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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 6: in Florida, 1856-57, and the Seminoles (search)
al fever. Many died and were buried in the little cemetery close at hand. Tampa was a field for selfdenial and Christian work. Hazzard at one time took me to task in a jocose manner and pointed out to me in his scholarly way certain discrepancies in the Bible and asked me how I accounted for them. I answered him that I could not then tell, but perhaps I might be able to explain them at some future time. At Yorktown, during our Civil War, Hazzard and I were walking together back of McClellan's works when a single round shot came rolling along the road and I thought I could strike it with my foot, but Hazzard cried out, It is going too fast! and pulled me back. At that time even he was asking me to explain to him how to become a Christian and get such peace as he thought that I had obtained. Of course I explained the matter to him as well as I could. It was not very long after that before one of those same round shot struck him in the thigh and gave him a mortal wound. His
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 7: at West Point as instructor, 1857-61; the outbreak of the Civil War (search)
with a little blood around her mouth. I instantly caught the child and turned her head downward, put my finger into her mouth and removed from her throat one of Guy's marbles that had remained there choking her for more than half an hour. The nurse had first run in the other direction to the cadets' hospital for the doctor, whom she did not find, before going for us. On December 20th a court of inquiry brought together Colonel Robert E. Lee, Major Robert Anderson, Captain R. B. Marcy (McClellan's father-in-law), and Captain Samuel Jones. Colonel Lee had been very kind to me when a cadet. I had known Major Anderson before — noticing then how tenderly he was caring for his invalid wife. Captain Samuel Jones had been my instructor when a cadet, and Captain Marcy and myself were on duty at the same posts in Florida. To pay my respects to them at the hotel was a real pleasure. A little later came the funeral of Colonel John Lind Smith of the Engineers. The whole corps of cade
brigade. The brigade thereafter faithfully guarded the approaches to Alexandria through many sore and dark days of discouragement, privation, and sickness, till McClellan, finally beginning to rebrigade and reorganize the army, ordered us to retire to a position nearer the Potomac. At the battle of Bull Run heavy losses were intented and hopeful. And commanders in the field took the utmost pains to reestablish and maintain discipline. Congress voted 500,000 more men to help us, and McClellan, conspicuous, with the reputation of successful generalship in West Virginia, was speedily called to the command of the departments of Washington and of Northeas a people, wise men will respect it. To violate the Sabbath weakens the soldiers who come from our churches and Sunday schools. With what a beautiful spirit General McClellan subsequently met this religious feeling in a superb order soon after issued: The major general commanding desires and requests that in future there may be a
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 12: General George B. McClellan and the organization of the army of the Potomac (search)
Chapter 12: General George B. McClellan and the organization of the army of the Potomac In Juidate for the Presidency in 1864. Indeed, McClellan holds no small place in the history of his cbattle of Malvern Iill. My first sight of McClellan was in 1850, when I was a cadet at West Poinnfold larger after the panic of Bull Run. McClellan instituted three remedial measures: First, arom the District of Columbia or keep still. McClellan also made another wholesome regulation. He istration felt their quick pulsation; not so McClellan. Nobody ever saw him in haste. Not long l Marcy, father-in-law and chief of staff to McClellan — the newly fledged brigadier feared that he on the public grounds east of the Capitol. McClellan was the conspicuous reviewing officer and Ca fallen in the war, like Lyon and Greble. McClellan's purpose in delaying the corps formation is that fall while criticising the slowness of McClellan. Munson's Hill armed the On-to-richmond pre[14 more...]
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 13: General E. V. Sumner and my first reconnoissance (search)
h the insurgents. It never appeared fair to McClellan to bind him by stringent orders and then at ng note to Buell the inference which came to McClellan from the President's known attitude — an infeven then loyal to humanity, maintained that McClellan was doing his simple duty and could not be cpionage from probing and revealing his plan, McClellan carefully guarded his lips. None of us couleek and Fredericksburg; 3d, that via Urbana, McClellan's favorite project; 4th, via the Virginia Peopposite Dumfries meant the Urbana route for McClellan and so no time was to be lost, because Johnsident, a large party faction urging him, and McClellan, in which several general officers took sidee a part. As a result of many councils, not McClellan's favorite Urbana project, but his second chorganize his Potomac force into army corps. McClellan complied on March 13th, so that Sumner, durirge enough to sleep on. The main body of McClellan's army, which had started up like a suddenly[16 more...]
