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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opening of the lower Mississippi. (search)
it is a barrier against our forces. Come, let us go and see General McClellan. At that time General McClellan commanded the Army of theGeneral McClellan commanded the Army of the Potomac, and was in the zenith of his power. He held the confidence of the President and the country, and was engaged in organizing a largerinted in The Galaxy for November, 1871, says: The President, General McClellan, and the two gentlemen named [Assistant-Secretary Fox and Comconference.--Editors. the Secretary of State, and we proceeded to McClellan's headquarters, where we found that officer diligently engaged inur plans, and let me have your report as soon as possible. General McClellan and myself were then left to talk the matter over and draw up the plan of operations. With a man of McClellan's energy, it did not take long to come to a conclusion; and, although he had some difficultet to work to prepare the naval part of the expedition, while General McClellan prepared the military part. The officer selected to command
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Farragut's capture of New Orleans. (search)
ral Porter has learned to think that he chose the commander of the expedition. That he could have defeated Farragut's appointment is probably true, but that he chose him is a mistake; he simply assented to the previous choice of Mr. Welles and Mr. Fox. (See articles by Welles and Blair, above referred to.) Ex-Secretary Welles relates that the armament of the fleet had been determined, before Farragut's appointment to the command, after consultation with the War Department and with General McClellan, who detailed General Butler to command the land forces of the expedition. Porter, whose advice was listened to, insisted on the importance of a fleet of schooners carrying 13-inch mortars, and asserted that a bombardment of forty-eight hours would reduce Forts Jackson and St. Philip to a heap of ruins. Mr. Welles says that Mr. Fox, who was a trained naval officer, at first objected to the mortars, and advocated running by the forts with the fleet, but finally was won over by the for
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the operations at New Orleans, La. (search)
  1     1 Defiance, Capt. Joseph D. McCoy         1       1 Resolute, Capt. Isaac Hooper       1 1       2 General Lovell, Capt. Burdett Paris         1       1 R. J. Breckinridge, Capt. James Smith.           1     1 Total 2 4 4 10 15 2 1 2 40 Unarmed tugs. Landis, Captain Davis, and W. Burton, Captain Hammond (tenders to the Louisiana); Phoenix, Captain James Brown (tender to the Manassas); Mosher, Captain Sherman, and Belle Algerine, Captain Jackson (k); Music, Captain McClellan (tender to the forts); Star, Captain Laplace (telegraph boat). The last four were chartered by the army. Grand total of Confederate guns, 166. Confederate Army. Major-General Mansfield Lovell. Coast defenses, Brig.-Gen. Johnson K. Duncan. forts Jackson and St. Philip, Lieut.-Col. Edward Higgins. Fort Jackson: La. Scouts and Sharp-shooters, Capt. W. G. Mullen; St. Mary's (La.) Cannoneers, Capt. F. O. Cornay; other company and battery commanders, Cap
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., McClellan organizing the grand Army. (search)
ere assigned to duty as military attaches on McClellan's staff. His brilliant operations in Westerd troops placed in McClellan's hands. See McClellan in West Virginia, by General J. D. Cox, Vol.r: sir: I received yesterday from Major-General McClellan a letter of that date, to which I design this as my only reply. Had Major-General McClellan presented the same views in person, they wot 10th, at the request of the President, General McClellan gave the latter authority to withdraw thand augured ill of the youth and rashness of McClellan. The latter, on the other hand, seemed to ihe railway station the commander whose place McClellan was about to occupy. As we went along everyimpassable condition of the roads. This set McClellan, as well as many of his subordinates, to thiher, was not yet ready, and no one more than McClellan regretted the delay. It is well known that of the United States, the pretext being that McClellan had not taken the field on the 22d of Februa[45 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Ball's Bluff and the arrest of General Stone. (search)
McCall's division being at Dranesville, General McClellan telegraphed to General Stone directing accepted nor declined the appointment. General McClellan was then the only other officer in the All reconnoitering beyond Dranesville. General McClellan says he thinks notice was sent to Generanowledge.--R. B. I. It was thus that General McClellan, no less just than generous to his sub-oneral Stone's, while, on the other hand, General McClellan and General Stone protested against the sought to be avoided. It cannot avail. General McClellan's statement is explicit, that Mr. Stantoo at the solicitation of the committee. General McClellan was one of the most truthful of men. Mr. has never been told. It is soon done. General McClellan asked that General Stone might be heard was informally suspended in deference to General McClellan's express statement to the Secretary, th secret surveillance, be so considered. General McClellan in vain applied for him. General Hooker'[4 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Operations of 1861 about Fort Monroe. (search)
