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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 20 2 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.14 (search)
over the matters about which I wanted to see him, without losing any more time from my new command than was necessary. The first point which I wished to discuss particularly was about the cooperation of his command with mine when the spring campaign should commence. There were also other and minor points,--minor as compared with the great importance of the question to be decided by sanguinary war,--the restoration to duty of officers who had been relieved from important commands, namely, McClellan, Burnside, and Fremont in the East, and Buell, McCook, Negley, and Crittenden in the West. Some time in the winter of 1863-64: I had been invited by the general-in-chief to give my views of the campaign I thought advisable for the command under me — now Sherman's. General J. E. Johnston was defending Atlanta and the interior of Georgia with an army, the largest part of which was stationed at Dalton, about 38 miles south of Chattanooga. Dalton is at the junction of the railroad from Cl
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Through the Wilderness. (search)
Through the Wilderness. by Alexander S. Webb, Brevet Major-General, U. S. A. In 1861, 1862, and 1863, the Army of the Potomac, under McClellan, Hooker, and Meade, had by constant attrition worn down Lee's command until, in the minds of many officers and men who were actively engaged in the front, there was confidence that Lee would not hold out against our army another year. On April 9th, 1864, General Grant instructed General Meade that Lee's army would be his objective. Meade had with him, according to his report of April 30th, 95,952 enlisted men, 3486 officers, and 274 guns. Hancock's corps contained 26,676 men; Warren's, 24,125 men; Sedgwick's, 22,584 men ; These three corps had been increased by the consolidation with them of the First and Third corps (see p. 93). Besides causing great dissatisfaction throughout the army, this consolidation, in my opinion, was the indirect cause of much of the confusion in the execution of orders, and in the handling of troops durin
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Cold Harbor. (search)
the Potomac stood together once more almost within sight of the spires of Richmond, and on the very ground where, under McClellan, they had defended the passage of the river they were now endeavoring to force. On the 2d of June our confronting lihe had the advantage, of which he freely availed himself, of ordering troops to his assistance, not begging for them as McClellan did in vain. He depleted the defenses of Washington at his pleasure, and of new troops more than the number of men wit its termination at Appomattox. The line of the peninsula and the advance to Cold Harbor and the Chickahominy had been McClellan's second plan. His first had been a movement from Urbana [see Vol. II., p. 163], with the possibility in view of crosof Richmond and its defenses. This plan had been overruled in Washington, and that of the peninsula, also suggested by McClellan, had been approved as a compromise. But the plan of an overland march to Richmond, while protected navigable waters wi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Petersburg and Richmond: December 31st, 1864. (search)
11th Mass. (batt'n), Lieut.-Col. Charles C. Rivers; 7th N. J. (batt'n), Col. Francis Price; 8th No J. (batt'n), Capt. Louis M. Morris; 11th N. J., Lieut.-Col. John Schoonover; 120th N. Y., Maj. Abram L. Lockwood. artillery Brigade, Maj. John G. Hazard: 6th Me., Lieut. William H. Rogers; 10th Mass., Capt. J. Henry Sleeper; M, 1st N. H., Capt. Frederick M. Edgell; 2d N. J. (or B, 1st N. J.), Capt. A. Judson Clark; 3d N. J. (or C, 1st N. J.), Capt. Christian Woerner; G, 1st N. Y., Capt. Samuel A. McClellan; C, 4th N. Y. Heavy, Capt. James H. Wood; L, 4th N. Y. Heavy, Lieut. Richard Kennedy; 11th N. Y., Lieut. George W. Davey; 12th N. Y., Lieut. William S. Bull; F, 1st Pa., Lieut. John F. Campbell; B, 1st R. I., Capt. T. Fred. Brown; K, 4th U. S., Lieut. John W. Roder; C and I, 5th U. S., Lieut. William B. Beck. Fifth Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren. Escort: Detachment 4th Pa. Cav., Capt. Napoleon J. Horrell. Provost Guard. E and F, 5th N. Y., Capt. Paul A. Oliver; 1
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the James River. (search)
Closing operations in the James River. by Professor James Russell Soley, U. S. N. On the 31st of August, 1862, the James River flotilla, under Captain Charles Wilkes, was disbanded, the withdrawal of McClellan from the Peninsula having rendered its further continuance unnecessary. For a long time thereafter the greater part of the river was left in the undisturbed possession of the Confederates, who took the opportunity to fit out a squadron of considerable strength. The nucleus of this squadron was found in the gun-boats which had assisted the Merrimac in Hampton Roads, viz., the Patrick Henry, Beaufort, Raleigh, and Teazer. The Jamestown, which had also been in Tattnall's squadron, was sunk as an obstruction at Drewry's Bluff. Three other gun-boats, the Hampton and Nansemond, which had been built at Norfolk, and the Drewry, were added to the enemy's flotilla in the James. [See map, p. 494.] Little of importance happened on the river in 1863. In the adjoining waters of C
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Appomattox campaign. (search)
ched from Fifth Corps and detached with Ninth Corps), Capt. Charles A. Phillips; 9th Mass. (detached from the Reserve with Ninth Corps), Capt. Richard S. Milton; 14th Mass. (attached to Ninth Corps), Capt. Joseph W. B. Wright; 3d N. J. (or C, 1st N. J.), Capt. Christian Woerner; C, 1st N. Y., Capt. David F. Ritchie; E, 1st N. Y. (attached from Fifth Corps and detached with Ninth Corps), Lieut. George H. Barse; G, 1st N. Y. (attached from Second Corps and detached with Ninth Corps), Capt. Samuel A. McClellan; L, 1st N. Y. (attached from Fifth Corps and detached with Ninth Corps), Lieut. De Witt M. Perine, Capt. George Breck; 12th N. Y. (attached from Second Corps), Capt. Charles A. Clark; H, 1st Ohio (attached from Sixth Corps), Capt. Stephen W. Dorsey; B, 1st Pa. (attached to Ninth Corps), Capt. William McClelland; F, 1st Pa. (attached from Second Corps), Lieut. John F. Campbell; E, 1st R. I. (attached from Sixth Corps), Lieut. Ezra K. Parker; 3d Vt. (attached from Sixth Corps), Capt.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.113 (search)
. They had swung around the circle,--the largest circle ever swung around by an army corps. After resting a few days near Richmond we started for Washington over the battle-scarred route so familiar to the men who had fought under McDowell, McClellan, and subsequently under Grant, as well as to those who had served under Lee. The weather was pleasant and the march full of interest. On some of the fields where great battles had been fought we found the bodies of many Union soldiers lying un to bury the dead, and subsequently a party was sent from Washington to complete the work. We went into camp in the vicinity of Alexandria, my own headquarters being very near the place I had occupied during the first winter of the war, when McClellan was organizing the Army of the Potomac. We were soon informed that the final scene of the war was to be a grand review of all the troops by the President and his Cabinet. All the foreign ministers resident in Washington, the governors of the