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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 5 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McCook, Robert Latimer 1827- (search)
McCook, Robert Latimer 1827- Military officer; born in New Lisbon, O., Dec. 28, 1827; another son of Major McCook; studied law and practised in Cincinnati. In 1861 he was commissioned colonel of the 9th Ohio Regiment, which he had organized. He first served in the West Virginia campaign under McClellan; later was transferred with his brigade to the Army of the Ohio, fought in the battle of Mill Spring, Ky., Jan. 19, 1862, where he was severely wounded; and in March, 1862, was promoted briMajor McCook; studied law and practised in Cincinnati. In 1861 he was commissioned colonel of the 9th Ohio Regiment, which he had organized. He first served in the West Virginia campaign under McClellan; later was transferred with his brigade to the Army of the Ohio, fought in the battle of Mill Spring, Ky., Jan. 19, 1862, where he was severely wounded; and in March, 1862, was promoted brigadier-general of volunteers. Having rejoined his brigade before his wound had healed, he was murdered by guerillas while lying in an ambulance near Salem, Ala., Aug. 6, 1862.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mill spring, battle of (search)
ivided his forces, giving a smaller number to the command of General Schoepf, and leading the remainder himself. When he was within 10 miles of the Confederate camp the insurgents came out to meet him. At early dawn (Jan. 19) the Confederates, 5.000 strong, led by Zollicoffer, met the Union pickets—Woolford's cavalry. A severe battle was soon afterwards begun on the side of the Nationals by the Kentucky and Ohio regiments and Captain Kinney's battery. It was becoming very warm, when Col. R. L. McCook came up with Ohio and Minnesota troops, also a Tennessee brigade and a section of artillery. For a time it was doubtful which side would prevail. They were hotly contesting the possession of a commanding hill when Zollicoffer was killed at the head of his column. General Crittenden immediately took his place, and the struggle for the hill continued about two hours. A galling fire from Minnesota troops and a charge of Ohio troops with bayonets compelled the Confederates to give way a