Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for G. B. McClellan or search for G. B. McClellan in all documents.

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Doc. 96.-occupation of Williamsburgh, Va. General McClellan's despatches. headquarters army of the Potles which preceded and attended the retreat of Gen. McClellan from the Chickahominy toward Harrison's Landing. When first General McClellan began to intimate by his despatches that he designed making this movement towarnd urged upon him that he should send orders to Gen. McClellan that if he were unable to maintain his positiont that the retreat to James River was carrying General McClellan away from any reinforcements that could possibany of the forces under my command to reenforce Gen. McClellan without rendering it certain that the enemy, evthe President and the Secretary of War. After General McClellan had taken up his position at Harrison's Landino this communication, I received a letter from General McClellan, very general in its terms, and proposing nothon between them, some military superior both of Gen. McClellan and myself should be called to Washington and p
Doc. 96.-occupation of Williamsburgh, Va. General McClellan's despatches. headquarters army of the Potomac, Williamsburgh, May 6, 1862. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War: I have the pleasure to announce the occupation of this place, as the result of the hard-fought action of yesterday. The effect of Hancock's brilliant engagement yesterday afternoon was to turn the left of the enemy's line of works. He was strongly reenforced, and the enemy abandoned the entire position during the night, leaving all his sick and wounded in our hands. The enemy's loss yesterday was very severe. We have three hundred uninjured prisoners and more than a thousand (rebel) prisoners wounded. Their loss in killed is heavy. The victory is complete. I have sent cavalry in pursuit, but the roads are in very bad condition. The conduct of our men has been excellent, with scarcely an exception. The enemy's works are very extensive and exceedingly strong, both in respect to their po
of battles which preceded and attended the retreat of Gen. McClellan from the Chickahominy toward Harrison's Landing. When first General McClellan began to intimate by his despatches that he designed making this movement toward James River, I suggm it, and urged upon him that he should send orders to Gen. McClellan that if he were unable to maintain his position upon tresident that the retreat to James River was carrying General McClellan away from any reinforcements that could possibly be so send any of the forces under my command to reenforce Gen. McClellan without rendering it certain that the enemy, even in tm upon the President and the Secretary of War. After General McClellan had taken up his position at Harrison's Landing, I adreply to this communication, I received a letter from General McClellan, very general in its terms, and proposing nothing towoperation between them, some military superior both of Gen. McClellan and myself should be called to Washington and placed i
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