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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 174 6 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 142 8 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 129 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 91 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 87 3 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 73 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 59 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 51 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 1 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
but was repulsed at Dalton and driven into East Tennessee, whehce it proceeded west to McMinnville, Murfreesborough, and Franklin, and was finally driven south of the Tennessee. The damage done by this raid was repaired in a few days. During the partial investment of Atlanta, General Rousseau joined General Sherman with a force of cavalry from Decatur, having made a successful raid upon the Atlanta and Montgomery Railroad and its branches near Opelika. Cavalry raids were also made by Generals McCook, Garrard, and Stoneman to cut the remaining railroad communication with Atlanta. The first two were successful; the latter disastrous. General Sherman's movement from Chattanooga to Atlanta was prompt, skillful, and brilliant. The history of his flank movements and battles during that memorable campaign will ever be read with an interest unsurpassed by anything in history. His own report, and those of his subordinate commanders accompanying it, give the details of that most succe
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
combats. July 24, 1864.Skirmish near Cartersville. July 27, 1864.Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard, U. S. Army, assumes command of the Army of the Tennessee. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan, U. S. Army, resumes command of the Fifteenth Army Corps. Maj. Gen. David S. Stanley, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard in command of the Fourth Army Corps. Brig. Gen. Alpheus S. Williams, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker in temporary command of the Twentieth Army Corps. July 27-31, 1864.McCook's raid on the Atlanta and West Point and Macon and Western Railroads, with skirmishes near Campbellton (28th), near Lovejoy's Station (29th), at Clear Creek (30th), and action near Newnan (30th). Garrard's raid to South River, with skirmishes at Snapfinger Creek (27th), Flat Rock Bridge and Lithonia (28th). July 27-Aug. 6, 1864.Stoneman's raid to Macon, with combats at Macon and Clinton (July 30), Hillsborough (July 30-31), Mulberry Creek and Jug Tavern (August 3). July 30, 1864.Maj. Gen.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
n, and General Stoneman with General Schofield. General McCook looked to our rear. Owing to the difficult nathe left, and General Stoneman on the right, and General McCook looking to our rear and communications. Our deble lives, among them those of Generals Harker and. McCook, Colonel Rice and others badly wounded, our aggregad with General McPherson, and Generals Stoneman and McCook watched the river and roads below the railroads. ng an effective force of full 5,000 men, and to General McCook I gave his own and the new cavalry brought by G was in not making the first concentration with Generals McCook and Garrard near Lovejoy's, according to his orders, which is yet unexplained. General McCook in the execution of his part went down the west branch of tsed, and got to Marietta without further loss. General McCook is entitled to much credit for thus saving his tion can build a proud history. McPherson, Harker, McCook, and others dear to us all, are now the binding lin
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 8 (search)
artillery was organized, but suitable mounted batteries, equipped as lightly as possible, were selected for service with the cavalry, and were assigned to, and served through the campaign with, the divisions of Stoneman, Kilpatrick, Garrard, and McCook. The cavalry commanders, and the army chiefs of artillery give these batteries, in their several reports, a high reputation for endurance and dash, praise which entitles them to the more credit since their organization and equipment was not altonecessarily were in unusually exposed positions, and not unfrequently upon the actual skirmish line, the guns were always served with steadiness and effect, and in no instance, except in the battle of July 22 and the cavalry raids of Stoneman and McCook, on which occasions there were special exculpatory reasons, were guns abandoned or the enemy suffered to make captures. A manifest improvement was observable throughout in the use and selection of projectiles and in the judicious expenditure of
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 13 (search)
retained. We have lost the valuable services of several officers killed in battle during the campaign, viz: Capt. Peter Simonson, Fifth Indiana Battery; Capt. S. M. McDowell, Company B, Independent Pennsylvania Artillery; Capt. William Wheeler, Thirteenth New York Battery; First Lieut. O. H. P. Ayres, Sixth Ohio Battery; Second Lieut. F. Henchen, Company I, First New York Artillery. Our loss in guns was four 3-inch Rodmans-two belonging to the Eighteenth Indiana Battery, lost on General McCook's raid, July 30, 1864; two of the Chicago Board of Trade Battery, lost on General Kilpatrick's raid, August 20, 1864. I would here take the opportunity to mention the effective service of the batteries serving with the cavalry command-Tenth Wisconsin Battery, Capt. Y. V. Beebe; Eighteenth Indiana Battery, First Lieut. W. B. Rippetoe, and the Chicago Board of Trade Battery, First Lieut. G. I. Robinson, commanding-during the entire campaign. In every instance where these batteries wer
