hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Daily Dispatch: August 26, 1861., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 27, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 18 results in 8 document sections:

vities, and made no secret of her correspondence with the leaders of the Confederate army. After a hearing, she was sent to Washington. Augustus Schaffer, of Gloucester, N. J., belonging to Capt. Towns' Philadelphia Company of Cavalry, was severely wounded in the head yesterday, by a pistol ball, while out with a scouting party towards Fairfax Court-House. This has been an eventful day with the military men in the Department of Alexandria, caused by a review of the division by Gen. McClellan and his staff. The customary salute was fired, and the new General expressed himself as highly pleased with the condition of the troops. The new order in relation to passes between here and Washington is now rigidly enforced much so the inconvenience of those who are unable to prove their loyalty. A large number of Alexandrian were unable to return some to-night, as Provost Marshal Porter, of Washington, requires all receiving passes to be personally vouched for as Union men.
Nine hundred cannon. General McClellan, it is said, has ordered nine hundred rifled cannon for the Army of Invasion. After the liberal-provision made by General Scott for the Confederate Army, this is exceedingly generous. General McClellan has yet to learn that it is men, not arms, that he requires, and can never get, not because the North is destitute of courage, but because no land can produce a soldiery which can conquer such a people as the South, fighting in defence of their homesnnon. General McClellan, it is said, has ordered nine hundred rifled cannon for the Army of Invasion. After the liberal-provision made by General Scott for the Confederate Army, this is exceedingly generous. General McClellan has yet to learn that it is men, not arms, that he requires, and can never get, not because the North is destitute of courage, but because no land can produce a soldiery which can conquer such a people as the South, fighting in defence of their homes and firesides.
arp-Shooters, Capt. Tompkins, 23d Regiment Virginia Volunteers, Col. Taliaferro, now in the Northwest, at Monterey. They did all the skirmishing at Laurel Hill, and stood their ground and fought without flinching at Carrick's Ford, on Cheat River, during the retreat, ten of whom were sent with General Garnett and stood by him when he was shot, one of whom was shot by the side of, and fell at the same time as the General. No mention is even made of sending them anything. They are all mechanics from this city. Many are the only support of aged parents and families. Something ought to be done for this company, which will and is always ready to do its duty." The praise bestowed on the Sharp-Shooters they fully deserve. Second Sergeant A. P. LeCuyer, who was taken prisoner at Rich Mountain and paroled by Gen. McClellan, who is now in Richmond, will take pleasure in sending any articles which may be designed for the company, if they are left at Michaud's Saloon, Belvin's Block.
Arrests. --Up to Sunday afternoon the police had arrested the following parties: John Rankin, for drunkenness, and abuse of an officer who requested him to desist from making a noise. --Richard, slave of Ro. Payne, for running from an officer. The party had no pass, and was ordered fifteen lashes.--John B. McClellan was locked up for effecting a forcible entrance into Catherine Thompson's house and breaking up her furniture.--Yesterday morning Michael Lamey was put in the cage for assaulting his wife.
neral movement of the army was kept profoundly secret from its own officers, few of whom knew that it was to take place. The Confederate army, it is asserted, crossed the Potomac last night in force, notwithstanding the high state of the river was supposed to be a check upon such a movement. This bold and reckless course of Gen. Johnston is remarkable, as it divides his forces and places in his rear a wide river to hinder his retreat, which is certain to take place. Gen. Scott and Gen. McClellan will meet the occasion, for which they are fully prepared. The case of Mr. Bosley. The Baltimore Exchange, of the 23d, contains the following in relation to the arrest of Mr. Bosley, of that city: This gentleman, whose arrest has already been noticed, had a further examination yesterday before U. S. Commissioner Hanan, upon the charge of obstructing the passage of the Massachusetts Sixth Regiment through Pratt street on the 19th of April. Several witnesses were examined o
ointments, &C — a Pase to cross the Potomac Denied to Mr.Russell--disloyal officialsin the Departments. Washington, Aug. 23. --There are no apparent signs of hostilities. A feeling of perfect security prevails throughout the entire community, (including Lincoln himself.) Military men say, with ordinary reliance on raw troops, there is not the least danger. [Of course not — the men at Washington and their Generals all know this!] Senator Wilson has been appointed one of Gen. McClellan's staff. [He can run well.] Lieut Colonel Ripley has been appointed Brigadier General. Gen. Butler has been detailed by the Government to command the volunteers at Fort Potter. The committee of Congress, appointed to sake an investigation into the disposition of Government officials, reported twelve disloyally many disaffected in the War Department; twenty disloyal and seven suspected in the interior Department [There is something often in Denmark] The correspondent
Held to bail. --The Mayor yesterday required the following parties to give bail for their good behavior, on the charge of disturbing the peace. Failing to do so, they were locked up, viz: George L. Bloomer, Albert Elfe, John B. McClellan, and Michael Lanney.
which were in regular drill.'" The same paper mentions the arrest of Geo. W. Smith, Esq., of Bryantown, on Monday, and adds: "Mr. Smith is well known to the citizens of this county as our late Sheriff, and we must confess our utter surprise at his arrest. A more innocent, harmless man we scarcely knew." Mr. Smith has since been released by the order of the authorities at Washington. Major General M'Clellan's staff. The following order is the first issued by General McClellan since taking command of his new department: Headquarters army of the Potomac, Washington, August 20, 1861. General Orders No. 1.--In accordance with general order No. 15, of August 17, 1861, from the headquarters of the army, I hereby assume the command of the Potomac, comprising the troops serving in the former departments of Washington and Northeastern Virginia, in the valley of the Shenandoah, and in the States of Maryland and Delaware. The organization of the command i