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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 7: military operations in Missouri, New Mexico, and Eastern Kentucky--capture of Fort Henry. (search)
Fourth Kentucky. He immediately ordered up the Tennessee brigade and a section of artillery, and sent orders for Colonel R. L. McCook to advance with his two regiments (Ninth Ohio, Major Kaemmerling, and Second Minnesota, Colonel H. P. Van Cleve) to the support of the vanguard. The battle was opened at about six o'clock by the Kentucky and Ohio regiments, and Captain Kinney's Battery, stationed on the edge of the field, to the left of the Fourth Kentucky. It was becoming very warm when McCook's reserves came up to the support of the Nationals. Then the Confederates Map of the battle of Mill Spring. References.--the figures 1, 2, 8, 4, 5, and 6, refer to the first and succeeding positions of the Tenth Indiana regiment in the battle; 8, denotes the Second position of the Fourth Kentucky; 9, the Second position of the Second Minnesota; 10, the third position of the same; and 11, the Second position of the Ninth Ohio. opened a most galling fire upon the little line, which made
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
ntly endeavoring to draw us farther into the woods. By this time we gained a position on the opposite side of a small creek beyond Widow Serratt's house, in the edge of the woods in which the enemy were. Here I sent forward Asst. Adjt. Gen. Wickliffe Cooper, of my staff, to ascertain, if possible, the position of the enemy in front of our right wing. He returned and reported, as did Captain Smith, the enemy in force drawn up in line to receive us. Seeing Captain Loder's battery, of General R. L. McCook's brigade, some quarter of a mile distant, in a commanding position, from which he could secure an enfilading fire upon the enemy's lines, I sent Asst. Adjt. Gen. Wickliffe Cooper to request him to open upon them, which he did with great effect, completely silencing the enemy's fire on the right wing. Not knowing the nature of the grounds now occupied by my command and from which we had driven the enemy, and having no orders to proceed farther than the point already gained, I held my
yond their range. Seeing the predicament, Colonel McCook instantly started a man back, asking that re coming up to the enemy's pickets. Meantime McCook's skirmishers had thoroughly explored their teman brigade as this announcement was made! Col. McCook, wild with delight, dashed up and down the gade was therefore divided. Four companies of McCook's own regiment, the Ninth, were sent far up onls from the cliffs on the opposite shore. Colonel McCook brought up a small detachment from the Ninot of the hill, to guard the cross-road, while McCook and Scammon were moving their columns toward tening the men by his fearlessness. Meantime McCook's brigade of Germans had formed in line of bathe magnificent reception of the order. Colonel R. L. McCook, acting brigadier, in his citizen's dred Dutchmen again yelled themselves hoarse, and McCook spurred onward to the front to reconnoitre hisas not permitted to storm, but the Ninth Ohio, McCook's own regiment, and Colonel Moore's Twenty-eig[7 more...]
my's camp. The Ninth Ohio and Second Minnesota (part of Col. McCook's brigade) encamped three fourths of a mile to the rightade to advance on the enemy's right, and sent orders for Col. McCook to advance, with his two regiments, (the Ninth Ohio and noticed by them. I regret to have to report that Colonel R. L. McCook, commanding the Third brigade, and his Aid, Lieut. eral Crittenden. A. L. Cunningham, A. A. General. Colonel McCook's report. headquarters Third brigade, First divisf the killed and wounded. I am, respectfully, yours, R. L. Mccook, Commanding Third Brigade, First Division. Martin Brune left of the Fourth Kentucky regiment, and a portion of Col. McCook's brigade, which had arrived, engaging the enemy on my rort to repulse our troops. In the mean time the gallant Col. McCook, with his invincible Ninth Ohio regiment, came to our su I came very near omitting, deserves especial praise. Colonel McCook rushed his men up just about the time the Tenth Indian
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battle of Murfreesboro, or battle of Stone River, (search)
eesboro. of the Cumberland, moved southward to attack Bragg below Nashville. Rosecrans was assisted by Generals Thomas, McCook. Crittenden, Rousseau, Palmer, Sheridan, J. C. Davis, Wood, Van Cleve, Hazen, Negley, Matthews, and others; and Bragg hadoth armies prepared for battle. Rosecrans had Crittenden on the left, resting on Stone River, Thomas in the centre, and McCook on the right. The troops breakfasted at dawn, and before sunrise Van Cleve—who was to be supported by Wood—crossed the red troops, under Hardee, on his left in the dim morning twilight, and four brigades under Cleburne charged furiously upon McCook's extreme right before Van Cleve had moved. The divisions of Cheatham and McCown struck near the centre, and at both poillich and Kirk, pressing them back in confusion and capturing two batteries. With equal vigor the Confederates fell upon McCook's left, composed of the divisions of Sheridan and Davis, striking them in the flank. After a very severe struggle these