there was crockery in the bottom of the carriage. The effects of this battle have been variously stated. Save as an encouragement to the Confederates, it had no important result. After the battle of Big Bethel and up to the arrival of General McClellan the events of the war in and around Fort Monroe were, with few exceptions, of minor importance. On July 1st, 1861, Brigadier-General Peirce, under orders from General Butler, occupied Hampton, and at once proceeded to intrench. In this woal Viele at Norfolk and was assigned to the command of the exterior lines of defense at Portsmouth. The delays occurring in forwarding and pushing the troops allowed the Confederates time to burn the Navy Yard at Portsmouth, and to destroy the shipping. These troops remained at Norfolk until about June 1st, when we received orders to report to McClellan at Fair Oaks. General Wool was relieved of his command soon after the affair at Norfolk, and General John A. Dix was appointed in his stead.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 4.19 (search)
tched from shore to shore fifty feet above the bridge, and the upper end of each boat was stayed to the cable by a smaller rope. The rushing bent the bridge into a half-moon curve. The clock-like precision with which these men worked showed them to be the drilled engineers and pontoniers of the regular army. After the bridge was built, a slight, short man, with sandy hair, in military dress, came out upon it and congratulated the engineers on their success. This unassuming man was George B. McClellan, commander of the Army of the Potomac. It was on this boat-bridge that the army of General Banks crossed to the Virginia shore in 1862. Officers were not allowed to trot their horses; troops in crossing were given the order, Route step, as the oscillation of the cadence step or trotting horse is dangerous to the stability of a bridge of any kind. I crossed the bridge soon after it was laid, visited Jefferson Rock, the ruins of the burned armory, and the town in general. The oc
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
The Peninsular campaign. George B. McClellan, Major-General, U. S. A. Fort Monroe--parade of the 3d Pennsylvania Artillerv. From a photograph. In the following pages I purpose to give a brief sketch of the Peninsular campaign of 1862. As it is impossible, within the limits available, to describe even the most important battles, I shall confine myself to strategical considerations. But even this requires a rapid review of the circumstances under which, from a small assemblage of uApril 11th, 1863. General L. Thomas, Adjutant-General, U. S. A., Washington. General: I find in the New York Tribune of the 8th of April a preliminary report of the operations of the Army of the Potomac, since June 25th, 1862, made by General G. B. McClellan, ... in a paragraph commencing on the 28th Porter's Corps was also moved across the White Oak Swamp, etc., is the following: they were ordered to hold this position until dark, then to fall back across the Swamp and rejoin the r
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
nd strength of each army as here stated give the gist of all the data obtainable in the Official Records. K stands for killed; w for wounded; m w for mortally wounded; m for captured or missing; c for captured. The Union forces. Major-General George B. McClellan. Brigadier-General Edwin V. Sumner, second in command. Third Army Corps, Brigadier-General Samuel P. Heintzelman. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Joseph Hooker. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Cuvier Grover: 1st Mass., Col. Robert CowdinFitch; A, 1st N. Y., Capt. Thomas H. Bates; H, 1st N. Y., Capt. Joseph Spratt. advance-guard, Brig.-Gen. George Stoneman. Brig.-Gen. P. St. George Cooke and William H. Emory, brigade commanders. Cavalry: 8th Ill., Col. John F. Farnsworth; McClellan (11.) Dragoons, Maj. Charles W. Barker; 3d Pa., Col. William W. Averell; 1st U. S., Lieut.-Col. William N. Grier; 6th U. S., Maj. Lawrence Williams. Artillery, Lieut.-Col. William Hays: B and L, 2d U. S., Capt. James M. Robertson; M, 2d U. S.,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Confederate use of subterranean shells on the Peninsula. (search)
ion of life. . . . It is admissible to plant shells in a parapet to repel an assault, or in a wood to check pursuit, because the object is to save the work in one case and the army in the other A copy of the New York Herald, containing General McClellan's report on buried torpedoes at Yorktown, reached General Johnston, who, in a letter dated May 12th, requested General D. H. Hill to ascertain if there was any truth in it. General Hill referred the matter to Rains, who on May 14th reported in part as follows: I commanded at Yorktown for the last seven months, and when General McClellan approached with his army of 100,000 men and opened his cannons upon us, I had but 2500 in garrison, and our whole Army of the Peninsula, under Major-General Magruder, amounted to but 9300 effective men; then at a salient angle, an accessible point of our works, as part of the defenses thereof, I had the land mined with the weapons alluded to, to destroy assailants and prevent escalade. Subsequ
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