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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 231 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 172 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 115 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 90 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 89 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 69 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 16 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for H. B. McClellan or search for H. B. McClellan in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia, or the boys in gray, as I saw them from Harper's Ferry in 1861 to Appomattox Court-house in 1865. (search)
Hill was started (with his own regiment, the Tenth Virginia, and the Third Tennessee) to make a march to Romney, forty-three miles west of Winchester, for the purpose of meeting a reported advance in that direction of his old West Point chum, McClellan. I well remember the scene on the streets of Winchester, as we marched through, amid the waving of handkerchiefs by the ladies and the shouts of the crowd; the hospitality of the good people along the route, who supplied us with buttermilk anded with two pieces of captured artillery and several stand of colors, each man was a hero in the eyes of his comrades as well as his own, and the rest of us felt deep chagrin that we had not belonged to the chosen band. It being settled that McClellan would not advance by that route, we were marched back to the neighborhood of Winchester. Colonel Elzey, of the First Maryland regiment, was now put in command of our brigade, which was made to consist of the Thirteenth Virginia, Third Tennesse
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Summer campaign of 1863-report of General W. E. Jones. (search)
Summer campaign of 1863-report of General W. E. Jones. Headquarters Jones's brigade, Rixeyville, Va., July 30, 1863. Major H. B. McClellan, A. A. G., Cavalry Divisions: Major,--I respectfully report the operations of my command from the 29th of June to the 14th of July. At the date first mentioned the Sixth, Seventh and Eleventh regiments of Virginia cavalry left Snickersville and joined Brigadier General Robertson at Berryville. The Twelfth Virginia cavalry having been sent to picket towards Harper's Ferry, was left on that duty. The 30th of June a part of this regiment under Lieutenants Harmon and Baylor surprised and captured a cavalry picket of the enemy on Bolivar Heights. They killed one and captured twenty-one, including two officers, with all their arms, horses, and equipments. White's battalion, which was detached at Brandy Station, has not been reporting its operations. The three remaining regiments of the brigade accompanied General Robertson by way of W
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
battle was formed, he took a musket and was among the foremost in the charge as we dashed forward and cleared the wood to and beyond the Loudoun and Hampshire Railroad, causing the long roll to beat and the troops to turn out formiles along General McClellan's front. It was my privilege to see a good deal of Stuart at this period, at his Headquarters, on a red blanket, spread under a pine tree on Munson's hill. His athletic frame indicating that he was a splendid war machine — his lofty foreld, when Stuart would call for volunteers to drive in the enemy's pickets, or amuse himself with having Rosser's artillery practice at Professor Lowe's balloon, or sending up a kite with lantern attached, or causing the long roll to beat along McClellan's whole front, by sending up sky-rockets at night from different points. On the 11th of September, Stuart took 305 men of the Thirteenth Virginia, two companies of his cavalry, and two pieces of Rosser's battery, and advanced on Lewinsville,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee's offensive policy in the campaign of 1864. (search)
so much as an open field and a fair fight. He again and again expressed himself to that effect, and always said that if the enemy were allowed to besiege Richmond the result would be a mere question of time. The following letter to one of his corps commanders brings out clearly his views and purposes. If General Grant had not crossed the James and advanced on Petersburg, Lee would have attacked him in his works, and have tried on him the same tactics which proved so successful against McClellan in 1862. Of course no one can now tell certainly what the result would have been, but General Lee and his ragged veterans were confident of a splendid victory. The letter, however, speaks for itself: Headquarters 12:30 P. M., June, 1864. General,--I have received your note of 11 A. M. I am glad that you are able to make the disposition of the troops you propose, as it meets my views as expressed in a former note to you. Now that you have your troops in a line I hope you will str
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
eat so often the overwhelming hosts of the North, which were composed largely of foreigners to our soil; in fact, the majority were mercenaries whom large bounties induced to enlist, while the stay-at-home patriots whose money bought them, body and boots, to go off and get killed instead of their own precious selves, said, let the war go on. The men that went from principle, as a rule, and who would fight, were those volunteers who sprang to arms at the first, without thought of pay or bounty. What was $11 per month to the men such as the Zouaves were composed of, many of whom left splendid positions? One of its captains was a retired merchant, worth at least $300,000. After a time we had every reason to be disgusted, to see how our army was used by the constant interference of vulgar politicians, and the wise men and advisers in Washington — the busybodies, who were always handicapping McClellan, and thwarting his plans, because he was a Democrat. Pardon me for this long letter.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
