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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 149 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 99 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 81 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 54 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 29 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 14, 1862., [Electronic resource] 9 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 9 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Robert L. McCook or search for Robert L. McCook in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 5 document sections:

, in the following order: the First Regiment of Ohio Volunteers, Col. McCook; the Second Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Mason; the Second New York State Mder to extend my line still further to the left, sending forward Col. McCook's regiment to feel the battery of the enemy, which was ascertainng him with my two other regiments. This was immediately done. Col. McCook advanced in that direction along the road, which we found to be g the head of this narrow road, where it opened upon the stream, Col. McCook found the battery to be a strong earthwork immediately opposite, Lieut.Col. Mason's regiment filing also to the left. Receiving Col. McCook's report of the battery, and that it would be impossible to turn centre of the front, near the turnpike. Here I was informed by Col. McCook that you had crossed the run above, with other portions of our dus engaged I brought up, and placed in the road towards the bridge, McCook's and Tompkins's regiments, detailing also, and sending forward to
he enemy appeared upon the left flank, between us and our way of retreat. Why they failed, having once secured it, to pursue this enormous advantage, it is impossible to conjecture. I am inclined to believe that the coolness and precision of Col. McCook of the 1st Ohio regiment saved us from this disaster. It is certain Col. McCook displayed a firm resistance to the charge which menaced him, and that the enemy wavered, and then withdrew. But, at this time, the first proofs of the panic whicCol. McCook displayed a firm resistance to the charge which menaced him, and that the enemy wavered, and then withdrew. But, at this time, the first proofs of the panic which had stricken the army were disclosed. From the distant hills, our troops, disorganized, scattered, pallid with a terror which had no just cause, came pouring in among us, trampling down some, and spreading the contagion of their fear among all. It was even then a whirlwind which nothing could resist. The most reluctant of the officers were forced from the valley up the hill, in spite of themselves. Whoever had stood would have been trodden under foot by his own men. Near the top of the hil
d doubtless in the woods. The citizens here say that there were nearly 3,000 of them. One of the regiments was on its way to Rich Mountain to reinforce the forts, and within three miles of its destination, when they heard the guns at the battle, and, soon after the news of the rout, wheeled about and started for Staunton. Gen. McClellan feared that they might make a stand in the Cheat Mountain Gap — but their haste would not permit. Gen. Garnett, with six thousand men, is also on what Col. McCook calls a clean trot for Richmond. He is in the mountains northeast of Beverly, and Gen. Morris is after him; and unless he throws away all his guns, and heavy incumbrances, and is nimble on foot,will surely take him. Glorious, isn't it! With the exception of a small force near Charlestown, on the Kanawha River, Gen. McClellan has swept the rebels out of all that part of Virginia which belongs to his military district. The rebellion can never organize itself again in this region. Gov. P
her severely scratched. As I said, Major Sykes, with his Third, Second, and Eighth Infantry, in all but eight companies, and they decimated, conducted the retreat. Three of his officers had been wounded, and one killed or captured. Several of them were detached, endeavoring to rally the volunteers in front, and have them march off in some sort of order, so as to protect themselves against the enemy's cavalry, known to be in rapid pursuit. On this duty, I recognized his special aid, Lieutenant McCook, of our State, I believe, and another infantry officer, who was also mounted. The road by which the retreat was conducted, the same as that by which we advanced, had been, I think, discovered by the rebels a day or two since. The engineers, in reconnoitring the enemy's position, had been accompanied by a body of troops, who caused such a dust to rise from the road as to make their march easily observable from the heights at Manassas. Retreating by this route, no difficulty occurred
h Indiana, and Third Ohio regiments, and Burdsell's Cavalry and Loomis's Battery, to which will also be attached the Depot of Beverly, consisting of the Sixth Ohio, detachments of the First and Second Virginia regiments, and Bracken's Cavalry. 3. The Second Brigade will consist of the Seventh, Tenth, Thirteenth, Seventeenth Ohio, Mack's Battery, and Chicago Cavalry. 4. The Third Brigade will consist of the Ninth and Fourth Ohio, and Howe's Battery, and continue under command of Col. Robert L. McCook, until further orders. 5. The Fourth, consisting of the First and Second Kentucky, Eleventh and Twelfth Ohio regiments, United States Volunteer Infantry, the Nineteenth, Twenty-first, and portions of the Eighteenth and Twenty-second Ohio Volunteer Militia, the Ironton Cavalry, Captain George, and such others as may hereafter be attached, will be called the Brigade of the Kanawha, and will be commanded by Brig.-Gen. Cox, United States Volunteer Infantry. 6. The Brigadier-General