Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 11, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for George B. McClellan or search for George B. McClellan in all documents.

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ver. This is probably true, and although the War Department has no authentic intelligence of the fact, it is generally conceded that probabilities tend to confirm the report. Before another advance on Richmond — if another is ever attempted — McClellan must reorganize his army, and it is scarcely to be supposed that he would select a point so remote from the seacoast as Berkeley for this purpose. It is much more likely that he will, permitted to do so, withdraw his army from the swamps and 't care which side whipped. A Yankee surgeon overhearing the conversation, immediately approached and ordered the indiscreet soldier to resume his vocation of fanning the wounded men, and not talk so much. Persons who left Baltimore as late as the 5th of July, represent that the news of McClellan's reverse before Richmond occasioned greet rejoicing among the "rebel sympathizers" in the city. It was with difficulty that an open demonstration of joy was repressed by the Federal rulers
The "official" report of McClellan The following excellent satire on "George's" reports has been furnished by a correspondent. It is a capital piece of humor: Headquarters army of Potomac,Near Gunboats on James River, July 9th, 1862. Hon. Ed. M. Stanton, Sec. War, U. S. A.: It may seem a misnomer for the Army of James River to be called the Army of the Potomac, and it may excite surprise that my address is "Near the Gunboats" instead of "Richmond, Va;" but I have just executed a grand strategic movement. Nothing equal to it was performed at Sebastopol. That the enlightened public of Boston and New York may understand the magnificent conception and execution of this wonderful plan, I will make a brief statement. On the 26th of June I enticed across the Chickahominy the rebel Generals Jackson, Longstreet, D. H. Hill, and A. P. Hill, for the purpose of annihilating them, when separated from their reserves. The works at Mechanicsville, though very stro
McClellan's Latest address to the "Grand Army." We publish this amusing document in another column. It will be received with about of derision from one end of the Confederate States to the other. The Whig says "for cool, brazen, mendacious eas his " The language of the Whig is too strong. It belokens angry feeling, and surely the Whig cannot feel angry with McClellan new, however it might have felt a month ago. It is not Christian to be enraged with a corps. Let the Whig curb its temure of contempt as it can afford to spare to an object so Immeasurably below the proper level of contempt. We pity McClellan from the bottom of our hearts. No man that we recollect to have heard of ever experienced such a succession of humiliahrust upon him, he had been defeated in nine pitched battles within the space of two months?. Such has been the case of McClellan. He has been all his life a jackdaw, strutting in borrowed plumes — an clothed in the skin of a lion. He made a repu
is that both armies will keep the field, yet there can be little doubt that the spirit of the campaign must languish until fall, when cool weather and reinforcements on both sides will allow the struggle to be renewed. The last news represents what may be looked upon as the closing scenes of the spring campaign. Though the Federal have so many more men, and such a vast army and the greatest resources, they invariably describe themselves as outnumbered by the Confederates. Halleck and McClellan utter the same complaint. Foot and powder must have been the cry of the Confederate force, which numbered 120,000 at Corinth, and being equal, if not superior, to the forces opposed to it, was yet obliged to retreat southward, and is now posted in decreased numbers at Grenada. Kentuckians and Tennesseeans might, argue that since their own States have been abandoned, and fallen under the yoke of the Federal, they had no further interest in defending the cotton States, to which they w
56,000 men, killed, wounded and prisoners. This estimate is corroborated by every person we have conversed with who had an opportunity to form a judgment. Including the battle of Williamsburg, and the loss from sickness, we fee convinced that McClellan is a sufferer, since he landed on the fatal peninsulas, to the fine of at least 80,000 men. Our own loss — putting that in the last battles at 13,000 killed. wounded and missing, is about 25,000 in the last three months. McClellan has been seveconversed with who had an opportunity to form a judgment. Including the battle of Williamsburg, and the loss from sickness, we fee convinced that McClellan is a sufferer, since he landed on the fatal peninsulas, to the fine of at least 80,000 men. Our own loss — putting that in the last battles at 13,000 killed. wounded and missing, is about 25,000 in the last three months. McClellan has been several times reinforced, on one occasion by 40,000 men. He has now probably, shout 70,000 with hi
McClellan's defeat in New Orleans Mobile, July 9. --The New Orleans Delta says: We are in possession of Mobile papers of the 2nd instant, containing a series of telegrams from Richmond and other points. The substance of these dispatches is that McClellan has been defeated.--We reproduce these telegrams because versions of them are in the hands of speculators imposing upon the public; but we do not believe them. If they are true, all that can be gained by a repulse of the Union army McClellan has been defeated.--We reproduce these telegrams because versions of them are in the hands of speculators imposing upon the public; but we do not believe them. If they are true, all that can be gained by a repulse of the Union army is to prolong the struggle. The Picayune copies from the Delta, with this heading: "We have read the following note from General Butler:" "Editors Picayune--Gentlemen: There is in the city, and you have had in your office, an extra, which sets right all news from Richmond down to July 2d. Why desire to publish false intelligence, as is the reliable man's lies of June 30. Publish anything but the Richmond dispatches, and you may publish them if you will publish this note."
Yankee Trick. A soldier from Georgia picked up on the battlefield, a Yankee "Richmond Dispatch," which had been dropped by some dead Yankee. We have not yet seen it, but persons who have, say it is a curi It is exactly like this paper. The size, paper, advertisements and all are precisely the same. The only difference is in the editorials. The Yankee concern is full of desponding and despairing editorials, which pronounce our cause desperate and say that McClellan is obliged to take the city. These counterfeits are no doubt sent North, and used in keeping up the popular delusion there. --Possibly, other Southern papers may be counterfeited too. Was there ever a nation so thoroughly hear?
arrison's Landing, on the 4th inst., describes General McClellan as coming on board the main boat greatly perturbed. "General McClellan," we are told, "met General Patterson as he stepped on board, laid his hand on his shh from Fair Oaks, a distance of thirty miles.--General McClellan, however, claimed that his troops "had fought t side of the Chickahominy, and threatens not only McClellan's right wing but the navigation of the James riveration of the river would be laying direct siege to McClellan's position, and would place his army in a critical situation. Gen. McClellan rode out among his troops on Wednesday, and was greeted with most enthusiasticibune.] I understand that Gen. Marcy, Chief of McClellan's staff, estimates the entire loss of McClellan's McClellan's army at $30,000. A Federal wagon train was attacked by a small hand of Confederate guerrillas, near Flint t what it may in time, treasure, and blood. Geo. B. McClellan, Major General Commanding. Dr. Plumer