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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 10 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 7 1 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 6 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 2 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McCarthy, Justin 1830- (search)
McCarthy, Justin 1830- Author; born in Cork, Ireland, Nov. 22, 1830; visited the United States in 1868, and lectured for nearly three years. He is the author of Prohibitory legislation in the United States; A history of our own times; The story of Mr. Gladstone's life, etc.
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Index (search)
sination of, 5; and slavery, 143, 144; his enforced moderation, 145, 146; and emancipation, 147; 97, 140, 165, 171, 175, 241, 243, 259. Louisiana Purchase, 9, Io. Louisiana territory, slavery in, 9. Lovejoy, Elijah P., murder of, and its effect,128 if.; Emerson on, 231, 232; 117, 119, 238. Lundy, Benjamin, 42, 43, 46. Lunt, George, 124, 125, 127. Lunt Committee, 124 f. Luther, Martin, 35, 193. Lyman, Theodore, Mayor of Boston, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 121, 122, 123. McCarthy, Justin, 251. McDuffie, George, 127. MacAULAYulay, Zachary, 245. Martineau, Harriet, quoted, 195, 196, 248; her Martyr Age in America, 245; 105, 124. Massachusetts, southern attempt to enslave, 010-Io3. And see Boston. Matthew, Saint, Gospel of, quoted, 181-84. May, Samuel, Jr., 210, 211, 212. May, Samuel J., quoted, 73-75, 78-80, 81-86, 93-95, 196-98; converted to Abolition by G., 77 ff.; the angel of Anti-slavery, 78; and G., 80, 81; and the Lunt Committee, 124, 126, 127; 29,
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XV: journeys (search)
e part of Tyndall and Huxley due to their wives' influence, the only thing he said reflecting on women, nor was he cynical as I had heard. He seemed pleased at the reception of his books in the United States, but said he should never go there as he could not stand the loss of sleep in the voyage, which seemed to me a queer view. I have always felt incredulous as to his being a really great man and this interview did not remove it, but I liked him more than I expected . . . . Found Justin McCarthy and his pleasant wife and children at home, real Irish hospitality. . . . It was after 12 and they had just come down to breakfast. He and his son both work for morning papers and are up late. Then appeared at the door a great cheery handsome ruddy face with a mass of light gray hair standing out wildly all about it—this was Mrs. M. They are much with all the literary people, Rossettis, etc., and confirmed what I had heard that there is a strong reaction against Dickens—it is not the
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XVI: the crowning years (search)
diary says:— Received proof of A Typical American, by Madame Blanc; a London translation into English sent me for revision. I regard this as the greatest honor of my life, in a literary way—--to be treated so fully in the Revue des Deux Mondes by so able and so distinguished a woman and then to have it fully translated and published in London. Of course it gratified me, even if sometimes overstated and undeserved, gratified more than such pleasant personal tributes as those of Justin McCarthy, Tom Hughes, and others in their books of reminiscences. In February of the same year, he writes:— It was curious after my seven months absence [in Europe] when I wrote nothing for print, to come back and find the same continuous impulse of hard work in my study. April 3, 1902. Evening. E. E. Hale Festival— a fine meeting, thoroughly worked up and in a good cause; but I should not wish to have any injudicious friends try the same thing for me, even on a smaller scale, fo
Lowell, Maria White, Higginson's impressions of, 66. 67. Lowell Institute, Higginson lectures before on American Orators and Oratory, 389; on American Literature, 389; on English Literature, 390. Lyttleton, Lord, and Higginson, 324. McCarthy, Justin, Higginson visits, 336. McCarthy, Mrs., Justin, described, 336. McKinley, President, death of, 361. Mademoiselle and her Campaigns, 157, 407. Maine, Sir Henry, 328. Malbone, 289, 411, 423; beginning of, 275, 278; writing, 279-81McCarthy, Mrs., Justin, described, 336. McKinley, President, death of, 361. Mademoiselle and her Campaigns, 157, 407. Maine, Sir Henry, 328. Malbone, 289, 411, 423; beginning of, 275, 278; writing, 279-81, published, 281, 282. Manning, Cardinal, account of, 328, 329. Marguerite, Queen of Italy, Higginson's Sonnets of Petrarch sent to, 278. Marks, Lionel, poem on engagement of, 388, 389. Martineau, James, reception at, 329. Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the War of 1861-65, 386. 421. Massachusetts in Mourning, 146, 406. Masson, Prof, and Higginson, 328; dines with, 339, 340. May, Rev. Samuel, Jr., letter to, about anti-slavery excitement, 144, 145; and fugitive
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 2: the hour and the man.—1862. (search)
