Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 26, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for McClellan or search for McClellan in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

McClellan's Departure. Dr. Minge, who has been at Westover nearly ever since the arrival of McClellan's army there has arrived in this city. He reports that the last of the Yankee army has left, leaving behind a number of stragglers and deserters. The ground where they last camped is strewn with cast-off uniforms, broken and injured muskets, crackers, &c. The doctor saw nineteen Yankees throw their muskets in the water and swim a creek in deserting. With the exception of restriction upMcClellan's army there has arrived in this city. He reports that the last of the Yankee army has left, leaving behind a number of stragglers and deserters. The ground where they last camped is strewn with cast-off uniforms, broken and injured muskets, crackers, &c. The doctor saw nineteen Yankees throw their muskets in the water and swim a creek in deserting. With the exception of restriction upon his liberty, Dr. Minge was well treated by the general officers with whom he came in contact.--Nearly all of them, particularly Gens. Kearney and Fitzjohn Porter, behaved as gentlemen. The former remarked one day that the Confederates had one advantage over the Federal, and that was, if one of their Generals was killed they had an abundance of good ones to fill his place, which was not the case with their enemies. He also remarked when he arrived at Westover, after the seven day's fighting
Punch's account of the "Change of Base." A copy of the London Punch, lately received, contains the following veritable account of McClellan's grand strategic movement: Punch's Office, No. 85 Fleet st., July 26, 1862. Latest American Dispatch — By Hersemarine Telegraph. Camp Chickabiddy Chokee, Monday afternoon--The Federal troops have won another splendid victory. Seeing that the rebels were approaching in great force at 6 A. M. this morning, 1 issued my directions for a general advance, an order which our brave fellows were prompt to carry out. The advance was made in the identical direction as that in which the rebel army were proceeding, and was achieved, I need not say, with the most complete success. Astonishing to say, the whole of our front line escaped without a hurt, and, with the exception of a few slight wounds and bruises in the rear, I really have no casualties worth mention to report. A good deal of our baggage and some few hundred stand of arm
arms this fortunate escape from disaster and, perhaps, destruction. To-day the old bridge across Hampton Creek was rebuilt, and a pontoon bridge was laid across near to it. A force of cavalry arrived at Hampton about noon to-day. A large number of troops are in camp about two miles this side of Newport News to-night. A large baggage train is now at Hampton. Gen. Burnside is now at Fortress Monroe, and there is some talk of his taking command of the army now in command of Gen. McClellan. That a portion of this army must remain on the Peninsula is evident, and between Hampton and Yorktown. As there are 20 acres covered by hospitals at Hampton a railroad is now being completed between there and Fortress Monroe. Miscellaneous. A Fredericksburg correspondent of the Herald, under date of August 17, says Gen. Burnside has inaugurated the assumption of his command in that vicinity with prompt measures to repress the command which in progress between Richmond a