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an officer of the steamer Dunleith, just from the scene of action. It would appear that the Union forces at Milliken's Bend were under the command of a colonel of Iowa volunteers — supposed to be the Twenty-third--and his force consisted of two Iowa regiments and one or two colored regiments, new in the service, and short in point of numbers, and no heavy or even light artillery of any importance with which to repel an attack. But hearing early on Saturday that the rebels, under General Henry McCulloch, brother of Ben McCulloch, were concentrating near him, with a menacing front, toward Milliken's Bend, the commander sent out some cavalry with orders, to reconnoitre and report. The cavalry dashed out from the works early in the day, and soon returned with a full confirmation of the report previously brought in, in regard to the proximity of the rebels and their designs upon the little garrison at the Bend. The rebels were said to be about five thousand strong, and late from Al
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 23: siege and capture of Vicksburg and Port Hudson. (search)
ering forces there again) would endeavor, with eight thousand men from Richmond, in that State, to open communication with him from the west side of the river. Already that commander had sent between two and three thousand troops, under General Henry McCulloch (brother of Ben., who was killed at Pea Ridge), to strike — a blow. It was leveled at a little force, chiefly of colored troops, called the African brigade, stationed at Milliken's Bend, under General Elias S. Dennis, composed of about fourteen hundred These were the Twenty-third Iowa, white; and Ninth and Eleventh Louisiana and First Mississippi, colored. effective men, of whom all but one hundred and sixty (the Twenty-third Iowa) were negroes. McCulloch's blow fell first, though lightly, on the Ninth Louisiana (colored), commanded by Colonel H. Lieb, who went out on a reconnoissance from Milliken's Bend toward Richmond, on the 6th of June, 1863. preceded by two companies of the Tenth Illinois cavalry, Captain Anderso
. E. S. Dennis, with barely 1,061 So Gen. Dennis reports. Mr. G. G. Edwards, who was present, reports our numbers as follows: 23d Iowa, 160; 9th La., 500; 11th La. about 600; 1st Miss., 150: total, 1,410. effective, whereof the 23d Iowa, Col. Glasgow, numbered 160; the residue were negroes, very recently enlisted, and organized as the 9th and 11th Louisiana and 1st Mississippi. Against this post, a Rebel force from the interior of Louisiana, said to consist of six regiments under Gen. Henry McCulloch, numbering 2,000 to 3,000, advanced June 6. from Richmond, La., driving in the 9th Louisiana and two companies of cavalry who had been out on a reconnoissance, and pursuing them nearly up to our earthworks at the Bend, where they were stopped by nightfall, and lay on their arms, not doubting that they would go in with a rush next morning. But, just at dark, a steamboat passed, enabling Dennis to send to Admiral Porter for aid; when the gunboats Choctaw and Lexington were sent do
h was born in Rutherford county, Tenn., son of Alexander McCulloch, a native of Virginia, who served as aide-de-camp to General Coffee, under Andrew Jackson. Henry McCulloch was educated in Tennessee, and in early manhood emigrated to Texas, settling in Guadalupe county. In 1843 he was elected sheriff of that county, and, while hbrought order out of chaos and restored confidence. In a report to the war department he referred to the prompt patriotism with which Brigadier-Generals Hebert, McCulloch and Nelson, and the officers and men of the various Texas regiments, came to my assistance. Colonel Nelson had been promoted to brigadier-general on the 10th ofry 27, 1861, and in the war between the North and South bore a conspicuous part as leader of Texas troops. In 1862 he had command of a brigade of Texas cavalry, McCulloch's division, and was on duty in the district of Arkansas. He proved himself a very efficient officer and, like many others, was in command of a brigade long befo
inconsiderate, hasty or passions to action. I implore the citizens of Texas not to cross Red river, into the country leased from the Choctaws and Chickasaws, in armed bodies. It is not necessary, and therefore they have no right to do so. In the exercise of the powers vested in me, I have stipulated that all the Texas troops shall be withdrawn, and their place supplied by companies of Choctaw and Chickasaw troops, and have given advice of this to the Governor of Texas, and to Col, Henry McCulloch. I shall give the Comanche Chiefs white flags and letters of safeguard for themselves and all the persons of their bands. To violate these letters would be to dishonor the Republic, and he who does it will commit a high crime. It is my most anxious desire to effect a permanent peace with the Comanches, and their settlement upon Reserves. With the aid of the people of Texas I can do it. Let them not listen to lying reports, set on foot no one knows by whom, and attributing to
nse utility. Yesterday all the commissioned officers who were captured at Lexington, with the exception of Col. Mulligan, reached this point under escort of Capt. Champion, of the Confederate service. They left there the day after I did, and bring no later intelligence from that point than that contained in my last letter. Some of them state that Gen. Price unearthed from the fortifications several hundred bombs, which had been buried there by his predecessors in treason, of whose existence the national troops were ignorant. Major Tanner died to-day of his wounds, and as I write, a military cortege, with reverse arms, and step in accord with the movements of a solemn dirge, is passing my window to do honor to his remains. A forward movement on the part of Fremont, in the direction of Lexington, is talked of for to- morrow. The whereabouts of McCulloch are still as mysterious as ever. I honestly believe him dead from the effects of a wound received at Springfield.
erate, hasty, or passionate actions. I implore the citizens of Texas not to cross Red River into the country leased from the Choctaw and Chickasaws, in armed bodies. It is not necessary, and therefore the people have no right to do so. In the exercise of the powers vested in me, I have stipulated that all the Texas troops shall be withdrawn and their place be supplied by companies of Choctaw and Chickasaw troops; and have given advice of this to the Governor of Texas, and to Col. Henry McCulloch. I shall give the Comanche Chiefs white flags and letters of safeguard for themselves and all the Republic, and he who does it will commit a high crime. It is my most anxious desire to effect a permanent peace with the Comanche, and their settlement upon Reserves. With the aid of the people of Texas I can do it. Let them not listen to lying reports, set on foot, no one knows by whom, and attributing to the Comanche all the villainies of the Cai-o-was, who have refused to ma