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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 44 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 14 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 1 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. (search)
, under General Winslow, was ordered to march by the most direct route to Atlanta, a regiment under Colonel Eggleston having been sent by rail to that place immediately after the receipt of the telegram just mentioned from General Sherman. General E. M. McCook, with a detachment of seven hundred men, was directed to proceed by rail to. Albany, Georgia, and march thence by the most direct route to Tallahassee, Florida, while General Croxton, with the remainder of this division, was held at Macon, the Southwestern Railroad, and in Western and Southwestern Georgia. Detachments of the Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry occupied Cuthbert, Eufaula, Columbus and Bainbridge, and kept a vigilant watch over the lower Flint and Chattahoochee, while General McCook, with a detachment of his division at Albany, and seven hundred men between there and Tallahassee, Florida, was scouting the country to the north and eastward. We also had rail and telegraphic communication from my headquarters at Macon with
light, and this is the most sure and certain method of putting a stop to the marauding expeditions that are from time to time sent out through the country. In Colonel Blythe's district or field of operations it has proved most efficacious in holding the enemy at bay, and we hope to see the plan put more extensively in practice. A big scare, occasioned by a brisk fire from a chapparal, is often more potent than would be half a dozen regiments of organized troops in the field. To-night the bombardment of the rebel works at Port Hudson was renewed, and continued for an hour, but the rebels made no reply. The Second Indiana cavalry, under the command of Colonel E. M. McCook, made a scout near Stone River, Tenn., visiting the haunt of every guerrilla in that vicinity. They succeeded in capturing eight rebels, beside twenty horses belonging to the guerrilla band.--The schooner Sea Lion, from Mobile to Havana, with a cargo of cotton, was captured by the National frigate Colorado.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Union cavalry in the Hood campaign. (search)
in the campaign against Hood and in the final overthrow of the rebellion. Meanwhile the work went on of collecting, remounting, and reequipping these troops and disposing them so as to cover the operations of the Federal infantry and to develop the plans and movements of Hood. On the 30th of October, 1864, Hood's army crossed the Tennessee on its northward march, three miles below Bainbridge, and this circumstance was promptly detected by General Croxton, commanding the First Brigade of McCook's division, lately remounted at Louisville, and was reported at once to General Thomas, who had just taken post at Nashville. Without waiting for orders Croxton then made haste to collect his brigade and lead it against the enemy; but as he could not muster over a thousand troopers for duty, he failed to check the rebel advance and was soon forced to take up a position of observation behind Shoal Creek, where he was joined on the 5th of November by General Hatch, with the Fifth Division, wh
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 4: campaign of the Army of the Cumberland from Murfreesboro'to Chattanooga. (search)
his way to Van Cleve's side, to report to General Thomas early in the morning. McCook was ordered to replace Negley's troops by one of his own divisions, and to closrittenden was ordered to hold two of his divisions in reserve, ready to support McCook or Thomas, as circumstances might require. These orders were issued at an earlected to close up to Reynolds on the right center, and Davis to close on Wood. McCook, commanding on that wing, was ordered to close down on the left with all possib's. right. This left a gap, which Longstreet quickly saw, and before Davis, by McCook's order, could fill it with three light brigades, he thrust Hood into it. The lThis turbulent and resistless tide carried along with it Rosecrans, Crittenden, McCook, and other commanders, while Sheridan and Davis, who were driven over to the Dr road, rallying their shattered divisions, re-formed them by the way, and, with McCook, halted and changed front at Rossville, with a determination to defend the pass
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
ll party of infantry (which had come up from a working party in General McCook's division, and deployed in the woods to assist our cavalry) hangaged in or connected with a skirmish which took place in front of McCook's and Wood's divisions on the 9th instant. The court finds as fn the 9th of the present month our line of outposts in front of General McCook's division were assailed by the enemy to the number of about 25 General Buell pleasure to say that the Second Indiana Cavalry, Colonel McCook, was found to have taken no part in the affair; and that if my ects me to call. your attention to the following abstract from Colonel McCook's letter of the 10th instant: None of my men on yesterday oe the impropriety of this language, and are desired to admonish Colonel McCook of the same, and to say that in thus passing it over the general must make known to Colonel McCook that a recurrence of this impropriety would render it necessary to take some more decided official notice
