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pestilence and famine, than to hear gentlemen talk of secession. To break up! to break up this great Government! to dismember this great country! to astonish Europe with an act of folly such as Europe, for two centuries, has never beheld in any Government! No, sir! no, sir! There will be no secession. Gentlemen are not serious when they talk of secession. The Supreme Court, too, speaking through each of its great chiefs, Marshall and Taney, repels the doctrine. In the case of McCulloch and Maryland, the first of these, as the organ of the whole Court, rejected it in clear terms. The very foundation, the only one on which it can for a moment stand, is, that the Constitution is a compact, and not in the usual and sovereign sense of the word, a government. Let me read you how he disposed of this: In discussing this question, (the question of compact,) the counsel for the State of Maryland have deemed it of some importance, in the construction of the Constitution, to
e the field. By a speedy and simultaneous assault on our foes, we can, like a hurricane, scatter them to the winds; while tardy action, like the gentle South wind, will only meet with Northern frosts, and advance and recede, and like the seasons, will be like the history of the war, and will last forever. Come now, strike while the iron is hot! Our enemies are whipped in Virginia. They have been whipped in Missouri. General Hardee advances in the centre, Gen. Pillow on the right, and Gen. McCulloch on the left, with 20,000 brave Southern hearts to our aid. So leave your ploughs in the furrow, and your oxen in the yoke, and rush like a tornado upon our invaders and foes, to sweep them from the face of the earth, or force them from the soil of our State! Brave sons of the Ninth District, come and join us! We have plenty of ammunition, and the cattle on ten thousand hills are ours. We have forty thousand Belgian muskets coming; but bring your guns and muskets with you, if you have
Doc. 154.-the fight at Dug Springs, Mo. August 2, 1861. A correspondent at Curran, Stone County, Missouri, gives the following account of this affair:--The report which reached us at Springfield, gave rise to the belief that Gen. McCulloch designed an attack upon that point, by two columns moving from Cassville and Sarcoxie. The Federal scouts reported their force at about fifteen thousand in each division, and on Wednesday they were reported within twenty miles of the town and advancing sionally by the report of musket shots from our sentinels. Two or three stragglers were brought in as prisoners, who stated that they belonged to the command of Gen. Rains, and seemed glad enough to be captured. They reported that the army of McCulloch was five miles in the rear, and that accessions were being recruited from all the adjoining counties. This information agreed with that gained from the prisoners, and betrayed the weakness of the enemy; said they, We have had nothing but fresh
other specimens of the matter which the edition of the paper referred to contained: Our Southern papers are filled with heart-sickening accounts of the murders and robberies which individuals in Old Abe's Mob are perpetrating on the Southern people. Innocent women and children are shot on their own doorsteps, for wearing what is called secession bonnets. No wonder the Northern people run, when the honest men of the South march toward them. Missouri will not be Marylandized.--Gens. McCulloch and Price are reported to be marching on Springfield with thirty thousand men, with a view of attacking Siegels forces, and driving them from their soil. The people of Maryland cannot be held in subjection many weeks longer. Many of their wealthy citizens are confined in jail without cause, and are treated shamefully. The mob of Lincoln continues to annoy the people on every corner of the streets, and it seems to us that humanity calls loudly for some method of redress for its cit
s reported to have been heavy, including Generals McCulloch and Price. Their tents and wagons were at which place it had been agreed between Gens. McCulloch, Pearce, and myself, that our respective ay effected a junction with the armies of Gens. McCulloch and Pearce. The combined armies were tville. The next morning, a messenger from Gen. McCulloch informed me that he had reason to believe iles on the road. He sent back at once to Gen. McCulloch for reinforcements, and Col. Me Intosh, C.nder the direction, for the time being, of Gen. McCulloch, who accordingly assumed the command in ch the night and a threatened storm caused General McCulloch, just as the army was about to march, tock until he could receive reinforcements. Gen. McCulloch was with me when these messengers caine, aCulloch, Brigadier-General Commanding. Ben. McCulloch's report. Headquarters McCulloch's brm of invaders. All honor and gratitude to Ben. McCulloch and the gallant men with him, who met and [8 more...]