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 14: the Peninsular campaign begun; Yorktown (search)
ction by giving his instructions directly to McClellan. Mr. Lincoln evidently had begun to distrusmmander's judgment. I am not surprised at McClellan's grievous complaint. I may confess, he sai a heavy blow, and with one constituted like McClellan it was so crippling and disappointing as to ses of the people really leading the press. McClellan's friends in the army had often offended thell unaccountable that Mr. Lincoln's faith in McClellan should have been gradually undermined. McCltically began this (March 11th) by relieving McClellan from the command of all other armies besidesime at Falmouth and Fredericksburg. Could McClellan instinctively have comprehended all this, heaffectionate warning. Here, then, we have McClellan and Johnston, each set apart to manipulate aed Alexandria on April 4th, three days after McClellan's departure for Fortress Monroe. The transpnance in the field. He said in parting: General McClellan wishes to get all his batteries in readi[20 more...]
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 15: the battle of Williamsburg (search)
iness, impatiently waiting all day the 4th. McClellan's first plan, made known later in the day, dn on the person of each soldier. Owing to McClellan's siege operations, General Johnston determiation. It is, indeed, a just charge against McClellan's information bureau; the want of informatiowas good generalship on his part to so blind McClellan as to his purpose. The withdrawal of the ensing troops were killed or wounded by them. McClellan soon set several Confederate prisoners of wation. He might possibly overwhelm a part of McClellan's forces before the remainder could wade thrSumner, being sent forward Sunday morning by McClellan to take care of everything at the front, heassatisfaction, bickering, and complaint that McClellan was induced about three o'clock in the afterorktown. The morning of the 4th, as soon as McClellan knew of the Confederate withdrawal, he instr marshaled against him at Williamsburg, that McClellan was sending a flotilla up the York River, to[1 more...]
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 16: the battle of Fair Oaks (search)
the battle of Fair Oaks By May 16, 1862, McClellan's force was reorganized so as to give to eac, May 27th, and returned to Mechanicsville. McClellan had placed his own headquarters not far fromtzelman, had passed over Bottom's Bridge. McClellan did not like to have his principal supplies m, far off on his right, he could not do so. McClellan therefore sent only two corps over the Chickied in width from two to three hundred feet. McClellan and his officers deprecated this division ofJohnston had in hand five strong divisions. McClellan could reenforce but slowly from the north ofextraordinary circumstance Heintzelman, whom McClellan looked to as the veritable commander of all ny, opposite the battlefield. An order from McClellan restraining him from moving without permissi. He walked up and down like a caged lion. McClellan first telegraphed him to be ready. He was rline. The commander of the whole battle was McClellan at his headquarters several miles away. The
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 17: Second battle of Bull Bun (search)
At that time I warmly espoused the cause of McClellan and resented every criticism as an aspersion, in his own discomfiture on the peninsula. McClellan's Seven Days Battles, in which he had repulso act. After reaching Harrison's Landing, McClellan entreated to remain there, be reinforced, anmmand. It was a touch of human nature for McClellan to reply with reserve and some coldness; pargin direct operations against Richmond; that McClellan, when brought back by water from the peninsuorce him. Pope was to be bold, so as to free McClellan from pressure, and enable him to speedily transport his army to the Potomac. This McClellan did. Pope promptly concentrated, bringing Fremohe would take care of his right, for was not McClellan's army coming in its strength? There was, fenton, to meet there the reinforcements from McClellan, the problem of the campaign would have beenHooker's and Kearny's divisions, coming from McClellan before Jackson's arrival at Bristoe, had pas[4 more...]
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 18: the battle of South Mountain (search)
ied his personal preferences and called back McClellan, his former though fretful lieutenant. fromarmy turned over to Pope piecemeal. He gave McClellan command of all the scattered forces then in strict of Columbia. A vein of confidence in McClellan as a safe leader ran through the forces — inry, had completely turned Miles's position. McClellan then asked Halleck to have Miles move from Hctories, while he was making ready to defeat McClellan's large army. All the while this rich regioree days and a part of another passed before McClellan had in his hand the hostile plan; he was thrt follow: First, Lee might be caught, as was McClellan on the Chickahominy, with an army worse diviroute westward toward Lee. On September 13th McClellan simplified his organization. The right wingin was disappointed by Miles's surrender and McClellan chagrined, yet they had done their best. ront. Hooker was at the head of his corps. McClellan in person gave him orders on the field to pr[6 more...]
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