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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Camp fires of the boys in Gray. (search)
Camp fires of the boys in Gray. By Private Carlton McCarthy, of the Richmond Howitzers. [Note.--The substance of this paper was delivered in response to a toast at the banquet and reunion of the Richmond Howitzers, November 9th, 1875, and there has been a very general desire for its publication. It is a vivid picture of camp life, which will be readily recognized by the old soldier,. and contains matter well worthy of a place in these papers.] The soldier may forget the long, weary march, with its dust, heat and thirst, and he may forget the horrors and blood of the battle-field, or he may recall them sadly, as one thinks of the loved dead; but the cheerful, happy scenes of the camp fire he will never forget! How willingly he closes his eyes to the present to dream of those happy, careless days and nights. Around the fire crystallize the memories of the soldier's life. It was his home — his place of rest, where he met with good companionship. Who kindled the fire? Nobody
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Detailed Minutiae of soldier life in the Army of Northern Virginia. (search)
Detailed Minutiae of soldier life in the Army of Northern Virginia. By Carlton McCarthy, Private of Second Company Richmond Howitzers, Cutshaw's Battalion. [Many of our boys who wore the gray will be glad to see these vivid pictures of what they experienced, and many others will rejoice to have these details of soldier life. And these minutiae are by no means beneath the notice of the grave historians who would know and tell the whole truth concerning our grand old army.] Paper no. 1.--the outfit modified. With the men who composed the Army of Northern Virginia will die the memory of those little things which made the Confederate soldier peculiarly what he was. The historian who essays to write the grand movements will hardly stop to tell how the hungry private fried his bacon, baked his biscuit and smoked his pipe; how he was changed from time to time by the necessities of the service, until the gentleman, the student, the merchant, the mechanic and the farmer were mer
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
R. Ransom; second, General H. Heth; third, General A. L. Long; fourth, General Wm. Terry; 5th, Captain D. B. McCorkle. Executive Committee--General Bradley T. Johnson, Major W. K. Martin, Colonel Thos. H. Carter, Major T. A. Brander, Private Carlton McCarthy. The annual orators of this division have been as follows: In ‘72, Wm. H. Payne and Colonel Jos. Mayo (in the absence of General John B. Gordon, orator elect). Colonel Charles S. Venable in 1873, Colonel Charles Marshall in 1874, and Maers. From General Dabney H. Maury, of Virginia--His recollections of the Elkhorn campaign. From W. Baird, Esq., of Essex county, Virginia--A Review of the first volume of the Count of Paris' History of the Civil War in America. From Carlton McCarthy, Esq., of Richmond--Two papers on Detailed Minutiae of Soldier Life. From Geo. T. Whitington, Alexandria--First morning report of troops at Manassas Junction, under command of Major Cornelius Boyle, May 6th, 1861. From Judge B. R. Well
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
n, and W. H. Parker. From General A. L. Long, Charlottesville, Virginia--Letter explaining previous paper on the Seacoast defences of South Carolina and Georgia. From Captain John K. Mitchell, Richmond, Virginia--Letter on the capture of New Orleans, enclosing Finding and opinion of a Naval Court of Inquiry exonerating him from all blame in that affair. From Captain A. F. Warley--A paper in reply to portions of Captain C. W. Read's Recollections of the Confederate Navy. From Carlton McCarthy, Richmond, Virginia--Paper No. 3 on Detailed Minutiae of soldier life. Our annual meeting comes off on Thursday evening, November the 2d, and we cordially invite the attendanee of our members from every section. The Virginia Division of the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia will have its Reunion on the night of the 2d of November, and the two meetings will attract a number of old Confederates, with whom it will be pleasant to mingle. Premiums for subscribers to m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Detailed Minutiae of soldier life in the Army of Northern Virginia. (search)
Detailed Minutiae of soldier life in the Army of Northern Virginia. By Carlton McCarthy, Private of Second Company Richmond Howitzers, Cutshaw's Battalion. Paper no. 2.--romantic ideas Dissipated. To offer a man promotion in the early part of the war was equivalent to an insult. The higher the social position, the greater the wealth, the more patriotic it would be to serve in the humble position of a private; and many men of education and ability in the various professions, refusing promotion, served under the command of men greatly their inferiors, mentally, morally, and as soldiers. It soon became apparent that the country wanted knowledge and ability, as well as muscle and endurance, and those who had capacity to serve in higher positions were promoted. Still it remained true, that inferior men commanded their superiors in every respect, save one--Rank; and leaving out the one difference of rank, the officers and men were about on a par. It took years to teach the ed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
