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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John M. McCausland or search for John M. McCausland in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
killed, our brigade was placed under General John M. McCausland. This company and the Churchville cavalry constituted McCausland's extreme rear-guard from Covington to Buchanan, while McCausland was McCausland was in front of Hunter and Crook, delaying their advance on Lynchburg, Va. Every foot of ground was contiver. Hunter and Crook were thus delayed by McCausland until General Early could be sent to save Lyrlough was given it, and Lynchburg presented McCausland a horse, sword and pair of silver spurs for ned by it. On our return from Washington, McCausland with his brigade, and General Bradley Johnsopproaches when it was burnt, and constituted McCausland's rear guard when he left there. McCauslandMcCausland captured Old Town, Md., and after making feints at Cumberland, came to Moorefield. Here the enemy er General A. G. Jenkins, next under General John M. McCausland, and last under General Beale, in th, Lieutenant and aid to Generals Jenkins and McCausland. Hannah, Andrew, killed at Williamsport,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
ectiveness by details, dismounts, fatigue, and hunger, that told most severely on our staggering horses, that had become a burden either to be abandoned or led dismounted; until at the last our entire brigade force was about equal to a depleted regiment at the latter end of the war. The Fourteenth Virginia Cavalry. Our regiment the 14th Virginia Cavalry, that was commanded at the time by myself as Captain of Company B, no field officer being present, had been transferred from General John M. McCausland's Brigade but a few weeks prior to the surrender, and assigned to General R. L. T. Beale's Brigade—W. H. F. Lee's Division. On the night of the 8th, in obedience to orders delivered by Major Joseph Van Holt Nash, Adjutant-General of Cavalry—Stuart's Corps-we advanced our regiment to the head of our brigade and division and march through the village of Appomattox Courthouse, where there had been a skirmish the night before. When we had passed the village some little distance, in