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Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 4 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 33 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 5 3 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 8, 1863., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Pea Ridge campaign. (search)
left, under General John B. Clark and Colonel Robert McCulloch, had turned the Federal right wing, a line.-editors. the advance and onslaught of McCulloch's troops were checked by the command of Ostewing under Price, near Elkhorn Tavern. Of McCulloch's column, Drew retreated to the south-west tPike himself remained. Greer, who succeeded McCulloch in command of the wing, moved with the remaie brigades of Davis, by striking the left of McCulloch's advancing column, threw it into disorder aorn and Price, including about two-thirds of McCulloch's troops under Churchill and Greer, and one-untains. A report of the actual strength of McCulloch's division on March 11th, three days after t was at Pea Ridge, when, after the defeat of McCulloch, Van Dorn and Price had settled down on our on the heights, west of Elkhorn Tavern, and McCulloch's immediately on its right, he would have gases and without ammunition. The death of McCulloch was not only fatal to his troops, but also a[7 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
anley's divisions with some cavalry in pursuit. The cavalry came up with Price's rear-guard in the afternoon, but having been roughly handled and driven back by McCulloch's regiment of Missouri cavalry, supported by Colonel Rogers's regiment of Texas sharp-shooters and Bledsoe's battery, the pursuit was abandoned and the ConfederaAdams. Brigade loss: k, 22; w, 95 = 117. cavalry, Brig.-Gen. Frank C. Armstrong: Miss. regiment, Col. Wirt Adams; 2d Ark., Col. W. F. Slemons; 2d Mo., Col. Robert McCulloch; 1st Miss. Partisan Rangers, Col. W. C. Falkner. Loss not reported. Total Confederate loss: killed, 85; wounded, 410; captured or missing, 40 = 535. m, 200 = 567. Cavalry (composition probably incomplete), Brig.-Gen. Frank C. Armstrong: 2d Ark., Col. W. F. Slemons; Miss. Reg't, Col. Wirt Adams; 2d Mo., Col. Robert McCulloch. Cavalry loss: w, 2; om, 9 = 11. Reserve Artillery: Tenn. Battery (Hoxton's), Lieut. Thomas F. Tobin (c); Alta. Battery, Capt. Henry H. Sengstak. Artill
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Corinth, Miss., October 3d and 4th, 1862. (search)
N. Hogg. Brigade loss: k, 98; w, 323; m, 214 = 635. Phifer's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. C. W. Phifer: 3d Ark. Cav. (dismounted),----; 6th Tex. Cav. (dismounted), Col. L. S. Ross; 9th Tex. Cav. (dismounted),----; Stirman's Sharp-shooters, Col. Ras. Stirman: Ark. Battery (McNally's), Lieut. Frankly A. Moore. Brigade loss: k, 94; w, 273; m, 200 = 567. Cavalry (composition probably incomplete), Brig.-Gen. Frank C. Armstrong: 2d Ark., Col. W. F. Slemons; Miss. Reg't, Col. Wirt Adams; 2d Mo., Col. Robert McCulloch. Cavalry loss: w, 2; om, 9 = 11. Reserve Artillery: Tenn. Battery (Hoxton's), Lieut. Thomas F. Tobin (c); Alta. Battery, Capt. Henry H. Sengstak. Artillery loss: k, 1; w, 4; m, 14 = 19. District of the Mississippi. first division, Maj.-Gen. Mansfield Lovell. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Albert Rust: 4th Ala., Battalion, Maj.----Gibson; 31st Ala.,----; 35th Ala., Capt. A. E. Ashford; 9th Ark., Col. Isaac L. Dunlop; 3d Ky., Col. A. P. Thompson; 7th Ky., Col. Ed. Cross-land; Miss.
E. H. C. Bailey, surgeon; E. B. Hull, inspector. In the Pea Ridge campaign the unorganized Confederate battalions under the command respectively of Colonels T. H. Rosser, John T. Hughes, Eugene Erwin, James McCown and R. S. Bevier, with Landis' battery and some other forces, constituted the Second Missouri brigade, under command of Brig.-Gen. William Y. Slack, but after the death of General Slack it was merged into the First brigade. The Second Missouri cavalry was organized with Robert McCulloch, Jr., lieutenant-colonel; Cozzens, major; Charles Quarles, adjutant; James Chandler, sergeant-major. The Third Missouri cavalry was organized with D. Todd Samuels, lieutenant-colonel; T. J. McQuilley, major; W. J. Van Kirk, quartermaster; J. Waite, surgeon. Guibor's battery was organized with Henry Guibor, captain; M. Brown, first lieutenant; W. Corkney, second lieutenant; J. McBride, third lieutenant; C. Hefferman, fourth lieutenant. Landis' battery was organized with J. C. Landis, ca
ansas showed no disposition to help him. General McCulloch, at his comfortable winter quarters near, and enlisting in the Confederate service. McCulloch alone had men enough—well armed, well drille that could have been brought against them. McCulloch was immovable. A retrograde movement on Prirovisions. At this point Generals Price and McCulloch met and had a conference, the result of whicrences by taking personal command of his and McCulloch's forces, and attacking the enemy. Price's . He spent a day with Price and another with McCulloch, with the result that he determined to move ed into two corps, commanded respectively by McCulloch and Price, aggregating about 17,000 men. Theong, was left to guard the train and stock. McCulloch's corps was composed of eleven Confederate r But in reconnoitering the enemy's position, McCulloch advanced too far and was shot and instantly thought they were making a movement to help McCulloch's wing, and fully expected to be engaged aga[7 more...]
