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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 85 1 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 76 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 43 1 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John McCausland or search for John McCausland in all documents.

Your search returned 30 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
em. Between Winchester and Martinsburg, Early divided his forces, directing Johnson's Cavalry and Rodes' Brigade of Ramseur's Division, under Early himself, to the right, to cut the Baltimore and Ohio railroad at Kearneysville and unite with McCausland's Cavalry and Breckinridge's Corps at Martinsburg; Johnson and Mc- Causland to make a junction at Hainesville, behind Martinsburg, and thus cut off the retreat of Sigel, who was at that place. I struck Leetown just after daylight, and found itifications of Washington. His command consisted of the depleted divisions of Gordon, Rodes, Breckinridge and Ramseur, of about 8,500 muskets, the Cavalry Division of Major-General Robert Ransom, consisting of the brigades of Jackson, Johnson, McCausland and Imboden, about 2,000 badly armed, worse equipped, and undisciplined mounted men, and three battalions of artillery of about forty guns and 1,000 men; making a total effective force of about 11,500 men of all arms. Washington could only hav
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Refused to burn it. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, April 27, 1902.] (search)
brigades of Confederate cavalry, commanded by Generals McCausland and Bradley T. Johnson, the former the seniorch was done. He received a verbal order from General McCausland to distribute his men and to burn the town, amaterial would be found in the courthouse. General McCausland then rode off before a reply was given him. A short time after receiving the order from General McCausland, Colonel Peters sought an interview with General of the latter if he had correctly understood General McCausland, that he, Colonel Peters, with his men, was ehere he received a written communication from General McCausland inquiring whether he had understood the order It is proper to state that in this affair General McCausland was acting under orders received from Generaleat from the invasion of Pennsylvania referred to McCausland's command reached Moorefield, in Hardy county, anickets posted according to the orders of Brigadier-General McCausland, the commanding officer of the expeditio
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The campaign and battle of Lynchburg. (search)
boden with his small remnant of cavalry, and McCausland with his little brigades, occupying the hillriel C. Wharton and the cavalry under General John McCausland. It is impossible that the whole fores river there was only the skirmish line of McCausland's cavalry, and a few old men in the trenchest little brigade so admirably handled by General McCausland. If General Hunter did not know all tuence which stayed Hunter's advance. General John McCausland had been operating against the enemy aggregating some sixteen hundred men, under McCausland's leadership, ably seconded by Peters, at onand efficient member of its bar. What General McCausland did in this defence was not the only serbled condition, he mounted his horse, joined McCausland and rendered him valuable aid. To him was ast by General McCausland at New London and by McCausland and Imboden at the Quaker Meeting House, andoing injustice to the cavalry of Imboden and McCausland. General Early should have been more carefu[8 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Appendix. (search)
First Lieut., George W. Hobson. Second Lieut., R. G. Scott. Third Lieut., A. R. Woodroof. Privates. Butterworth, Moses. Doss, William. Hewitt, A. Bowling. Hewitt, A. R. Inge, William J. Kinnear, John H. Mason, John T. McDaniel, William L. McKinney, Barney. McCorkle, John J. Nowlin, James B. Rodes, Lafayette P. Steptoe, Jacob M. Christian, John, Hains, Christopher. Hewitt, A. I. Horner, James W. Kinckle, Frank T. Lewis, John, McCausland, Jas. F. Moore, Thomas W. McCorkle, William. Miller, Frank T. Petty, William J. Steptoe, W. T. Wills, Edwin D. Yancey, W. T. Second Regiment Virginia Cavalry. First mounted regiment organized in Virginia. Organized at Lynchburg, May 8, 1861, Colonel J. A. Early, mustering officer. First Colonel, R. C. W. Radford. Second Colonel, T. T. Munford. Third Colonel, Cary Breckinridge. First Lieutenant-Colonel, T. T. Munford. Second Lieutenant-Colonel, J. W