may have facts bearing on the question to send them forward at once. Jeb. Stuart's correspondence at Lewinsville we quoted from a version we had at the time of its occurrence, but we are very much gratified to receive from our friend, Major McClellan, the following exact copy of the original: Lexington, Ky., 12th April, 1881. Rev. J. Wm. Jones: My Dear Sir,--In your interesting Reminiscences, published in the last No. of the Southern Historical Society Papers, you make mention en General Stuart and some of his old army comrades about the time of the outpost affair near Lewinsville, Virginia, in 1861. I happen to have the original document in my possession, and send you herewith a copy. Yours, very sincerely, H. B. Mcclellan. Lewinsville, September 11th, 1861. My Dear Beauty,--I am sorry that circumstances are such that I can't have the pleasure of seeing you, although so near you. Griffin says he would like to have you dine with him at Willard's at 5
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Expedition to Hardy and Hampshire. (search)
n direction of Moorefield, evading the enemy, who had forced the gap and got in my rear, and brought out safely all my prisoners and cattle. Upon the expedition I captured twelve or thirteen hundred head of cattle, five or six hundred sheep, ninety-five wagons and eighty prisoners. Only fifty of the wagons were saved and brought to the valley. Everything else is now safe in the valley. I am, Major, most respectfully, Your obedient servant, Thos. L. Rosser, Brigadier-General. Major H. B. McClellan, A. A. General Stuart's Cavalry Corps. Endorsements. Headquarters cavalry corps A. N. V., April 7th, 1864. Respectfully forwarded. The bold and successful enterprise herein reported furnishes additional proofs of General Rosser's merit as a commander, and adds fresh laurels to that veteran brigade, so signalized for valor already. J. E. B. Stuart, Major-General. Headquarters Army Northern Va., 19th April, 1864. Respectfully forwarded for the information of the War
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
arlestown to Harper's Ferry, were proceeding to invest this position, when the situation suddenly changed into one which would have unnerved a less determined commander, and have demoralized troops of less implicit confidence in their chief. McClellan had been gradually closing in on Richmond, and was only waiting for McDowell's column to swoop down from Fredericksburg in order to make his grand assault. But the movements of Jackson and the rout of Banks so alarmed the authorities at Washin expected, was easily repulsed, and in the afternoon Ewell assumed the offensive and drove the enemy back some distance. But I have already exceeded my limits and must reserve for my next sketch a brief statement of how Shields caught Jackson the next day at Port Republic, of how Fremont and Shields both concluded that they had caught a Tartar, and of how (after resting for a season) the foot cavalry suddenly appeared on the Chickahominy, and assisted in McClellan's famous change of base.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiseences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
as possible, where it had the effect of inducing Mr. Lincoln to order General McDowell to delay his intended advance to McClellan's support, and caused the retreat down the Valley of all the forces opposed to Jackson. But the deception was rendered where they were busily engaged in fortifying against Jackson at the very time when the foot cavalry were thundering on McClellan's flank before Richmond. Our march was so secretly undertaken and so secretly executed that our higher officers, as ved all of the instructions necessary to enable him to carry out his part of the great battle which was to culminate in McClellan's change of base, and galloped back to the head of his column before it was suspected that he had been absent at all. at Mechanicsville. But of these battles, the part borne in them by the Foot cavalry and the masterly retreat made by McClellan in his change of base, I must speak in my next. I have only been able to give in this an imperfect sketch of how we
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
iting a model history, and the Society on making a really valuable contribution to the history of the war. We advise our friends to send $3 to J. R. Osgood & Co., Boston, and secure a copy of this superb book. The Peninsular campaign of General McClellan in 1862. Being volume I of the papers of the Military Historical Society of Massachusetts. One volume, 8vo, with maps, $3. It contains: General McClellan's plans for the campaign of 1861, and the alleged Interferences of the Government wGeneral McClellan's plans for the campaign of 1861, and the alleged Interferences of the Government with them, by John C. Ropes, Esq.; The siege of Yorktown, by Bvt. Brig.-Gen. John C. Palfrey, U. S. A.; The period which elapsed between the siege of Yorktown and the beginning of the seven-days battles, by Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Francis W. Palfrey, U. S. V.; The seven-days battles.--to Malvern Hill, by Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Francis W. Palfrey, U. S. V.; The battle of Malvern Hill, by Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Francis W. Palfrey, U. S. V.; Comments on the Peninsular campaign, by Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Charles A. Whittier, U.
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