Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 18, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for McClellan or search for McClellan in all documents.

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seem to be undecided, and characteristic of pusillanimity. Whenever they may determine to advance, so sure will their defeat be inevitable.--Our men seem weary of inactivity, and feel confident that, with proper generalship, they can demolish McClellan's forces in one day's fair and open fight. This opinion may be secretly entertained by McClellan himself, for no other reasons can be assigned for his backwardness and temerity in not accepting the range of battle tendered him daily for the pa undecided, and characteristic of pusillanimity. Whenever they may determine to advance, so sure will their defeat be inevitable.--Our men seem weary of inactivity, and feel confident that, with proper generalship, they can demolish McClellan's forces in one day's fair and open fight. This opinion may be secretly entertained by McClellan himself, for no other reasons can be assigned for his backwardness and temerity in not accepting the range of battle tendered him daily for the past month.
from the Federal War Department--attack on Gen. McClellan--Development of the great man Hitchcock — r, what was the posture of affairs under General McClellan's plan and direction? The country was uas the York river would have been open for Gen. McClellan's march upon Richmond. Their request was . We will not stop to conjecture what Gen. McClellan's plan was, and we have no right to state ile expressing, as we have, our faith in General McClellan as the commander of an army — all the moanton that the New York Tribune attacked General McClellan. It is almost the only newspaper on our trace to Mr. Stanton complaints against General McClellan as the head of an army, and it is simplyoth for the safety of Washington, and that Gen. McClellan might be aided by a flank movement under Gand by sending so large a portion of it to Gen. McClellan, beyond agreement, if not in full complian Gen. Banks grew out of and was in aid of, Gen. McClellan's wishes and his call for more troops. Fu[16 more...]<
The braggart. McClellan is reported by his Yankee correspondents to have said that if the fight on his left had commenced two hours earlier on Saturday, the 31st of May, he would have been in Rit up by expedients to which no man of genuine merit and honor would ever resort. The plan of McClellan's operations is the conception of that hoary sinner, Gen. Scott, and McClellan is simply a parMcClellan is simply a part of the machinery which the old reprobate, who is only nominally retired, continues to work for the destruction of his native State.--Let any one compare the official communications of Gens. Johnston and Beauregard with those of McClellan, and the difference between the true soldier and the blustering pretender will at once he manifest. The Confederate Generals let their deeds speak for them; hen they have occasion to write, their communications are laconic, comprehensive, and modest. McClellan, on the contrary, is always writing sensation dispatches. He has mistaken his vocation. It i
The United States and England. It is clear from many unmistakable, indications, that the Northern people and Government are profoundly indignant at the conduct of England in this war. That hate is none the less intense, because prudence and policy require it for the time to be suppressed. The remark attributed to McClellan that, as soon as he had succeeded in reconstructing the Union, his great desire was to see both sections unite in a war against England, expresses the sentiment of the great mass of the Northern nation. It is in vain that England has marked out for herself a course of rigid neutrality. Her very first step, in acknowledging the South a belligerent power, gave mortal offence to the Federal Government, which regards the South as a rebel, and expects the whole world to do the same. The expressions of public sentiment in her press in favor of the South, and above all, the Mason and Slidell affair, have enkindled in the Northern mind a degree of rancor and haire
McClellan's report of his Losses. --Gen, McClellan's official statement of the Federal loss in the battle below Richmond is as follows: Killed, eight hundred and ninety; wounded, three thousand six hundred and twenty- seven; missing, one thousand two hundred and twenty-two, making a grand total of killed wounded and missing of five thousand seven hundred and thirty-nine. McClellan's report of his Losses. --Gen, McClellan's official statement of the Federal loss in the battle below Richmond is as follows: Killed, eight hundred and ninety; wounded, three thousand six hundred and twenty- seven; missing, one thousand two hundred and twenty-two, making a grand total of killed wounded and missing of five thousand seven hundred and thirty-nine.