Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 17, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for George B. McClellan or search for George B. McClellan in all documents.

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Bitter attack on Gen. McClellan. [Special Washington Correspondence of the N. Y. Tribune, March 13th.] Why George B. McClellan was called to the onerous and responsible position he has held forormed circles, it is still asserted that Captain McClellan was selected by the other two members of. Each member published a book, and that of McClellan is the smallest and most inconsiderable of tels. The campaign in Western Virginia where McClellan, by virtue of his Major-Generalship, was senrossing the Long Bridge, instantly indicated McClellan as the man to supplant Mcllowell. Preciselyck estan express railway train can run, George B. McClellan appeared in Washington, and assumed theof the Potomac, whether its nominal board be McClellan, McDowell, or Hallack, or Fremont, or the Prpinion of the best informed army officers, Gen. McClellan is not entitled to the slightest credit foe. And yet, for the reasons already given. McClellan will move forward, and, if he finds the foe,
g lie about Island No.10. The Herald says: "A vague uneasiness with regard to the Merrimac and the success of Major-Gen. McClellan's operations on the Peninsula operates to check business" The British war ships from Vera Cruz have brought tur forces. One thing appears certain, that the rebels are concentrating their troops to resist the onward march of General McClellan, and by Gen. Magruder's orders, which we publish to-day, it will be received that the rebels had their defensive wo in good order, and ready for action on the 13th of March, in anticipation of this very movement so recently made by Gen. McClellan. It also appears certain that one hundred thousand rebel troops are a Yorktown, and about fifty thousand more in the to keep our ships-of-war all there; watching the actions of the rebel trait, so that if it should be part of the of Gen. McClellan to have the gunboats to assist him in his movements along the Peninsula, the presence of the Merrimac alone, it is su
e Confederate army is strong in numbers, but indifferently equipped, and less carefully disciplined than inst. under Gen. McClellan. The relative advantages of the rival forces have been not unfairly contrasted by Southern critics. The Confederateand, are superior in artillery, in supplies, and in materials generally; they have larger resources to back them, and Gen. McClellan, with a clear perception of what was lacking, has labored incessantly to give his army that mechanical power which sp entrenchments by which Washington is protected, and behind which the Federal troops would fight to great advantage. Gen. McClellan dares not invade a country impassable for his artillery and baggage, and occupied by a wary enemy who has twice takenof 1854, though that was the first year of the Crimean War. The charge of a battalion of infantry, 1,000 strong, in General McClellan's force, all military costs included, would be 200,000l, or at the rate of 200l a head. By this reckoning an Ameri
its expenditures have been enormous. But the winter has come and gone, and the South remains as defiant as ever and indomitable. Even Virginia has not yet fallen in their hands. The city of Nashville is theirs, but they have met a Corinth. McClellan's enormous host is not yet in Richmond, which, if it fall into their hands, would be only a city of forty thousand inhabitants, not the Southern Confederacy. Nor is McClellan here yet. A lion is in his path. He has changed his front from the st is not yet in Richmond, which, if it fall into their hands, would be only a city of forty thousand inhabitants, not the Southern Confederacy. Nor is McClellan here yet. A lion is in his path. He has changed his front from the Potomac to the Peninsula; he may have to change again before long. Meantime the spring has come; the burning sun of the South will soon spread havoc among the invaders of the South, and the diseases of the climate will prove more terrible than an army with banners.