Browsing named entities in Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them.. You can also browse the collection for G. B. McClellan or search for G. B. McClellan in all documents.

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Chapter 30: The army reaches Alexandria; sent forward to Pope Pope's campaign McClellan's work at Alexandria the last man sent forward Stanton's ironical order McClellan commands a hundred men Halleck in despair McClellan's volunteer services. On the evening of Aug. 23 I sailed with my staff for Acquia creek,McClellan commands a hundred men Halleck in despair McClellan's volunteer services. On the evening of Aug. 23 I sailed with my staff for Acquia creek, where I arrived at daylight on the following morning, reporting to Gen. Halleck as follows: Acquia creek, Aug. 24, 1862. I have reached here, and respectfully report for orders. I also telegraphed as follows to Gen. Halleck: Morell's scouts report Rappahannock Station burned and abandoned by Pope without any notiMcClellan's volunteer services. On the evening of Aug. 23 I sailed with my staff for Acquia creek, where I arrived at daylight on the following morning, reporting to Gen. Halleck as follows: Acquia creek, Aug. 24, 1862. I have reached here, and respectfully report for orders. I also telegraphed as follows to Gen. Halleck: Morell's scouts report Rappahannock Station burned and abandoned by Pope without any notice to Morell or Sykes. This was telegraphed you some hours ago. Reynolds, Reno, and Stevens are supposed to be with Pope, as nothing can be heard of them to-day. Morell and Sykes are near Morrisville Post-office, watching the lower fords of Rappahannock, with no troops between there and Rappahannock Station, which is reported aba
despatch advance the battle of South Mountain Gen. Scott hails McClellan. In riding into Frederick I passed through Sumner's corps, whiBoston, May 19, 1884, Gen. F. A. Walker called the attention of Gen. McClellan to a statement made by the Comte de Paris in his History of theh I find among the papers relating to South Mountain, indicates Gen. McClellan's intention to embody its substance in his narrative when he shon of yours may move up on the right (north) of the main road. Gen. McClellan desires you to comply with this request, holding your whole corlf. Sumner's and Banks's corps have commenced arriving. Let Gen. McClellan be informed as soon as you commence your movement. George D. Rh you! Destroy the rebel army, if possible. A. Lincoln. To Maj.-Gen. McClellan. The following despatch was also received on the 16th: 862. (received, Frederick, Sept. 16th, 1862, 10.40 A. M.) To Maj.-Gen. McClellan: Bravo, my dear general! Twice more and it's done. Winfi
would have difficulty in overtaking it; so I let him go. At about midday I rode to the point where Reno was killed the day before, and found that Burnside's troops, the 9th corps, had not stirred from its bivouac, and still blocked the road for the regular division. I sent for Burnside for an explanation, but he could not be found. He subsequently gave as an excuse the fatigued and hungry condition of his men. headquarters, Army of Potomac. Sept. 15, 12.30 P. M. Gen. Burnside: Gen. McClellan desires you to let Gen. Porter's go on past you, if necessary. You will then push your own command on as rapidly as possible. The general also desires to know the reason for your delay in starting this morning. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Geo. D. Ruggles, Col. and A. D. C. After seeing the ground where Reno fell, and passing over Hooker's battle-ground of the previous day, I went rapidly to the front by the main road, being received by the troops, as I passed them
e, as I urged this morning, should be largely and immediately increased, under any hypothesis, whether to guard the river or advance on the enemy, or both. The following was received Oct. 25, 1862, from Washington, 4.50 P. M.: To Maj.-Gen. McClellan: I have just received your despatch about sore-tongued and fatigued horses. Will you pardon me for asking what the horses of your army have done since the battle of Antietam that fatigues anything? A. Lincoln. headquarters, Armythink, and their number increased to 1,000, with one battery of horse-artillery. I would respectfully desire to have Col. Williams in command. John Newton, Brig.-Gen. Commanding. Col. Colburn telegraphed from Washington, Oct. 25: To Gen. McClellan: I went this morning to see Gen. Halleck, and spoke to him about the bridges, etc., and also about rebuilding the road to Winchester and prolonging it to Strasburg; also about the forces to be left at Harper's Ferry, and what was to be done i
3, 81, 82, 89, 95, 96, 116, 156; retained by McClellan, 70; ingratitude, 71 ; hated by troops, 71, Clellan, arrests Col. Campbell, 295; to join McClellan, instructions, 347; force, 345, 347; order sreport on supplies, 636, 637. Memorandum (McClellan's) : object of the war, military success, 10 491, 500, 501, 505, 507-547, 568 ; condemns McClellan's plans, 475. Porter, Gen. A., 70, 100, 103, 605, 606. Scott, Gen. W., compliments McClellan, 61, 63, 64, 82 ; hinders McClellan, 84-86, 170, 171 ; quarrels with McClellan, 91 ; objects to organization, 113, 136; inability, 136 ; Hallec 595, 600, 606, 613. Senate congratulates McClellan, 82. Seneca Mills, Md., 106. Seven Pinrd, Sec., method of recruiting, 143 ; visits McClellan, 549. Seymour, Gen. T., at Gaines's Mill,nton, Sec., letter on Washington, 67 ; warns McClellan against Halleck, 137 ; duplicity and treache-480, 540, 541 ; prolonging the war, accuses McClellan of political aspirations, 151 ; abuses party[11 more...]
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