d for several years labored to excite public interest in the American antislavery movement, and to maintain the active alliance and cooperation established and fostered by him in his three visits to England. Thompson himself was the chairman, and his son-in-law, Frederick W. Chesson, the secretary, of this Committee. The enlarged Society included such men as John Stuart Mill, John Bright, Richard Cobden, Lord Houghton, Samuel Lucas, William E. Forster, Peter A. Taylor, Goldwin Smith, Justin McCarthy, Thomas Hughes, James Stansfeld, Jr., Prof. J. E. Cairnes, Herbert Spencer, Prof. Francis W. Newman, Rev. Baptist Noel, and Rev. Newman Hall, most of whom rendered direct and important service; but the organizer and tireless spirit of the movement was Mr. Chesson, to whose wide acquaintance with public men, unfailing tact and address, thorough information, and extraordinary industry and executive ability, a very large measure of credit for its success was due. The most cordial and sy
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 3: the Proclamation.—1863. (search)
the American Government, indicate what is the true state of public feeling on this side of the Atlantic. We have endured the misrepresentations of certain organs of our press too long, and we have now determined to endure them no longer. But always remember that, from the beginning, the best of our journals have remained true to the anti-slavery cause; that the Star, Daily News, The chief proprietor of the Morning Star was Samuel Lucas, a brother-inlaw of John Bright; its editors, Justin McCarthy and F. W. Chesson. The Daily News was edited by Thomas Walker, with the powerful aid of Harriet Martineau, who wrote scores of editorials on the American question. Westminster Review, Spectator, Nonconformist, British Standard, Dial, Birmingham Post, The Birmingham Post published an instructive series of letters on the American question from the pen of Mr. Samuel A. Goddard, an American gentleman long resident in that city, and a brother of Mrs. Mary May. They were subsequently col
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 8: to England and the Continent.—1867. (search)
more respectful, more sweet, more gentle than the manner in which he received my entreaty. Other friends whom he met were Peter A. Taylor, M. P. for Leicester, and his wife, ardent friends of the North in the war days, Thomas Hughes, and Justin McCarthy, then editing the Morning Star. Invitations to breakfast or dinner came to him from the son and grandson of his early friend, Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton, and from Lord Houghton, at whose house he met Anthony Trollope and Hepworth Dixon. Trolld wife, Professor Beesly, Henry Fawcett. Victor Schoelcher, As Colonial Minister under the French Republic of 1848, Schoelcher precipitated the abolition of slavery in the French colonies. W. Vernon Harcourt, Jacob Bright, E. S. Beesly. Justin McCarthy, Edward Miall, Frederic Harrison, Geo. J. Holyoake, William Black, and scores of others. Of Mr. Garrison's English anti-slavery friends there were the Ashursts, Stansfelds, Shaens, Taylors, Thompsons, and Chessons; and Richard D. Webb came
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 10: death of Mrs. Garrison.—final visit to England.—1876, 1877. (search)
wo exceptions they mustered their entire strength in favor of the measure, which was defeated by fifty-six majority. In spite of all the labor and excitement, Mr. Garrison gained perceptibly in health during his stay in London. Besides the friends already named, he met many others with whom he enjoyed a renewal of intercourse—among them, Henry Vincent, Madame Emilie Ashurst Venturi, Mrs. Priscilla Bright McLaren, Mrs. Fawcett, Miss Helen Taylor, Thomas Hughes, Professor James Bryce, Justin McCarthy, and George J. Holyoake. But he was glad at last to leave the great metropolis for the rural quiet and beauty of Somersetshire, whither he now went to visit Mr. Bright's daughter, Mrs. Helen Bright Clark, and her husband. With them he spent a delightful Sunday in William S. Clark. their home at Street, near Glastonbury and its ruined July 1. Abbey. Thence he drove with them by way of Wells July 2. (whose cathedral, with its Bishop's Garden and ancient moat and wall, he greatly adm
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Europe revisited--1877; aet. 58 (search)
rmy career, and his sister Fanny told me that he had in Parliament but one supporter of his views, a man named Biggar. He certainly had admirers elsewhere, for I remember having met a disciple of his, O'Connor by name, at a rout given by Mrs. Justin McCarthy. I asked this lady if her husband agreed with Mr. Parnell. She replied with warmth, Of course; we are all Home Rulers here. May 26. To Floral Hall concert, where heard Patti — and many others — a good concert. In the evening to Lord e 18. Synagogue. June 19. Lord Mayor's Mansion House. I am to speak there concerning Laura Bridgman. Henry James may come to take me to St. Bart.'s Hospital. June 25. Messiah. Miss Bryce. June 26. Dined with Capt. Ward. Theatre. Justin McCarthy. June 28. Meeting in Lambeth Library. June 29. Russell Gurney's garden party. Miss Marston's, Onslow Sq., 4 P. M. Antivivisection. Met Dudley Campbell. A day of rest, indeed. I wrote out my anti-vivisection argument for to-morrow,
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