fered almost as severely. It was these two commands and a little Arkansas battalion that charged and captured the nine cannon. General Price was elated at the victory he had gained, and was at first disposed to remain in Iuka and fight Grant's whole force, but on reflection he yielded to the representations of his officers, and during the night commenced to withdraw. The enemy made a feeble pursuit until they were checked by Bledsoe's battery and the Second Texas rifles, and charged by McCulloch's cavalry, which cooled their ardor to such an extent that they did not again fire a gun. The Confederate loss in these engagements was about 600 and that of the enemy was estimated at about 1,000. The retreating army reached Baldwin on the 22nd of September, and remained there four days, when it moved to Ripley to form a junction with Van Dorn's forces. General Price was now at liberty to co-operate with Van Dorn in an attack on Corinth. But his force, since the proposition was origina
62, it was ordered with Clayton's Second Alabama under Gen. James R. Chalmers against the Federals at Booneville, Miss., who were completely routed. Together with the Second Missouri cavalry, it was ordered, under Gen. Frank C. Armstrong, to Tennessee, where it met at Middleburg, Tenn., the Federals under Colonel Leggett, and defeated the enemy, killing and wounding large numbers of them. About the last of July the Second Arkansas, under Colonel Slemons, the Second Missouri, under Cot Robert McCulloch, and the Fourth Mississippi, under Wirt Adams, engaged the escort of Federal cavalry and artillery guarding a train of supplies at Britton's lane, Tenn., and after a stubborn conflict of three hours captured the train and 300 prisoners and two pieces of artillery. The Second Arkansas lost 70 men killed and wounded in this engagement. In the campaigns of Price and Pemberton in Mississippi, it was in continuous active service. Under General Chalmers, in 1863, it participated in the bat
pied in northwestern Mississippi with an infantry expedition from Memphis, under Col. George E. Bryant, Twelfth Wisconsin, supported by Gen. W. S. Smith. At Hernando, on the evening of April 18th, Col. W. C. Falkner attacked the enemy, and a severe engagement followed in which Falkner lost about 40 killed and a proportionate number wounded and captured, while the Federal loss was considerable. Bryant then advanced toward Coldwater, but was defeated by Chalmers' command reinforced by Colonel McCulloch, Maj. G. L. Blythe attacking in the rear, and fell back to Hernando and thence to Memphis. On April 25th a Federal detachment went down the west side of Lake Saint Joseph from Bayou Vidal, and pushing away a detachment of Trans-Mississippi cavalry under Maj. Isaac F. Harrison, made its way to Hard Times landing, building bridges for the army to follow. On the 29th Grant had 10,000 soldiers in transports at Hard Times, and Porter was sent against the batteries at Grand Gulf with sev
al posts in Tennessee and at Corinth. General Chalmers was also active in the northeast, embarrassing the enemy's transportation on the river. Col. Wirt Adams engaged Federal gunboats with his artillery at Liverpool Landing, May 20th-23d. Col. R. McCulloch's cavalry fought with an expedition from La Grange in the Senatobia swamp, May 23d. Colonel Slemons, about the same time, after firing on Federal transports near Austin, had a severe encounter with the cavalry under Ellet, who burned the trigades. That commanded by Col. W. F. Slemons contained, in addition to an Arkansas and a Tennessee regiment, Col. John McQuirk's Third regiment State troops; the Fifth regiment, Col. James Z. George, and Capt. J. M. McLendon's battery. Col. Robert McCulloch's brigade held, in addition to his own Missouri regiment, the First Partisans, Lieut.-Col. L. B. Hovis; Eighteenth battalion, Lieut.-Col. A. H. Chalmers; and the Buckner battery, Lieut. H. C. Holt. The brigade of Col. Robert C. Richardso
manded by Brig.-Gen. R. V. Richardson, Col. Robert McCulloch, Col. T. H. Bell, and Col. J. E. Forreus, Forrest's to Aberdeen and Chalmers, with McCulloch's and Richardson's brigades, to West Point tuntil he was joined by General Forrest, with McCulloch's and Richardson's brigades. But Forrest dind thrown across in front of the bridge, and McCulloch's brigade took position on the south bank toed, a section of Morton's battery and one of McCulloch's regiments on foot, immediately accepted th with his mounted cavalry, and reinforced by McCulloch kept up hot pursuit till night fall. By thi engagement occurred in which, reinforced by McCulloch's and Forrest's brigades, the Confederates f, Col. James J. Neely —Second brigade, Col. Robert McCulloch: First Mississippi Rangers (Seventh reucker was in charge of Col. D. C. Kelly, and McCulloch's brigade, mainly Mississippians, included Crge F. Abbay, and early in September part of McCulloch's brigade was sent to Mobile. On Septembe[5 more...]
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