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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 11, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 6, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 3, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 2 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
John James Geer, Beyond the lines: A Yankee prisoner loose in Dixie 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John James Geer, Beyond the lines: A Yankee prisoner loose in Dixie. You can also browse the collection for McClain or search for McClain in all documents.

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kets, and the allowance of rations doled out to us was insufficient to sustain life. A lieutenant in the Confederate service, a poor, illiterate fellow, not possessed of education sufficient to call the muster-roll correctly, entered the prison and threatened to place Major Crockett--of whom we have spoken before — in irons, simply because he had referred, in the Lieutenant's presence, in no very favorable terms, to the character of our treatment. We had made application personally to Colonel McClain, then commandant of the post, and who, we learned, was a professed Christian. We were careful to appeal to his Christianity as a means of awakening an interest in our behalf. His reply was as follows: You invaders! you abolitionists! you that are stealing our property! you talk about Christianity! You should be the last men to utter a word on that subject. A lieutenant in our ranks, named Herbert, answered him by saying: If your so-called Southern Confederacy cannot