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
of Maye Major-General Thomas having already reached Ringgold with the rest of the Army of the Cumberland, a junction was thus substantially formed with it. A very little skirmishing occurred to the east of Catoosa Springs with a detachment of General McCook's cavalry that had covered my left flank during the march from Cleveland. Not feeling sure as to the intention or strength of the enemy, my command took up a strong position covering its own approaches and those to Ringgold. Here the corrt of the enemy having left, and immediately ordered pursuit. The corps moved at once to Dalton and came upon the enemy's rear guard of cavalry there. We pushed forward toward Resaca, General Stoneman with his cavalry pursuing the direct route, McCook's cavalry on a road near the base of Rocky Face, and my corps marching by an intermediate road. We skirmished with the enemy during the day, and encamped at dark about eight miles south of Dalton. Soon after we opened communication with the re
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
Army, commanding First Division, of operations May 3-July 26. Hdqrs. Firt Division, Fourth Army Corps, 1864. I have the honor to state that at 12 m. on the 3d day of May the First Division, under my command, marched from its camp at Blue Springs, under orders to move to Catoosa Springs. The division took the main road to Dalton, and encamped the same night one mile south of Red Clay. Marching early the next morning, we reached Catoosa Springs at noon, near Dr. Lee's house. General McCook's cavalry, which was in advance of the infantry, exchanged shots with the rebel pickets, who ran away in the direction of Tunnel Hill. We remained in camp the 5th and 6th, and on the morning of the?th marched for Tunnel Hill, this division leading. After passing Dr. Lee's house the main road leading down the base of Rocky Face was taken. Skirmishers were deployed, and the enemy's skirmishers were soon encountered. We found the road obstructed by fallen trees, but all difficulties wer
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 24 (search)
obtained leave of absence on account of ill health, took his departure for the rear, and I, being senior officer present, assumed command of the brigade. On that date the brigade lay on the extreme right of the Fourth Corps, connecting its right flank with General Jeff. C. Davis' division, of the Fourteenth Corps, and its left with the Third Brigade of this division. The front line was pushed up to within seventyfive yards of the enemy's works, at the point where the brigades of Harker and McCook made the assault on the 27th of June. This line was held by two regiments of my command, and was subjected to an incessant and fatally accurate fire from the enemy. The remaining regiments of the brigade were camped at a short distance in rear and were held to relieve the regiments on the front line, which was done at 8 p. m. each day. The position of the front line remained unchanged until the morning of July 3, when the skirmishers of the Fortieth Ohio and Fifty-first Ohio being advanced
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 56 (search)
etly behind works. July 3, the enemy having evacuated his works during the night, the One hundred and twenty-fifth joined in the pursuit at 6 a. m. and bivouacked at five miles below Marietta near the railroad, confronting the enemy. July 4, changed position and fortified; the enemy withdrew during the night. July 5, marched at 7 a. m. and bivouacked at night near Vining's Station. July 6, 7, and 8, rested in bivouac, men washing, &c. July 9, 10, and 11, moved with the division to support McCook's cavalry, which had effected a crossing of the Chattahcochee River at Roswell, twelve miles above Vining's. July 12, 13, and 14, returned to Vining's Station, crossed the Chattahoochee River at Powers' Ferry, and constructed breast-works at a point two miles farther south. July 15, 16, and 17, remained quietly in camp; no enemy appeared in our immediate front. July 18, the entire command moved at 5 a. m.; the One hundred and twenty-fifth was deployed as skirmishers, and was supported by t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 73 (search)
front, which, owing to the intense darkness, was accomplished with much difficulty. On the morning of the 31st of May orders were given to intrench the position. While engaged in this the enemy attempted to charge the line. He was met by Major Claggett, of the Seventeenth Kentucky Volunteers, commanding the skirmish line, and successfully repulsed. The brigade remained in the above position till the morning of the 4th of June, when orders were received to move to the right, to relieve McCook's brigade, of Davis' division, Fourteenth Army Corps. The enemy having abandoned his position on the 5th, on the 6th day of June the brigade marched in the direction of Acworth, and remained in bivouac until the 10th of June. The time of the non-veterans of the Thirteenth Regiment Ohio Volunteers having nearly expired, they were sent to the rear to be mustered out. The veterans and those who had to serve an unexpired term were consolidated into four companies, and the battalion placed unde
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