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Perryville, battle of. (search)
ged in three corps, commanded respectively by Generals Gilbert, Crittenden, and McCook. Gen. George H. Thomas, Buell's second in command, had charge of the right winxpecting a battle in the morning, he sent for the flank corps of Crittenden and McCook to close up on his right, and, if possible, surround the Confederates. There w, when the Confederates were repulsed and driven back by troops under Col. D. McCook, of Sheridan's division, with Barnett's battery, some Michigan cavalry, and a Mhing, being well masked, and Cheatham's division fell suddenly and heavily upon McCook's flank with horrid yells, when the raw and outnumbered troops of General Terreuff beyond. Meanwhile, Colonel Gooding's brigade had been sent to the aid of McCook, and fought with great persistence for two hours against odds, losing fully oneer. General Buell did not know the magnitude of the battle until 4 P. M., when McCook sent a request for reinforcements. They were promptly sent. The conflict ende
H. W. Benham Brigadier General  Benham's Brigade, McCook's advance Brigade, Army of Occupation, West Virginia, Department of the Ohio
J. D. Cox Brigadier General  Kanawha Division, Ninth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier General  Kanawha Brigade, McCook's advance Brigade, Army of Occupation, West Virginia, Department of the Ohio Brigadier GeneralMarch 11, 1862, to Aug. 15, 1862. District of the Kanawha., Mountain Department Brigadier GeneralOct. 11, 1861, to March 11, 1862. District of the Kanawha., Department of Western Virginia Brigadier GeneralSept. 14, 1862, to Oct. 8, 1862. Ninth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Major GeneralFeb. 25, 1865, to March 31, 1865. Provisional Corps, Department of North Carolina. Major GeneralFeb. 9, 1865, to Feb. 25, 1865. 3d Division, Twenty-Third Army Corps., Department of North Carolina. Major GeneralJune 17, 1865, to June 27, 1865. Department of North Carolina. Major GeneralMarch 31, 1865, to June 17, 1865. Twenty-Third Army Corps., Department of North
R. L. McCook Col. 9th Ohio Infantry  McCook's advance Brigade, Army of Occupation, West Virginia, Department of the Ohio Col. 9th Ohio Infantry  McCook's Brigade, McCook's advance Brigade, Army of Occupation, West Virginia, Department of thMcCook's advance Brigade, Army of Occupation, West Virginia, Department of the Ohio Col. 9th Ohio Infantry  McCook's Brigade, McCook's advance Brigade, Army of Occupation, West Virginia, Department of the Ohio Col. 9th Ohio InfantryOct., 1861, to Nov., 1861. 2d Brigade, District of the Kanawha., Department of Western Virginia io Col. 9th Ohio Infantry  McCook's Brigade, McCook's advance Brigade, Army of Occupation, West Virginia, Department of the Ohio Col. 9th Ohio InfantryOct., 1861, to Nov., 1861. 2d Brigade, District of the Kanawha., Department of Western Virginia io Col. 9th Ohio Infantry  McCook's Brigade, McCook's advance Brigade, Army of Occupation, West Virginia, Department of the Ohio Col. 9th Ohio InfantryOct., 1861, to Nov., 1861. 2d Brigade, District of the Kanawha., Department of Weste
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Minnesota Volunteers. (search)
8, H July 15, I July 20, and K August 23, 1861. Companies A and F sent to Fort Ripley on the Upper Mississippi, B and C to Fort Abercrombie on the Upper Red River, and D and E to Fort Ridgly on the Upper Minnesota River, and garrison duty at these points till September 20, 1861. Regiment concentrated at Fort Snelling and left State for Louisville, Ky., October 14, arriving there October 22. Moved to Lebanon Junction, Ky., October 22, and duty there till December 8. Attached to R. L. McCook's Brigade, Army of the Ohio, to December, 1861. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, Army of the Ohio, to September, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Ohio, to November, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, Center 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to January, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 14th Army Corps, to October, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 14th Army Corps, to June, 1865. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 14th Army Corps, to July, 1865. Servic
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