ne regiment cavalry; three companies of engineers. Second Division, Brigadier-General McCook commanding: Eleven regiments volunteers and three battalions (nineteens at the burnt house, in front of his lines, the other brigade in the trenches; McCook, with two brigades and one in reserve, mainly on the right of the Corinth road As soon as we are in position I shall send forward a force mainly in front of McCook and Nelson to feel the enemy and discover the ground. The density of the woods and are throwing up such intrenchments as the circumstances and time admit of. McCook's division is on the ridge beyond Bridge Creek, and he reports that his skirmisfault in regard to Bridge Creek. I have thought it best not to withdraw any of McCook's troops, and have ordered them to intrench to-night. If attacked in the mornis not public for all who wished it. It has also been reported to me that General McCook felt aggrieved that in telegraphing to the Secretary of War the opening of
laden with supplies, then in Sequatchie valley, near Anderson's Cross-roads, which he captured Oct. 2. and burned; being attacked, directly afterward, by Col. E. M. McCook, who, with three regiments of cavalry, had been ordered from Bridgeport to pursue him. McCook had the better of the fight; but darkness closed it; and the enMcCook had the better of the fight; but darkness closed it; and the enemy moved off during the night, while McCook had no orders to pursue him. Wheeler next struck McMinnville, in the heart of Tennessee, which, with 600 men, a train of wagons, and one of cars, was surrendered to him without a struggle, and where he burned a large quantity of supplies. But here he was overhauled by Gen. Geo. CrooMcCook had no orders to pursue him. Wheeler next struck McMinnville, in the heart of Tennessee, which, with 600 men, a train of wagons, and one of cars, was surrendered to him without a struggle, and where he burned a large quantity of supplies. But here he was overhauled by Gen. Geo. Crook, who, with another cavalry division, 2,000 strong, had started from Washington, Tenn., and had for some hours been pursuing and fighting Wharton, and by whose order Col. Long, with the 2d Kentucky, charged the rear of the now flying foe with spirit and effect. Wheeler's force being superior, he halted and fought dismounted till
sions, and Major-General J. H. Wilson was assigned to its command. At the battle of Nashville, four of these divisions — McCook's, Hatch's, Johnson's and Knipe's — were present. After the defeat and dismemberment of Hood's Army, Wilson entered Alabtroopers in March, 1865, and there fought the closing battles of the war. His four divisions were there commanded by Generals McCook, Hatch, Long and Upton. Although the last infantry engagement of the war occurred April 9, 1865, Wilson's Corps fou, the cavalry attached to his army was divided into four columns, commanded by Generals Stoneman, Kilpatrick, Garrard and McCook (E. M.). Kilpatrick's Division afterwards accompanied that part of Sherman's Army which marched through Georgia to the Set Chickamauga, the cavalry forces were commanded by General Robert B. Mitchell, and comprised two divisions under Generals E. M. McCook and George Crook. The casualties in the Cavalry Corps at that battle aggregated 32 killed, 136 wounded, and 300
ew cavalry, and the result was the capture of all in less than ten days time by the same forces opposed to us. The First brigade, commanded by the brave Colonel E. M. McCook, of the Second Indiana, were, after frequent successful skirmishes with Bragg's rear-guard, detailed to guard the immense wagon-train of Buell's army throucapture or destroy it if possible. Instead, therefore, of bringing it forward upon the road on which the army came, he sent it twelve miles further west; and had McCook's brigade of cavalry to scout the road continually from Elizabethtown to Munfordville, covering the vast train, as it passed safely through Litchfield on to LouisNew-Haven, watching ou<*>movements. Colonel Kennett, the ever vigilant cavalry division commander, determined if possible to surprise and capture the force. Colonel McCook, always ready for any daring movement, was also anxious for the adventure, and Colonel Wolford, though almost past riding from his wound, was ready and eager
e advantage. During the 8th and 9th of May, these operations were continued, the Federals making but little impression on the Confederate stronghold. Meanwhile, on the Dalton road there was a sharp cavalry fight, the Federal commander, General E. M. McCook, having encountered General Wheeler. McCook's advance brigade under Colonel La Grange was defeated and La Grange was made prisoner. Sherman's chief object in these demonstrations, it will be seen, was so to engage Johnston as to prevenMcCook's advance brigade under Colonel La Grange was defeated and La Grange was made prisoner. Sherman's chief object in these demonstrations, it will be seen, was so to engage Johnston as to prevent his intercepting McPherson in the latter's movement upon Resaca. In this Sherman was successful, and by the 11th he was giving his whole energy to moving the remainder of his forces by the Resaca. The chips are still bright and the earth fresh turned, in the foreground where are the Confederate earthworks such as General Joseph E. Johnston had caused to be thrown up by the Negro laborers all along his line of possible retreat. McPherson, sent by Sherman to strike the railroad in Jo
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