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p to Mossy Creek, captured a train, and then run into Jonesboro, one hundred miles distant from Knoxville, with four hundred men, and there took another. A small company of cavalry, under Captain Jones, at this latter place, after firing a volley into the. enemy, made their escape. Two females were wounded by the Yankees in the encounter. The enemy then pushed on to Carter's bridge, where was stationed a small force of infantry and one section of artillery, under the accomplished Captain McClung, and demanded its surrender; when, upon refusal, they retreated toward Knoxville. Having learned the above facts, General Jackson, who was at Bristol with the principal body of his forces, with a regiment of Kentucky cavalry and some other forces that had recently joined him, made a forced march for Jonesboro, at which place he arrived on the morning of the seventh. Here he learned that the enemy was returning in full force by railway, so he promptly threw forward a battalion of cav
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 7: military operations in Missouri, New Mexico, and Eastern Kentucky--capture of Fort Henry. (search)
s immediately ordered to lead the column. He started at midnight, Carroll's Brigade following his. Zollicoffer's Brigade was composed of the Fifteenth Mississippi, and the Tennessee regiments of Colonels Cummings, Battle, and Stanton, marching in the order here named, with four guns commanded by Captain Rutledge, immediately in the rear of the Mississippians. Carroll's troops were composed of the Tennessee regiments of Colonels Newman, Murray, and Powell, with two guns commanded by Captain McClung, marching in the order named. Colonel Wood's Sixteenth Alabama was in reserve. Cavalry battalions in the rear; Colonel Branner on the right, and Colonel McClellan on the left. Independent companies in front of the advance regiments. Following the whole were ambulances, and ammunition and other wagons. Following these as a reserve were the Sixteenth Alabama, Colonel Wood, and Branner's and McClellan's battalions of cavalry. The whole force was between four and five thousand strong.
n. J. M. Hawes commanding.Brig. Gen. B. H. Helm commanding. Battalion, Alabama.9th Arkansas. 31st Alabama.10th Arkansas. 4th Kentucky.6th Mississippi. 5th [9th] Kentucky.1st Missouri. Byrne's battery.Watson Battery. Second Brigade.Fourth Brigade. Brig. Gen. William Preston commanding.Col. W. S. Statham commanding.  15th Mississippi. ----Alabama.22d Mississippi. 3d Kentucky.19th Tennessee. 6th Kentucky.20th Tennessee. 7th Kentucky.28th Tennessee. Cobb's battery.45th Tennessee.  McClung's battery. Army of the West.--Maj. Gen. Earl Van Dorn commanding. First Division. Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones commanding. First Brigade.Second Brigade. Brig. Gen. Albert Rust commandingBrig. Gen. Dabney H. Maury commanding. Carroll's regiment (Arkansas).  Jones' battalion (Arkansas).Adams' battalion (Arkansas). King's regiment (Arkansas).McRae's regiment (Arkansas). Lemoyne's battalion (Arkansas).Garland's regiment (Texas). McCarver's battalion (Arkansas).Moore's regiment (Texas). Sme
ississippi volunteers, Captain Hughes Nineteenth Tennessee volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel Moore; Twentieth Tennessee volunteers, Colonel Smith; Twenty-eighth Tennessee volunteers, Colonel Brown; Forty-fifth Tennessee volunteers, Colonel Searcey; McClung's battery, Captain McClung. General M. L. Smith.--Company of sappers and miners, Captain Winters; Twenty-sixth Louisiana volunteers, Colonel DeClouett; Twenty-fifth Louisiana volunteers, Colonel Thomas; Sixth Mississippi battalion, LieutenantCaptain McClung. General M. L. Smith.--Company of sappers and miners, Captain Winters; Twenty-sixth Louisiana volunteers, Colonel DeClouett; Twenty-fifth Louisiana volunteers, Colonel Thomas; Sixth Mississippi battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel Balfour; Twenty-seventh Louisiana volunteers, Colonel Marks; Third Mississippi volunteers, Colonel Mellon; Seventeenth Louisiana volunteers, Colonel Richardson; Fourth Louisiana volunteers, Colonel Allen; Company I, Thirty-seventh Mississippi volunteers, Captain Randall; First Mississippi Light artillery, Colonel Withers; regiment heavy artillery, Colonel Jackson; Eighth Louisiana battalion, Pinckney; First Louisiana battalion, Major Clinch; Twenty-eighth Mississippi cavalry, Colonel S
igade at Mark's Mills. The other officers were exchanged in 1862, and the regiment was reorganized at Jackson, Miss., 1862, under Col. Ben W. Johnson, Lieut.-Col. P. L. Lee, Maj. W. E. Steward, Adjt. J. E. Baker. . . . The captains on reorganization were: Company A, John Stevenson; Company B, Joseph Daniels; Company C, James Franklin; Company D, John Hubbard; Company E, Ed Wilson; Company F, William Walker; Company G, Albert Reed; Company H, Wilkerson; Company I, L. W. Matthews; Company K, McClung. The regiment after reorganization was sent south to Louisiana to resist Banks, and fought in many minor engagements—Cross Landing, Greenfield, Plum's Store, and with the First Alabama and Thirteenth Mississippi, engaged at Keller's Lane a largely superior force of Federals, which they routed, taking many prisoners and valuable stores. The regiment was called into the fortifications of Port Hudson, when attacked by the army and navy of the United States. Captain Reed, of Company G, was
