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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 73 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 45 3 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 39 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 28 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 12, 1863., [Electronic resource] 26 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 25 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 22 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 5, 1862., [Electronic resource] 22 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for McCook or search for McCook in all documents.

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s to go on and collect force and material at the two points already chosen, viz., Dick Robinson and Elizabethtown. General George H. Thomas still continued to command the former, and on the 12th of October I dispatched Brigadier-General A. McD. McCook to command the latter, which had been moved forward to Nolin Creek, fifty-two miles out of Louisville, toward Bowling Green .... I continued to strengthen the two corps forward and their routes of supply; all the time expecting that Sidney Johnston, who was a real general, and who had as correct information of our situation as I had, would unite his force with Zollicoffer, and fall on Thomas at Dick Robinson, or McCook at Nolin. Had he done so in October, 1861, he could have walked into Louisville, and the vital part of the population would have hailed him as a deliverer. Why he did not, was to me a mystery then and is now; for I know that he saw the move, and that his wagons loaded up at one time for a start toward Frankfort, pas
Appendix B. General Sherman (vol. i., pp. 206-208) undertakes to give a statement of his strength, about the 3d or 4th of November. He states that General McCook had at Nolin four brigades, consisting of fourteen regiments of volunteers and some regulars, besides artillery — a force 13,000 strong. General Sherman also furnishes a tabulated list of the regiments under his command, which must have been compiled from imperfect sources. He mentions eleven regiments in easy supporting distance of McCook, and assigns seven to Thomas at Dick Robinson, with three more near by, besides seven others at different points. This makes forty-two regiments. Nelson's command, elsewhere mentioned as containing five regiments, of which three contained 2,650 men, is probably intentionally excluded from this table. But the list contains no mention of a number of Kentucky regiments then actually or nearly completed, some of which were then doing service, such as those commanded by Garrard, Pope,
bat was upon him; and, charging with half a dozen comrades in advance, he rushed upon the squads, or nests, as he called them, who were rallying by fours, using his revolver with deadly effect. Bursting upon one of these nests, he killed two Germans, when he was himself slain by a ball through the brain. A companion instantly avenged his death. The Federals fled to the shelter of their guns, and the Texans bore the dead body of their chief from the field. Thus fell a fearless leader. McCook now began to send over troops to the support of Von Trebra; and, after some further skirmishing and artillery-practice, the firing ceased on both sides. The opponents remained awhile in observation; when Hindman, having accomplished the chief purposes of his demonstration, and finding that nothing more was to be done without drawing upon himself the whole weight of the Federal force, which he did not desire, slowly withdrew without being followed. His loss was four killed and ten wounded,
im off from his bridge, while Schoepf attacked him in front. He adds: The result should be at least a severe blow to him, or a hasty flight across the river. But, to effect the former, the movement should be made rapidly and secretly, and the blow should be vigorous and decided. There should be no delay after your arrival. On December 31st General Thomas started from Lebanon. His column consisted of eight and a half regiments; namely, Manson's brigade of four regiments, three of McCook's regiments, Wolford's cavalry, a battalion of Michigan engineers, and three batteries of artillery. Rains, high water, and bad roads, impeded their progress; so that it was the 17th of January before they reached Logan's Cross Roads, ten miles from Zollicoffer's intrenched camp. The particulars of Thomas's movements are from his official reports, and from Van Horne's Army of the Cumberland. Here Thomas took position to await four of his regiments that had not come up. To secure himsel
ment almost as promptly that way as by water, and I knew that it would bring my army upon the field of future operations in better condition. I commenced my march from Nashville on the 15th of March, with a rapid movement of cavalry, followed by McCook's division, to seize the bridges which were yet in possession of the enemy. The latter, however, succeeded in destroying the bridge over Duck River, at Columbia, forty miles distant, and another a few miles farther north. At that time our armie taken up in concerting a combined movement. It was the advance of Buell that now hastened General Johnston's resolution to attack: The First, Second, Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Divisions, commanded respectively by Brigadier-Generals Thomas, McCook, Nelson, Crittenden, and Wood, with a contingent force of cavalry, in all 37,000 effective men, constituted the main army, which, under the personal command of General Buell, was to join General Halleck in the projected movement against the enemy
ot across the river, and, by daylight, that of McCook began to arrive. Nelson took position on the to him; and then McCook. The interval between McCook and Wallace was occupied by such commands of Gen aligned his division on Nelson's right; and McCook, whose division was beginning to arrive, took row space. Between eight and nine o'clock, McCook's leading brigade, under Rousseau, went in on s he was severely wounded in the shoulder. McCook's troops deserve the more credit for their perght in the streets of Savannah without sleep. McCook says: At Pittsburg Landing the head of mclose of the battle, saw, from his position on McCook's right, the latter part of his contest in fro It was only when the right was withdrawn, and McCook was thus allowed to press their flank, that thpril 5th. In this day's contest the troops of McCook's division had especially signalized themselveday night by the divisions of Generals Nelson, McCook, Crittenden, and Thomas, of Major-General Buel[2 more...]