Second and Third Corps, McCall's division of the Fifth, and W. F. Smith's of the Sixth, and later by other troops. Among the trains moving for the river was one of ten siege guns under Colonel Tyler. These were dropped in Porter's rear and put in battery, giving them a sweep of the avenues of approach and extensive rake of the woodlands, and a great number of lighter batteries bristled upon the brow and down the slopes of the hill. On either flank the plateau was somewhat guarded by ravines and tangled marsh lands, whi