at which place it had been agreed between Gens. McCulloch, Pearce, and myself, that our respective ay effected a junction with the armies of Gens. McCulloch and Pearce. The combined armies were tr marching orders, and the First Division, Gen. McCulloch commanding, left Cassville on the 1st of Aville. The next morning, a messenger from Gen. McCulloch informed me that he had reason to believe iles on the road. He sent back at once to Gen. McCulloch for reinforcements, and Col. Me Intosh, C.nder the direction, for the time being, of Gen. McCulloch, who accordingly assumed the command in ch the night and a threatened storm caused General McCulloch, just as the army was about to march, tospension of the pursuit of the enemy until Gen. McCulloch came up, and detached the Louisiana regimeCulloch, Brigadier-General Commanding. Ben. McCulloch's report. Headquarters McCulloch's brMcCulloch's brigade, camp Weightman, near Springfield, Mo., August 12, 1861. Brigadier-General J. Cooper, Adjutan[3 more...]
xultation. The victory in Missouri is gloriously confirmed; Lyon is killed and Siegel in flight and believed to be captured; Sweeney is killed, and Southwestern Missouri cleared of the National scum of invaders. All honor and gratitude to Ben. McCulloch and the gallant men with him, who met and scourged the minions of National tyranny. The brave sons of Louisiana were there and foremost in the fight, as at Manassas. There was a panic, it seems, of the untried and probably half-armed trooment for the subjugation of the States on the Lower Mississippi. They have been broken and dispersed. Southwestern Missouri is free already. The Southeast cannot long stand before the advancing armies of Pillow and Hardee, joined to those of McCulloch; and the next word will be: On to St. Louis! That taken, the power of Lincolnism is broken in the whole West; and instead of shouting, Ho! for Richmond! and Ho! for New Orleans! there will be hurryings to and fro among the frightened magna
Doc. 180.-proclamation of Ben. McCulloch. Headquarters Western army, camp near Spingfield, Mo., Aug. 12, 1861. To the People of Missouri:-- Having been called by the Governor of your State to assist in driving the National forces out of thle of the State to act. You can no longer procrastinate. Missouri must now take her position, be it North or South. Ben. McCulloch, Brig.-General Commanding. Ben. McCulloch's order. Headquarters of Western army, near Springfield, Mo., AugBen. McCulloch's order. Headquarters of Western army, near Springfield, Mo., Aug. 12, 1861. The General commanding takes great pleasure in announcing to the army under his command the signal victory it has just gained. Soldiers of Louisiana, of Arkansas, of Missouri, and of Texas, nobly have you sustained yourselves. Shouldsingle outrage. The private property of citizens of either party must be respected. Soldiers who fought as you did day before yesterday cannot rob or plunder. By order of Ben. McCulloch. Jas. Mointosh, Captain C. S. A., and Adjutant-General.
good people of the State of Missouri to the unbridled license of the brutal soldiery of an unscrupulous enemy; therefore, be it Resolved by the Congress of the Confederate States, That the thanks of Congress are cordially tendered to Brig.-Gen. Ben. McCulloch, and the officers and soldiers of his brave command, for their gallant conduct in defeating, after a battle of six and a half hours, a force of the enemy equal in numbers, and greatly superior in all their appointments, thus proving thareatly superior in all their appointments, thus proving that a right cause nerves the hearts and strengthens the arms of the Southern people, fighting, as they are, for their liberty, their homes, and friends, against an unholy despotism. Resolved, That in the opinion of Congress, General McCulloch and his gallant troops are entitled to, and will receive the grateful thanks of our people. Resolved, That the foregoing resolutions be communicated to that command by the proper department.