ey wore the gray; and speeches, brimful of humor, pathos and eloquence, were made, in response to appropriate toasts. by General T. M. Logan, Major John W. Daniel, Judge F. R. Farrar, Captain John Lamb, Captain J. Hampden Chamberlayne, Corporal Carlton McCarthy, Rev. (Captain) A. W. Weddell, Captain Gordon McCabe, General Fitz. Lee, Colonel C. S. Venable, General B. T. Johnson, Dr. J. S. D. Cullen, Dr. R. T. Coleman, and others. The banquet was protracted into the wee sma‘ hours of the next meral R. Ransom; Second, General H. Heth; Third, General A. L. Long; Fourth, General Wm. Terry; Fifth, Captain D. B. McCorkle. Executive Committee--General B. T. Johnson, Major W. K. Martin, Colonel Thomas H. Carter, Major T. A. Brander, Corporal Carlton McCarthy. In the absence of the President, the Second Vice-President, General H. Heth, presided over the meeting and at the banquet. We have received from Major I. Scheibert, of the Royal Prussian Engineers, a very kind letter, in which
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Detailed Minutiae of soldier life in the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
Detailed Minutiae of soldier life in the army of Northern Virginia. By Carlton McCarthy, Private Second Company Richmond Howitzers, Cutshaw's Battalion. Paper no. 3--on the March. It is a common mistake of those who write on subjects familiar to themselves, to omit that particularity of description and detailed mention which,to one not so conversant with the matters discussed, is necessary to a clear appreciation of the meaning of the writer. This mistake is all the more fatal when the writer lives and writes in one age and his readers live in another. And so a soldier, writing for the information of the citizen, should forget his familiarity with the every-day scenes of soldier life and strive to record even those things which seem to him too common to mention. Who does not know all about the marching of soldiers? Those who have never marched with them and some who have. The varied experience of thousands would not tell the whole story of the march. Every man must be h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
ive value to the historian and to all interested in reaching the truth of our recent war between the States. Particularly welcome are the reports of General Maury of the operations of his department — headquarters at Mobile — and of General R. L. Page touching the defence of Fort Morgan. These papers are published for the first time, and fill an important gap in the story of the military life of the Confederacy. Captain Park's diary continues its minute and lifelike descriptions, and Mr. McCarthy's Soldier life is, as all his sketches, faithful and sparkling. The papers on the Fort Gregg defence help to throw light on affairs hitherto known but vaguely, and the memorial address on General Lee, confining itself for the most part to mere outline, yet attempts to set forth clearly the salient points of character and achievement exhibited by our great commander. This issue is, we repeat, of positive value as well as not a little of attractiveness in the various styles of its diffe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Detailed Minutiae of soldier life. (search)
Detailed Minutiae of soldier life. By Private Carlton McCarthy. Paper no. 4--cooking and eating. [Many of our readers will be glad to see another of those vivid sketches of soldier life from the pen of Private McCarthy, whose previous sketches were so widely read and commended.] Rations in the Army of Northern Virginia were alternately superabundant and altogether wanting. The quality, quantity and frequency of them depended upon the amount of stores in the hands of the commissariesPrivate McCarthy, whose previous sketches were so widely read and commended.] Rations in the Army of Northern Virginia were alternately superabundant and altogether wanting. The quality, quantity and frequency of them depended upon the amount of stores in the hands of the commissaries, the relative positions of the troops and the wagon trains, and the many accidents and mishaps of the campaign. During the latter years and months of the war, so uncertain was the issue as to time, quantity and composition, the men became in large measure independent of this seeming absolute necessity, and by some mysterious means, known only to purely patriotic soldiers, learned to fight without pay and find a subsistence in the field, the stream or the forest, and, on the bleak mountain side
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Detailed Minutiae of soldier life. (search)
Detailed Minutiae of soldier life. By Private Carlton McCarthy. Paper no. 5--improvised infantry — to Appomattox Courthouse. Sunday, April 2d, 1865, found Cutshaw's battalion of artillery occupying the earthworks at Fort Clifton, on the Appomattox, about two miles below Petersburg, Virginia. The command was composed of the Second company Richmond Howitzers, Captain Lorraine F. Jones, Garber's battery, Fry's battery and remnants of five other batteries (saved from the battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse, May 12, 1864), and had present for duty nearly five hundred men, with a total muster roll, including the men in prison, of one thousand and eighty. The place — the old Clifton house --was well fortified, and had the additional protection of the river along the entire front of perhaps a mile. The works extended from the Appomattox on the right to Swift creek on the left. There were some guns of heavy calibre, mounted and ready for action, and in addition to these some field-p
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