Bledsoe. The Second brigade, commanded by Brig.-Gen. William H. Carroll, was composed of the Seventeenth Tennessee, Lieutenant-Colonel Miller; Twenty-eighth Tennessee, Col. John P. Murray; Twenty-ninth Tennessee, Col. Samuel Powell; two guns of McClung's battery, Captain McClung; Sixteenth Alabama, Col. W. B. Wood, and the cavalry battalions of Lieutenant-Colonel Brauner and Lieut.-Col. George Mc-Clellan. The movement to the north of the Cumberland was made by General Zollicoffer without theCaptain McClung; Sixteenth Alabama, Col. W. B. Wood, and the cavalry battalions of Lieutenant-Colonel Brauner and Lieut.-Col. George Mc-Clellan. The movement to the north of the Cumberland was made by General Zollicoffer without the approval of General Johnston. In a dispatch to the latter, dated December 10, 1861, Zollicoffer said: I infer from yours that I should not have crossed the river, but it is now too late. My means of recrossing is so limited, I could hardly accomplish it in the face of the enemy. General Crittenden united his two brigades, and after consulting with their commanders, decided to attack the enemy. Soon after daylight on the 19th of January, the advance was made, and after a march of nine mil
re largely Tennessee troops; and these, with the artillery and cavalry from that State, constituted a force too strong and too spirited to march under guard, unless they had been led by the vaunting hero of the battle above the clouds. The Knoxville campaign, under Lieut.-Gen. James Longstreet, was participated in by Bushrod Johnson's brigade; the Fourth, Eighth, Ninth and Tenth Tennessee cavalry under Brig.--Gen. W. Y. C. Humes; Dibrell's cavalry brigade; Freeman's, White's, Rhett's and McClung's batteries, and the First Tennessee cavalry, Col. Onslow Bean. General Johnson, with his own and Gracie's brigade, reached the front of Knoxville on the 27th and 28th of November, 1863. On the 29th he moved to the attack on Fort Loudon in support of the assaulting column under Brigadier-General Humphreys, Gracie on the right. The command approached to within 250 yards of the enemy's fortifications on which the assault was made, and was soon under fire. At this time Gracie was withdrawn
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 95 (search)
the same effect that a stick in the hands of a mischievous boy, near enough to stir up a nest of wasps, would have had: they swarmed out and very soon were ready for us. Moving over to the Staunton pike, we soon learned that Wilson's division and Lowell's brigade had been sent to Staunton and Waynesboroa to destroy the iron railroad bridge at the latter place. General Wickham ordered me to move with my brigade to Waynesboroa and attack, saying General Pegram's brigade would follow me. Captain McClung's company of the First Virginia regiment came from this county-Augusta. I moved up to within half a mile of the enemy's pickets facing down the Valley, the direction they would expect us, and making a detour by a blind road used years before for the hauling of charcoal, passing in and around the foot-hills; this brought me out about a quarter of a mile from the mouth of the tunnel through the mountain, and between it and the railroad bridge, upon which the enemy were at work. Two co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fight at Waynesboroa. (search)
the same effect that a stick in the hands of a mischievous boy, near enough to stir up a nest of wasps, would have had: they swarmed out and very soon were ready for us. Moving over to the Staunton pike, we soon learned that Wilson's division and Lowell's brigade had been sent to Staunton and Waynesboroa to destroy the iron railroad bridge at the latter place. General Wickham ordered me to move with my brigade to Waynesboroa and attack, saying General Pegram's brigade would follow me. Captain McClung's company of the First Virginia regiment came from this county-Augusta. I moved up to within half a mile of the enemy's pickets facing down the Valley, the direction they would expect us, and making a detour by a blind road used years before for the hauling of charcoal, passing in and around the foot-hills; this brought me out about a quarter of a mile from the mouth of the tunnel through the mountain, and between it and the railroad bridge, upon which the enemy were at work. Two co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Major R. C. M. Page, Chief of Confederate States artillery, Department of Southwest Virginia and East Tennessee, from October, 1864, to May, 1865. (search)
, Washington county, Va., by rail, and thence to Brigadier-General Vaughan's camp. Found there McClung's battery, tolerably complete, and remnants of Lynch's and Byrne's batteries. As Vaughan was ao advance into East Tennessee, in accordance with instructions from headquarters, I ordered Captain McClung to report to him with two iron 12-pound howitzers, one iron 6-pounder, one Richmond 3-inch rifle, and two caissons. Present for duty: Captain McClung, First Lieutenant Alexander Allison, Senior Second Lieutenant J. L. Pearcy, Junior Second Lieutenant W. G. Dobson, twelve non-commissioned ordered to report to Colonel Thomas H. Carter in the Shenandoah Valley. October 28th, 1864.—McClung's battery, acting with Vaughan's cavalry brigade in East Tennessee, reported captured, correct.the Richmond 3-inch rifle, none of which had ever been worth hauling about any way. Remnants of McClung's, Barr's and Sawyer's men were merged into Lynch's battery. January 18th, 1865.—Wytheville,
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